How to run bearings in this set up?

RocketJ

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Also low to the ground for speed.

Though seriously the gear box, not that it looks to stick out some, that I know the gyroscopic effect of the wheels make that less of an issue, but the gear box ground clearance. Where you ride and in turns I was wondering if it is OK?

Other: I did not go for keeping pedals on my off-road DMV stickered bike and it looks like a Mad Max construction. Some people think its great, some others not. I though do like the DIY builds and think about how they built what I'm looking at. That is what starts conversation.
I plan in adding a side car so I'm not worried about scraping anything.
 

RocketJ

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So I hit another slight, weird issue. The pipe that the seat post slides into doesn't have slits at the top for a clamp to compress onto. I tried cutting 2 slits, but the steel is too strong and just breaks the clamp. Any ideas?
 
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Tom from Rubicon

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Bigger stronger clamp or anneal the clamping area.
You indicated that your frame was robustly constructed. what is the Down tube wall thickness?
On the to the seat post give me some dimensions and I will make you a clamp.

Incidentally were going to post a link of the frame fabricator. It is important to add resources.
Tom
 
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RocketJ

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Bigger stronger clamp or anneal the clamping area.
You indicated that your frame was robustly constructed. what is the Down tube wall thickness?
On the to the seat post give me some dimensions and I will make you a clamp.

Incidentally were going to post a link of the frame fabricator. It is important to add resources.
Tom
Hey Tom, I'll check the thickness when I get home later. I appreciate the help. The fabricator goes by the name Howla on ebay.
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Ok, by their specs. you need a 1.125" dia. seat post tube, 28.57mm dia.. There in lays the problem. The most common seat post size is 27.2 mm (1.07 in) . at least where the seat clamp fastens. Here is a link to the saddle I am using.
Brooks b190
Out of stock, bugger. F'n covid.
Best saddle on a bike i ever had.
On motorcycles?
1950 Harley FL with a floating saddle is something while the back wheel is jumping all over.
Let me know if you need something machined. My shop time is beer.
Tom
 
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RocketJ

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Ok, by their specs. you need a 1.125" dia. seat post tube, 28.57mm dia.. There in lays the problem. The most common seat post size is 27.2 mm (1.07 in) . at least where the seat clamp fastens. Here is a link to the saddle I am using.
.
Out of stock, bugger. F'n covid.
Best saddle on a bike i ever had.
On motorcycles?
1950 Harley FL with a floating saddle is something while the back wheel is jumping all over.
Let me know if you need something machined. My shop time is beer.
Tom
Thanks tom. My concern is that every bike has slits at the top of the post that compress. This frame doesn't have that or had the ability to do that. I was thinking about a clamp that has 2 inner diameters. One that matches the bicycle seat stem and one that matches the post diameter. What do you think? Would it work? My other thought was to use p clamps and just connect the end of the seat to the rear fork of the bike similar to a saddle. I don't know. I'm just spit balling at the moment. Maybe a renforced clamp would work or maybe i just need to cut longer slits into the tube. Not sure.
 
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MEASURE TWICE

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Annealing was mentioned and the idea of a clamp that clamps to with two inner diameters. I guess the outer diameter would be to clamp to the outside of the frame tube. The seat post could be grabbed by the second inner clamping trube. The adjustment of seat height would work OK. Annealing with cut slit in the tube top may work, but I'm not sure how to prevent the hardened areas of frame from getting the treatment where you do not want. Big heat sink. If it were not for expecting something from manufacturer, myself I could scrounge a seat tube section off another bike and MIG weld it to the frame. Just at this point you mention about the manufacturer and if they have answers? Was this a one that got away?
 
