Tools and tips needed for assembling Motorized Bicycle kits

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by TheRealDune, Aug 10, 2013.

  1. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    Hey there motorized bicycle fam, my Flying Horse 66/80 kit just arrived. What tools will i need for this assembly? Any tips or info is highly appreciated. Yes im an motorized bicycle NOOB but soon i will be the noobinator...that is if i can indeed assemble my kit correctly. This is my first motorized bicycle kit attempt ever so i really appreciate any info

    Newer Cranbrook 26" Cruiser
    66/80 Flying Horse 2 Stroke Kit
    Speed Carb
    Bell Kevlar 26" Tires
    Bell Slime 26" Tubes
    Bell Slime Rim Tape
    Analog Speedo(bought originally for my Peugeot 103 but never made it on)

    Thanks

    scratg
     
  2. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    if it has coaster brake, you'll need to enlarge the hole in the rear sprocket - DO NOT just throw the dust cap away

    otherwise, look on this board for the basic build help
     
    #2 crassius, Aug 10, 2013
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  3. CTripps

    CTripps Active Member

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    Hmm... (just woke up, hard to think).. let's see...
    For assembly the list includes (but is not limited to):
    • 10 mm wrench
    • 14 mm wrench
    • 8 mm wrench
    • Philips (+) screwdriver
    • Slot screwdriver
    • Chain breaker

    There are a number of other things that can be handy to have, I'm sure someone else will add to the list. For example, I like to have both a wrench and a socket/ratchet of each size at hand when working.

    Before you install the motor do some reading around here on how to pull apart, inspect and prep it. There is often manufacturing waste in the ports (a dremel type tool and collection of bits help there) that can kill the motor early. There can be some junk down in the bottom of the case too if you go that far with it.
     
    #3 CTripps, Aug 10, 2013
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  4. nathpld123

    nathpld123 New Member

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    No chain breaker is needed.

    Just file the chain you want to cut. Only file one side not both sides.

    Then break it with pin punch using hammer.
     
    #4 nathpld123, Aug 10, 2013
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  5. CTripps

    CTripps Active Member

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    The chain breaker makes it easier, but no, it isn't needed. I have a small pin press in my garage, does the job well; but I also have worked it out with a C-clamp, a dremel bit and a block with a hole drilled in it to push the pin in to. For me though, if spending five or ten bucks for the tool makes it quicker and does a better job it's worth it. (And it adds a tool to my work bench. ;))
     
    #5 CTripps, Aug 10, 2013
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  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    CT Tripps covered the major tools. Get a nice set of metric sockets and combination wrenches. Buy a torque wrench, please, and use it. You might want a set of metric Allen wrenches too.

    Best advice is buy quality tools. Not junk from discount tool suppliers. You'll be glad you spend the extra dollars for wrenches and sockets that fit and don't round off after several uses. Precision measuring tools need to be good ones especially. Torque wrenches, digital calipers, volt/ohm meters etc. are something you want to read correctly, not ball park, or that give you inconsistant readings.

    Tom
     
    #6 2door, Aug 10, 2013
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  7. dumpstercrusher

    dumpstercrusher New Member

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    you should def look into sbp front motor mount which i thought was an excellent peice to use. Or if u want to get fancy buy custom motor mounts. I was thinking http://www.kwmachineworks.com/Motorized_bikes.html for their custom motor mounts. Bit expensive but i think it looks really nice. Niw i did have a problem with my chain tensioner turning into the spokes at one point which i got rid of but i think something like a very small sprocket used as a tensioner would function better, my opinion on it if you want to spend money or fabricate ur own from maybe an old bike derailer. buy a better cdi wire to an automotive wire. thats all i can think of at the moment
     
    #7 dumpstercrusher, Aug 10, 2013
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  8. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    A hand impact driver is a really nice tool for stuck phillips head case screws.
    They are VERY easy to strip and this tool prevents this problem.
    Under $10 bucks at Harbor Freight.
    [​IMG]
     
    #8 maniac57, Aug 10, 2013
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  9. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    oh, before cutting chain, tie a string thru the link you want gone (don't recall how many times I cut wrong link)
     
    #9 crassius, Aug 10, 2013
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  10. Will122391

    Will122391 New Member

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    I got a 415h chain with mine and I see them commonly now. Those things won't break with a chain breaker, you need a dremel or grinder. So I would say make sure you have a dremel handy. Other than that you just need a drill for the throttle grip and wrenches for the bolts.
     
