Bike builders that have machine tools/shops

Discussion in 'The Tavern' started by Tom from Rubicon, May 19, 2019.

  1. Tinsmith

    Tinsmith Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    98
    You "Old Guys"! Whoops, I guess I should be quiet. Sorry. Carry on

    Dan
     
  2. Tom from Rubicon

    Tom from Rubicon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2016
    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    1,204
    Hey Dan, no apology required as I resemble your remark.
    It comes to all that don't kill themselves first.
    Enjoy the thread.
    I started it to sniff out other MotorBicycle enthusiast's who produce parts for themselves or in my case have traded work for parts from vendors.
    In my last photo, if you are wondering how that crockpot fits into the scheme of things.;) There have been threads on this and the other forum. Discussing wax impregnation of drive chains. And wax recipes. All require chains immersed in a molten wax bath. Wally World has these three qt. crockpot's for ten bucks. It is still an experiment.
    Tom from Rubicon
     
    indian22 and fasteddy like this.
  3. Tinsmith

    Tinsmith Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    98
    Tom, that's a good one. I hear tell #41 chain is pretty tasty if ya fix it just right.

    Dan
     
    indian22 and fasteddy like this.
  4. Tom from Rubicon

    Tom from Rubicon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2016
    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    1,204
    Dan, I have cooked #41 and #35, neither one has meat to bother with. My recipe has shown some degree of durability and no slinging. My machine has no chain guards. O-ring chain would be nice.
    Tom from Rubicon
     
    indian22 and fasteddy like this.
  5. Tony01

    Tony01 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    407
    My experience has been that chains do not like to go fast if they are not in an oil bath. Most people running a dry chain primary do not put the miles in. The people I have known that ran high miles with a minimum of drivetrain maintenance were guys with belt primaries. The best deal for a dry system is a belt primary. Much can be learned from lawnmower racers about high hp and v-belts. Also low tooth counts as found on most modern clutches absolutely kill chains in short order. I think a belt primary with clutch on the jack shaft like the whizzer is the way to go. Maintenance becomes easy unlike on the engine you must change the spring to get a smoother lockup. But on the jackshaft after an approx 1.4 reduction you can run a stock mt clutch and it will lockup at the right rpm for our needs and keep the bike slim; could even shorten the crankshaft.
     
  6. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,984
    Likes Received:
    1,281
    Right on Tony, remember my Monark back in the 50's, like a Whizzer had belt primary, but also belt to rear. ( Quiet )

    Even the China girls have a reduction up front..........Curt
     
  7. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2008
    Messages:
    4,984
    Likes Received:
    1,281
    So finally got my picture to reload on my computer. Here is my lathe and drill press. Old Harbor freight 16 speed
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    Making a rip fence, for cut off saw, needed a way to relief for magnets, so put the drill press on slowest speed, and it worked with spade bit. LOL
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Tom from Rubicon

    Tom from Rubicon Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2016
    Messages:
    793
    Likes Received:
    1,204
    Have you ever rode a Sportsman Flyer Tony? Pat sets up the Bully clutches such that my bike "engine" brakes. I bought a EZ-Q and chose not to use it.

    If chains wear out every hundred miles, not a problem. My Flyer is also getting steel receiving and out-put sprockets on the reduction drive. 7075 T-6 aluminum has approximately the same properties as low carbon steel
    Regarding oil bath primaries. That is a ideal that at high chain speed (I'm not saying I would not give it a try) would be a drag on torque. Harley did until the Evolution Engine have a oil drip in the transfer case to lubricate the primary chain. That is why they (leaked).
    In the mean time I am giving the wax base lube a trial.
    Tom from Rubicon.
     
    indian22 and fasteddy like this.
  9. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2,281
    Likes Received:
    204
    I ask you all what work gloves can there be attained that I can use that prevent metal slivers (very small can't nearly bee seen) from getting inbedded in the glove an eventually going through and into hand and or fingers. I like some I got at HF Tool for cheap about 10 bucks I think. They have more than just fabric, but not completely covered with stuff that stops this from happening. Cleaning can it be done to get the slivers out, or is it just time to toss them in the trash, as I did? I can grab em back out, but don't think it is something to clean.

    Just want to clarify that I did not get stuck initially with the slivers. I probably handled some magnetic stuff that had the tiny metal slivers stuck on the surface and in went into the outer side of the glove. Took a few wearings of the gloves later and then ouch, seemingly for no reason. Now I know why. I guess I will try to be more careful for this time the gloves did not really seem that much worn. I got 1 year out of them, but I can see it happening I throw out gloves way too often if I forget about how magnets pick up these almost invisible splinters.

    I think at least I could try to remember to use some old rags to pick up the splinter metal fragments and toss the rag immediately after. Then and only then do I use the gloves on something that has hopefully had a significant amount of these fine metal splinters already gone to the trash.

    I remember doing what I mentioned in the immediate above paragraph some time ago when this happened before. I forgot I was just using a long magnet that I keep for finding lost magnetic hardware dropped on the ground. When not cleaning the magnet afterward, that is where I suspect all my troubles started again. May have to put a label on that magnet to remind to clean immediately after use!

    Any suggestions?
     