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RocketJ

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Annealing was mentioned and the idea of a clamp that clamps to with two inner diameters. I guess the outer diameter would be to clamp to the outside of the frame tube. The seat post could be grabbed by the second inner clamping trube. The adjustment of seat height would work OK. Annealing with cut slit in the tube top may work, but I'm not sure how to prevent the hardened areas of frame from getting the treatment where you do not want. Big heat sink. If it were not for expecting something from manufacturer, myself I could scrounge a seat tube section off another bike and MIG weld it to the frame. Just at this point you mention about the manufacturer and if they have answers? Was this a one that got away?
Welding wouldn't be a bad idea. I really want to keep the frame unmolested if possible though. the seller has an active store on ebay. His frames are just ever so slightly...off? Your explanation of the clamp is spot on. If i could get someone to mill that i think it would work pretty well..how would I go about annealing? This is the first I've heard of it.
 

Tom from Rubicon

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A shouldered bushing is the fix. Slit the seat tube for and aft. The afore mentioned bushing with one slit to take up the difference of the seat post OD and seat down tube ID.
I started this thread awhile back. Like I said, I work for beer.
Tom
 

RocketJ

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A shouldered bushing is the fix. Slit the seat tube for and aft. The afore mentioned bushing with one slit to take up the difference of the seat post OD and seat down tube ID.
I started this thread awhile back. Like I said, I work for beer.
Tom
I'm still learning machining jargon so let me see if I'm understanding correctly. Cut a slit into the seat tube (the tube that's part of the frame) then cut a similar slit into the bushing. Put the bushing into the seat tube. The bushing would then create a snug fit when i slide in the seat post. Did i get that right? If you can get this working, I'll ship you any case of beer you want lol.
 
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Tom from Rubicon

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You got it Rocket, you need a split bushing/sleeve to take up the difference of the seat tube and seat post.
If there isn't a one inch slit in the seat tube you have to cut one. Otherwise the seat post clamp will not transfer it's grip.
What were you using ? In #102 you said you broke the seat post clamp. That's a new one on me.
Tom
 

RocketJ

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You got it Rocket, you need a split bushing/sleeve to take up the difference of the seat tube and seat post.
If there isn't a one inch slit in the seat tube you have to cut one. Otherwise the seat post clamp will not transfer it's grip.
What were you using ? In #102 you said you broke the seat post clamp. That's a new one on me.
Tom
I'll see if i can lengthen the slit. It might be less than an inch. The screw on the clamp broke. But there's not really a way to replace it without damaging it further as far as I can tell. I'll check over it all again later today in the workshop.
 

RocketJ

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You got it Rocket, you need a split bushing/sleeve to take up the difference of the seat tube and seat post.
If there isn't a one inch slit in the seat tube you have to cut one. Otherwise the seat post clamp will not transfer it's grip.
What were you using ? In #102 you said you broke the seat post clamp. That's a new one on me.
Tom
Alrighty, update: so it turns out the clamp was never going to work. The id of the seat tube just doesn't allow conventional clamps to be used as far as i can tell. So the question is...what kind of beer do you want? Lol
 
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MEASURE TWICE

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I'm not sure how you feel about shims for a new unbroken clamp of the same if no other is available. A shim I made from a Classic Schlitz beer can cut and pounded flat is under my press button kill switch on y handle bars. The diameter of bar was too small. I added 2 wires for the switch not relying on ground through any means. Direct to magneto wire and external star tooth washer with ring terminal to magneto lamination.
 
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RocketJ

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I'm not sure how you feel about shims for a new unbroken clamp of the same if no other is available. A shim I made from a Classic Schlitz beer can cut and pounded flat is under my press button kill switch on y handle bars. The diameter of bar was too small. I added 2 wires for the switch not relying on ground through any means. Direct to magneto wire and external star tooth washer with ring terminal to magneto lamination.
do you have a picture?
 
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Tom from Rubicon

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Don't worry about rewards Rocket, the priority is get you rolling. MT must have missed the per side .055" shim needed.
.Classic Schlitz beer can cut and pounded. Classic MacGyver. :)
Problem with aluminum is it has no spring back on compression. The more it is compressed the more it flows to relieve compression
Lets start with dimensions.
Precisely. Do you have, or have access to precision measuring tools? If you lived in Wisconsin I could finalize what I needed to make the bushing and a clamp.
Tom
 
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