bicycle engine clutch.

PatMcLJr

New Member
Jun 21, 2009
29
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0
earth
Great help posts!
Thanks all and especially Norman.

I don't need one yet, I hope, but where do you get gear the puller tool?

Thanks,
Pat Jr.
 

Mike Hunt

New Member
Jun 9, 2009
184
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0
Toronto, Ontario
on my bike the clutch doesnt fully disengage when i pull the lever in all the way, and slips a little when engaged, tightening flower nut should solve it, no?
 

reg454

New Member
Jan 11, 2009
269
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39
michigan
on my bike the clutch doesnt fully disengage when i pull the lever in all the way, and slips a little when engaged, tightening flower nut should solve it, no?
Yes it will you should also take the flower nut off and the metal piece that is holding it on and use a file or a grinder and scuff up the surface that makes contact with the pads. Because with it slipping you could have glazed the pads and smoothed out the surface of the disk this way you can get a really good grip onto the pads. Then when that is all done you can adjust the flower nut as you see fit.

If you tighten the flower nut too much and you do not have that much play with the clutch disengaging
then you can tighten the inner clutch spring like 1 revolution but make sure you loosen the flower nut before that. Their are a few posts on how to tighten the inner clutch spring Norman posted one in his thread page and I wrote one too their is a link to mine below feel free to read Normans too.
 
Reg454,
My fear is that if you scuff up the clutch plate it will act as a file on your clutch pads and wear them out faster.

I'd stick with cleaning them with brake cleaner and keep the grease and oil out. go easy on the brake cleaner too as the large bevel gear bearings are right there and you could wash out all their lubrication in the process.

Sanding the clutch pad edges to make them float in their pockets has been the best improvement for my clutch so far.
 

vcm1376

New Member
Mar 18, 2009
3
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0
Cordova TN
My small gear is stuck. I was riding down the road and the engine sounded like it was being bogged down. It kept slowing down more and more and suddenly, it locked up the back tire. I pulled the clutch lever in and was able to pedal to my destination, but now the small gear will not turn. Is the woodruf key stuck somehow? Did it overheat and get stuck? I can't even get it loose enough to take it apart now. I think I bought a bad engine anyway. It may be easier just to buy a better one from dax.
 

hi4noon

New Member
Jul 21, 2009
23
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0
Massachusetts
Great post Norman! Has helped me greatly in fixing my stripped clutch shaft. I am stuck right now and could use some advice.

Can you explain how to take out the clutch shaft? I removed the large gear but am not sure how to remove the bearing or the clutch shaft. Do I have to use the small end of the puller and screw onto the clutch shaft? I don't see how that will work. Kinda stumped right now. Or do i just pull and pop the bearing out with the clutch shaft (that was how it was with rollerblades)
 

shearbf

New Member
May 8, 2009
77
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0
Muskegon,MI USA
I did not notice exactly this in any posts so here goes:
On one of my new built bikes, I've gone nuts and built three now, mileage just in the teens the clutch fails to disingage after sitting for a few days. Everything is proper,cabel, lever, arm,etc. When not stuck it works and the bike rides fine. At first it would be stuck and holding the lever in and backing the bike a couple inches coused a "thunk" and bike rides normal. Now,after sitting about a week, no thunk no disingage.
I have not gone into a clutch yet haveing no need to. So, what to do?
 

Norman

LORD VADER Moderator
Staff member
Jan 16, 2008
2,605
2
38
68
pampa texas
your chain is bunching up on the front sprocket. need to clearance the area around the front sprocket and get your chain slack to 1/2" at mid span on the top run.
 

shearbf

New Member
May 8, 2009
77
0
0
Muskegon,MI USA
Thanks Norm; Nothing quite so simple or I wouldn't have asked.
Cover removal reviled a nasty black corrosion on all steel parts on the primary side.
Only thing I've seen like was flood damage in some large electric motors one time.
So, I'm blaming the power washer.
Replaceing parts is easyer than cleanup and pretty cheap.
Parts are here and that one of my three bikes will go back togather today.
Lessen for me: Don't fart around, just go in there and find out!
 

pnz

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
57
0
0
Rosedale, Ca.
Norm, I have a Mega Motor 80/66cc and I adusted my clutch with your instuctions. It made a great difference. When will your China Girl Repair Manual be on sale (Chilton Manuals).
I noticed that the clutch pads are round and would like to know where I could fine a supplier that would carry this material. Is it a simi-matalic material or just pressed card board and or fiber.
It would be nice to buy a one foot lenght and be able to cut it to the right length as we need to replace the pads.
 

marts1

New Member
Sep 18, 2009
392
0
0
Oshawa Ont CA
There are drill bits available that will make the right size out of whatever material you want, maybe hard rubber or leather, some works better then others.
 

pnz

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
57
0
0
Rosedale, Ca.
So, will leather work I know that is what they used on wagons 100 years ago I think what they use now is Expanded Vermiculite that is what I googled, like to know where I can order a sheet of it and a Leather punch would work. Or even if they made it in the diameter of the holes in the clutch wheel, in foot length.


There are drill bits available that will make the right size out of whatever material you want, maybe hard rubber or leather, some works better then others.
 

marts1

New Member
Sep 18, 2009
392
0
0
Oshawa Ont CA
I used leather from used shoes...cardboard even worked for awhile. Still havn't found anything that quite works as good as original pucks which just reminded me hockey pucks might work. Anywho, nothing has harmed the plates at all.
 

pnz

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
57
0
0
Rosedale, Ca.
I found this web page I will try and contact them and see if they will deal with me,
Flexible Molded Friction Materials
ferotec-flexible-molded-materials
Flexible Molded Materials are made from a blend of ingredients including thermosetting resins, reinforcing fibers, rubber particles and friction modifiers. The mix is prepared in a pasty consistency and then roll formed in Ferotec’s unique process. The materials are then semi -cured so that they can be formed to fit shoes, bands, etc. The products can be finish cured in an oven or they will service cure in their applications. The Ferotec line of flexible molded materials cover most of the light and medium duty dry friction applications.

 

pnz

New Member
Aug 19, 2009
57
0
0
Rosedale, Ca.
Rigid Molded Materials are made from a blend of dry ingredients including thermosetting resins, reinforcing fibers and friction modifiers. The materials are molded under heat and pressure to provide excellent performance in the type applications they are intended for. Generally the Ferotec rigid molded materials have the highest strength, the best high temperature performance and the most durability of the conventional friction material line.