    #69 MEASURE TWICE, Jun 8, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  10. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 31, 2014
    Messages:
    3,207
    Likes Received:
    2,754
    Pretty common problem MT and I've not found a sure fire way to prevent it, but I use deer skin gloves that are quite supple, especially in the winter. In a commercial shop they don't last long, 6 months or so $20. My biggest problem is taking gloves off though and that's when metal really bites! Especially when you get old and the skin gets thin, lol.

    Rick C.
     
    Tom from Rubicon and fasteddy like this.
  11. Tinsmith

    Tinsmith Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 15, 2009
    Messages:
    1,011
    Likes Received:
    98
    Well, for whatever it's worth, these old, thin skin hands worked milling machines and lathes all day for years and never wore gloves using those machines. I always felt that was a safety hazard. Wore gloves fabricating sometimes and welding most of the time. The hands were full of little black sliver specks but rarely bad enough to have to dig them out. Burns and cuts handling the metal was always my reason for wearing gloves. Still have 8 of my fingers and a couple thumbs. Just lucky!

    Dan
     
  12. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,901
    Likes Received:
    755
    I have a supply of order picker gloves from my son in laws job, cloth back and rubber on the palm side. They are form fitting and fairly durable, I have used them for everything but welding, I like real leather for that.
     
    indian22 and Tom from Rubicon like this.
  13. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,901
    Likes Received:
    755
    Speaking of safety I know a lot of people (me) are older and need glasses when working with machine tools, do you wear regular glasses or safety glasses? I have bi-focal safety glasses at every tool that you should wear them at. That way I don't have an excuse to risk getting flying debris in my eyes. I have dodged a bullet twice in my life and not lost a eye doing stupid stuff, I was buffing exhaust valves when I was about 20, I took off my glasses because it was too hot. No more than five minutes later a piece of wire came off the wire wheel and stuck in my eye, I could see it between my pupil and nose. I ran to the restroom of the machine shop and looked in the mirror, the wire was sticking straight out. Being young and stupid ( I'm old now) I pulled it out. Lucky for me it didn't have a barb on the end, I had blurred vision for several day but no damage.
     
    #73 Greg58, Jun 8, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 8, 2019
  14. javy mcdees

    javy mcdees Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2018
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    58
    similar thing happened to me but a piece of metal was stuck in my eye would not come out, after some thinking under duress I found a rubber glove a magnet for picking up bolts stuck the magnet in the rubber glove and rolled around my eye and like 16 shards of metal came out my eye. Good trick I learned. eye-see.jpg
     
  15. fasteddy

    fasteddy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    6,263
    Likes Received:
    1,429
    I was cleaning a piece of rusty hardware with a wire wheel that exploded. Interesting to see your stomach and chest looking like a porcupine. As you can imagine pulling out the quills was a mite exciting.

    A leather welding apron was purchased a couple of hours later.

    Steve.
     
    indian22, Tom from Rubicon and Greg58 like this.
  16. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2011
    Messages:
    3,901
    Likes Received:
    755
    On a side note, after working with the tools we've all talked about for over 40 years or so I started having trouble with my foot, the Dr. sent me for a MRI, the first thing the asked me when filling out the paper work was was I a machinist, they sent me to have head x-rays to make sure I didn't have metal in my eyes. They told me that the magnetic power of the MRI would either pull out the metal or the eye.
     
  17. fasteddy

    fasteddy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2009
    Messages:
    6,263
    Likes Received:
    1,429
    Greg,

    That makes you wonder what happened to the first few fellas that they learned that from. That is a sobering thought for sure.

    Steve.
     
    indian22 and Tom from Rubicon like this.
  18. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2010
    Messages:
    2,281
    Likes Received:
    204
    Thanks for all the responses! I guess I will look for some new gloves with better palm face sides, even if they seem a bit stiff. The talk about eye protection I took notice about and am one of those who was told early on to use eye protection. But as kids I had near misses just like ones mentioned. I use goggles and sometimes a face shield. The face shield does not protect the neck, although I had no issue there checking out a lawn mower where some gravel was. Kill switch on lawn mower was in operable too. I got some small pebble that hit around my mouth, but only made my lip sore. I could have said I was in a bar brawl I suppose.
     
    indian22 and Tom from Rubicon like this.
  19. EZL

    EZL Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 13, 2016
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    501
    A face shield affords some protection along with glasses or safety glasses. I've had to have steel taken out of my
    eyes twice by a doctor, NO FUN! A strong magnet has also worked. A friend of mine who is a gearhead working
    on a HP '67 Dart once had to got to a eye doctor to have metal removed from his eye. He was using safety
    glasses but after working on some metal grinding it he removed the glasses and wiped his hair. He rarely wears
    a hat and he had long hair at the time and he told me that he wiped his hair with his hand and that was when he
    noticed some of the grinding metal had gotten into his eye. I guess the best solution is to wear a head covering
    and wash your hair after grinding on metal. I know why professional industrial welders always wear a skull cap
    since they are aware of these problems. If you want a real strong magnet remove a rare-earth magnet out of an
    old hardrive or order one off of Ebay. Regular eye glasses won't protect you like a set of goggles or a face mask.
     
    indian22 and javy mcdees like this.
  20. javy mcdees

    javy mcdees Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2018
    Messages:
    143
    Likes Received:
    58
    If it can happen it will happen, I wear glasses normally and still get debris in my eyes like you mentioned.
     
    indian22 likes this.

Share This Page