Bike builders that have machine tools/shops

FOG

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2019
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This thread is alive! So I'll add one more.

Got my hands on an old broke down bench grinder. 3/4 horse with 8" wheels looked promising. Yeah. I could use that.

What killed it was a bearing seized and dug a groove in the armature shaft. The fix is to turn the shaft down and press a sleeve on thereby restoring the shaft to it's original dimension.

But an armature is foot long sort of thing that needs support out there somewhere down the lathe bed and what's needed for that is a steady rest ... which my lathe didn't have. So I made my own.

Picture 143.jpg


Had my usual love/hate relationship with welding on that one. I love it when I make a pretty weld, but when it comes up ugly I hate that particular discipline with a bloody passion!
 

Tinsmith

Well-Known Member
May 15, 2009
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Maryland
Tom, thanks for the welcome. It would be great to meet someday,along with a bunch of ya'll. Sharing know how and experiences is such a great time. That's some kinda outboard motor, and would be wonderful if it were brought back to "life".

And thanks Rick C. for even remembering . It took a lot of persuasion on Silverbear's part to get me involved in this discourse, but he assured me that it was something fellas would appreciate and enjoy, and I am glad you enjoyed those tutorials he put together. As he discovered, even with the machines and tools there was a fair amount of trial and error working on things outside the comfort zone. But with his communication skills he was able to explain how to go about fabrication with real basic tools and machines.

Tom, I must make it known that I am officially a "has been". Haven't fabbed anything of significance since before FastEddy (Steve) and Silverbear (Walter) last visited. Been quite a few years at this point. I have been blessed to share the gift from the mighty "Art" that Steve is fond of referring to from time to time. I have been hesitant to try to find a new home for the machines and tools but imagine it's not too far off in the future.
I do have most all the simple machines needed to do work for fabrication items for the bikes. For the better part of 30 years I made reproductions of lighting fixtures from the 17-1800's for historic homes using tinplate and copper. Doesn't require fancy equipment, just a lot of hand work.

Anyway, If Silverbear is so inclined maybe he could locate where the threads for the gas tanks are and give us a heads up, if anyone is interested in seeing how we went about it.

Enough for this hijack.

Dan
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Yes Dan the tank build data would be a good share. I am in the proud possession of one Indian "camel back" tank thanks to "Fast Eddie" and you guys figuring it out, templates and all. I'm saving it for a V frame 1903 Indian roadster that has been on the back burner for some time. I'd like that bike to be a bit closer to a replica than a tribute. It's intended as my "Sunday go to meeting" bike, sporting crème tires and some brass.

I've said this before but those who came before us taught us all we know, but not all that they knew! Debt of gratitude & respect that can only be paid back by passing it forward each generation....

Rick C.
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
Tom, thanks for the welcome. It would be great to meet someday,along with a bunch of ya'll. Sharing know how and experiences is such a great time. That's some kinda outboard motor, and would be wonderful if it were brought back to "life".

And thanks Rick C. for even remembering . It took a lot of persuasion on Silverbear's part to get me involved in this discourse, but he assured me that it was something fellas would appreciate and enjoy, and I am glad you enjoyed those tutorials he put together. As he discovered, even with the machines and tools there was a fair amount of trial and error working on things outside the comfort zone. But with his communication skills he was able to explain how to go about fabrication with real basic tools and machines.

Tom, I must make it known that I am officially a "has been". Haven't fabbed anything of significance since before FastEddy (Steve) and Silverbear (Walter) last visited. Been quite a few years at this point. I have been blessed to share the gift from the mighty "Art" that Steve is fond of referring to from time to time. I have been hesitant to try to find a new home for the machines and tools but imagine it's not too far off in the future.
I do have most all the simple machines needed to do work for fabrication items for the bikes. For the better part of 30 years I made reproductions of lighting fixtures from the 17-1800's for historic homes using tinplate and copper. Doesn't require fancy equipment, just a lot of hand work.

Anyway, If Silverbear is so inclined maybe he could locate where the threads for the gas tanks are and give us a heads up, if anyone is interested in seeing how we went about it.

Enough for this hijack.

Dan
Not a hijack at all Dan, pleased to meet you so to speak. This thread is a good place to archive and bring into current conversation information to recent members which include me. Fabrication is a skill. It needs guys like you to bring the young ones up to our skill set. Belly up, drinks are on me.
Tom from Rubicon
 

Tinsmith

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May 15, 2009
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Maryland
Well Fellas, I don't get to spend as much time here as I used to, let alone play with the bike, but will see if I can rouse ol Silverbear and in the mean time do some looking back at what he cobbled together. I know there are fellas here with much more talent than me when it comes to fabrication of sheet metal, but through Walter's documentary style of showing what we attempted, it seemed that the folks following the thread enjoyed it and maybe it inspired some of them to try similar projects
Sure wish I was able to hang in ya'lls shops. I always enjoy learning how folks go about making and fixing things.

Steve, what a great memory you have! I know we didn't have much time to mess in the shop due to you working on your van and struggling with a very bad knee that I was unaware of. Still feel guilty of leaving you to that task in the shape you were in. I hope I'm that tough when I get you age.

Dan
 

Greg58

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May 1, 2011
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Newnan,Georgia U.S.A.
Having a good welder to use will spoil you, mine does a good job for a harbor freight unit. It took a little getting used too, the mig I used most at my old job was a miller 480v three phase unit, if a guy could open the cover and read the directions he could lay great beads. When we would test techs for advancement we would turn the settings to zero and watch what the person did, it was surprising how little some knew.
 

fasteddy

Well-Known Member
Feb 13, 2009
6,404
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British Columbia Canada
If you scroll down you will see the tool box Dan made when we were in Maryland and the Hiawatha with the tri car front end on it. This was the last time Silverbear and I were able to have a bike camp summer.

When I got home the 2-1/2 year fight to get rid of a bone infection was back on. Fortunately the second replaced knee that was loaded with antibiotics was the charm.

Steve.

https://motorbicycling.com/threads/indian-hiawatha.32998/page-28
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Hi ho Silver away! Thanks Steve for the links. Though I've read through all these old threads more than once, I got caught up over the last hour reading and looking at the photos along the way...great stuff posted. Really reading the threads from the start of the forum to current is a gold mine of ideas, whys and what ifs abound and resound to minds open to really learning from the successes and failures of others. Most of the better bikes built today are testament to this rich, recorded history.

Rick C.
 

Tinsmith

Well-Known Member
May 15, 2009
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Maryland
Well "Fog", I never got used to being called a machinist because I worked with several exceptional machinists. Didn't start until I was asked to come help at the age of 55. Had shut down my business due to my battle with arthritis, but figured I could help a friend for a bit. Think I was there for about 7 years. That definitely isn't long enough to become a machinist in my book. Fabrication was what I enjoyed most.
If you be making your own tools I'm gonna call you a machinist. Great work!

Steve, thanks for taking time to locate some of that stuff. I haven't taken time yet. I know I made a cylindrical, behind the seat mount tank at some point too, but don't know where that thread might be. I'll email Walter soon and see if he can help.
Thanks again,
Dan
 
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