New vs Old! Vintage or High Tech.

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Motorbikermark, Dec 30, 2011.

  1. Motorbikermark

    Motorbikermark New Member

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    Ive got a theory about speed with these things.....If I build something that looks modern and new then as far as any driver on the road is considered I'm just some dang fool on a bicycle with a motor on it tying up traffic, And it won't matter how fast it goes because motorist now days are too caught up in where they have to be and that you are keeping them from that! However if you build something that looks vintage enough then you can spur their curiosity, now they slow down for you. Also people don't expect it to be fast because as you know nothing went fast till well into the 60's, and if you take it to town its a conversation piece and people are interested. I built a brand new 2011 Huffy Nel Lusso all shiny and new, and people asked about it and I was really enjoying it, But everyone kept asking if I built it or bought it like that? So I took it wet sanded it with 1000 grit, put a couple small dents in the fenders, added a few thin layers of flat black, machine finish bronze and a speck of red primer over the whole bike heavier on the chrome. And added some thin spray can stenciling, And wet sanded it again paying extra attention to areas where it would receive the most wear. I must say at this point my wife was very skeptical and thought I had lost my mind! Why would you spend all that time building that thing just to beat the crap out of it scratch it up and make it look like its a hundred years old!!!! All I could say is "thank you honey that was the best thing you could have said". Then I was outside putting the finishing touches on it when some old timer walked by and says "Well thats an old one...Does it run?" needless to say I'm very happy with the finished product. I must admit I feel a sense of accomplishment everytime someone ask "What years that thing?" Best thing now is I can ride it and not worry about it getting scratched up or dented, Because the more that happens to it the more it adds to the authenticity of the bike. Whatever you ride enjoy it and don't let anyone take your joy out of it!

    God Speed, Mark.shft.
     
    #1 Motorbikermark, Dec 30, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  2. cannonball2

    cannonball2 Active Member

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    I with you on this concept. When I was a kid everything we had was well used/beat up. Our thing back then was to make it look as new as possible. The guy that could do it the best was given great respect. So all my life I have restored every thing. In the right circles the respect is still there. However the gen public hasnt a clue what they are looking at for the most part, unless it is somehow maybe out of place. I still find it hard to go the opposite direction from 100%, but love the examples that are well done. I have begun to experiment a bit with "patina". It is literally an art, you either have it/see it or you dont. I have friends that build scale warbird R/C aircraft. They spend hours making them perfect then "weather" them with effects that look like dents, bare metal, oil stains etc. It takes a true master to make it look right. I took a new cheapy analog speedo as my first project and learned a lot about making it look old. Im hooked now. Maybe some of the masters at this could post here. Heres a link to pic of a bike I would love to have. Its a fairly late model Sportster. ONE BRAND NEW SATIN FRONT BRAKE ROTOR Bobber Chopper Harley Rat Bike | eBay
     
  3. The_Aleman

    The_Aleman New Member

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    Great story! I know exactly what you're talking about, except my case is reversed.

    When my bike looked like THIS, I was often asked what year it was and who makes it. Most of the parts on it went so well together, that it did kind of look like a factory machine. Especially with orig paint and the patina it had. I got a lot of disappointed "oh..." when I told em it was just a late 90's beach cruiser with a chinese motor kit on it.

    Now my bike is a much different machine, and no one has asked me that question. It's always "how fast it go?" and "did you make that or buy it like that?". It's still a beach cruiser with a Chinese motor, but it's a completely different animal now. Much cleaner and more high tech, only parts that point to vintage times is the Sturmey Archer hubs, and they are modern versions.
     
  4. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    I have two builds, which I love because if one goes down, I can take my time fixing it and ride the other. Both are set up to roll with 27" and 700C big wheels with narrow tires- both of them I built as lightweight as possible- to be able to get up to my 2nd story apartment and to less strain the motor and ease the working on. So they have nice alloy parts.

    I don't plan on any others- these are dialed in now and I only want to do what repairs are needed now.