    #10 Will122391, Aug 11, 2013
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  11. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    I find a Sharpie felt pen to work the best for marking the exact pin on a chain link you want to remove, be sure when you break it you end up with the small end and not the connecting tabs on that end!

    I bought a cable cutter a couple years back and find I use it on every build to cut down cables that are too long like the clutch cable or brake cables, the only cable you can't cut to fit so you don't have a 'plate of spilled spaghetti' look on your handlebars is the throttle cable as it has nubs on each end.

    Get a little bottle of blue LockTight and use it on your motor and tank mount nuts.

    Get a front brake, even a simple $15 side pull caliper for the front please, it is just foolish to ride with just one brake, and a helmet too please, you are going to need both when your coaster brake self destructs right when you need it.

    One last note is screw drivers, I am almost anal about them in the shop.
    I have one set of really good ones that are ONLY to be used for turning screws, and a whole pile of what I call my 'Primitive Pete' screwdrivers, these are the ones you can use as a lever, pry bar, beating tool, etc. as their business end has already been compromised.

    If and when a good tool can't do it's intended job it gets tossed in the PP Pile and replaced as few things are worse than stripping out a new screw head because your tool was crap.
     
    #11 KCvale, Aug 11, 2013
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  12. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods New Member

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    That Sharpie idea is a good one.

    Non-worn screwdriver blades is a good thing. This strategy listed above is the sort of thing that we all should know, but hardly ever think about. I think I'm gonna try to do better on that.

    I suppose I ought to try to take better care of all of my tools, for that matter.
     
    #12 bluegoatwoods, Aug 11, 2013
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  13. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Never let your wife near your tools. I found one of my Snap-On drivers stuck in a flower pot. She used it to tighten a clamp on a hanging basket and left it there. :)

    Tom
     
    #13 2door, Aug 11, 2013
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  14. Harley59

    Harley59 New Member

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    I take exception to that, CT uses my tools and I use his. What you need to do is give her her own tool box then explain the proper care and use of the tools you have given to her. DO NOT USE THIS AS ANY KIND OF SPECIAL DAY GIFT, you will regret it for as long as she remembers it. If this does not work grab her best pair of scissors (or other steel favourite tool) and do the same thing.
     
    #14 Harley59, Aug 11, 2013
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  15. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    HAHAHAHA,nice one!!! I will not soon forget.
     
    #15 TheRealDune, Aug 12, 2013
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  16. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    I am having trouble getting the FH sprocket onto my rear hub. Ive tried using a triangle metal hand held file. There has got to be a better easier way though...
     
    #16 TheRealDune, Aug 12, 2013
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  17. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Specifically what part of the sprocket installation are you having trouble with?
    There are some tricks to it but once installed correctly it will serve you well.

    Look through this and see if it helps. Lots to read on the subject > http://www.google.com/cse?cx=partne....tab=0&gsc.q=sprocket installation&gsc.page=1

    Tom
     
    #17 2door, Aug 12, 2013
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  18. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    My sprocket did not fit onto the rear hub so i had to file some of the center hole of sprocket to make it fit. Once i did that i noticed that rear sprocket is not laying completely onto rear hub. Hope that makes sense
     
    #18 TheRealDune, Aug 12, 2013
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  19. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    In fact about half of sprocket is not completely on hub, i believe the reason is because the sprocket is down as far as it can go onto hub. I look near spokes on rear hub and sprocket is completely flush with spokes(in other words sprocket is rubbing against spokes) So if i use both of the black carbon rings the sprocket will be completely floating above the rear hub....im baffled
     
    #19 TheRealDune, Aug 12, 2013
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  20. TheRealDune

    TheRealDune New Member

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    #20 TheRealDune, Aug 12, 2013
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