    But if i had to do it again- I'd probably build one really nice fast state-of the art to get me where I want- my 66 build can keep up with traffic if I want on most surface streets- at nearly their speed otherwise, I'm not in their way much. And getting the bike out the door and around town is as fast as in the car for most trips I make- I hit the ground rolling, and roll it right up to the door of where I'm going- no looking for a parking spot- if traffic is backed up, I'm just going around it.-

    but I'd build the other as a "junker" to keep outside- basic cruiser frame and wheels- set up with LARGE baskets front and rear-for lots of groceries and other stuff. This building has no outside shelter at all so it would just have a plastic covering- (best one- Wal-Mart lawn tractor cover- VERY large and sturdy, and sells for only about ten bucks- not always in the outdoor section, but usually in the spring- got one on the scooter outside, I seldom ride). I'd still probably make sure I at least had a bilet intake and 66 speed carb, and alloy rims- and perpendicular running bars and grips- but no other frills otherwise. I wouldn't have to worry so much about it, or haul one up and down the stairs every day.

    http://motorbicycling.com/f15/smooth-silk-silver-belle-35916.html

    This one now also has a 3 piece alloy pedal crank as well as the motor crank
    http://motorbicycling.com/f48/changed-bolted-sprocket-34307.html
     
    #4 Nashville Kat, Dec 30, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  5. Motorbikermark

    Motorbikermark New Member

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    Heres some before and after shots of my bike.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    #5 Motorbikermark, Dec 30, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  6. Motorbikermark

    Motorbikermark New Member

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    [​IMG]
     
    #6 Motorbikermark, Dec 30, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 30, 2011
  7. Motorbikermark

    Motorbikermark New Member

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  8. culvercityclassic

    culvercityclassic Well-Known Member

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    Love that bike on ebay...I have built some lookers but alway fall back to the bare metal, rust and the vintage look. One of my fav bikes is the Dyno I built and just clear coated the frame. The tank has all the weld marks left as is...

    http://motorbicycling.com/f45/ccc-rat-rod-build-completed-18334.html

    The bike I just finished gets more looks than any other bike I have built, its raw and vintage with some modern touches... that look never gets old...

    http://motorbicycling.com/f38/custom-frame-board-track-thumper-32314-13.html
     
  9. cannonball2

    cannonball2 Active Member

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    GREAT looking bikes CCC! Like the After pic much better MBMark. I saw a VW bug on ebay a while back that was done up as a surfers ride. It was in the stock white but had been made to look like it was rusted from being at the beach. Growing up around Daytona Beach and being a surfer, rusted cars were part of every day life. This thing was so well done you wouldnt know it was art work until you tried to poke a rust hole. A lot of the bobbers are acid washed and that gives a great effect, but the rust is real especially on fasteners. The effect on the VW was very real with no down side, would love to have a bike done that way.
     
  10. Motorbikermark

    Motorbikermark New Member

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    I spent alot of time in Daytona area. Worked on a yacht (Sail Boat) for the developer of Spruce Creek Fly In. Parents live in Edgewater. I'm looking forward to taking the MB down there next time I go to see them and riding on flat ground.
     
  11. cannonball2

    cannonball2 Active Member

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    That is a great area for an MB. We used to use the Spruce Creek airport for fly ins in the early 70s. Wasnt a soul on it then. Love and miss the area!
     
  12. rustycase

    rustycase Gutter Rider

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    CB2, u can do an awful lot of vintage look antique-ing with an airbrush and the fancy paints the model RR guys use for their trains... probably want to shoot some clear over it, though, to make it WX proof.

    I looked at the harley bobber you posted...
    Seems it's the tank/seat and the front wheel/tire that are the primary points of focus.
    From my own experience, there is a MAJOR difference in FEEL and handling when running a fat front tire like that. It's kinda interesting, in riding.
    Most my time spent on the Vtwins was with a 21 avon speedmaster mark II up front, and in the end I seemed to like a 3.50x19 universal tread best, but when I mounted up a 5.10x 16 it was a lot of fun! Kinda like motoring a steam roller! lol it was a lot more substantial and stable feel.
    I ran 15's, 16's, and 18's on the rear at various times and rarely ran with a seat. I sat pretty low.

    Try the fattest front tire you can find on the front for a different, old-timey feel. Maybe something from moped-land, or a small mc???

    Best
    rc

    ...also, the creme colored or clay colored tires seem to make the biggest difference in the many pics I've looked at of mabs with a retro style. It would be too hard to keep creme colored tires clean though! lol

    Sheesh! I keep finin' two cents in my pocket! :)
     

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