How to Add suspension

MrLarkins

HS Math Teacher
Jun 17, 2008
487
0
0
45
Arkansas
Ok, I have a normal rigid frame old school mountain bike w/ motor. I'd like some suspension added. What do I need to look for?
 

saetta

New Member
Jul 29, 2008
156
0
0
Central Missouri
if you do not have suspension front forks, add them. also add a saddle with dual coil springs and you will feel the benefit. I did both of these things to my suspension-less cruiser with positive results. see pic.
 

Attachments

Last edited:

OSCAR383

New Member
Jul 22, 2008
243
0
0
36
WEST FRANKFORT, IL
i think they also make seat post tubes with shocks in them, but ive not owned one personally and would worry about them breaking . you could always put a springer fork on front they look good on some mountain bikes.

but im bias cuz all my bikes have springers:D
 

Nomad

New Member
Aug 4, 2008
188
0
0
U.S.A.
if you do not have suspension front forks, add them. also add a saddle with dual coil springs and you will feel the benefit. i did both of these things to my suspension-less cruiser with positive results. see pic.
Nice lookin' bike... where could I get "suspension/shock, type fork?.
 

wheelbender6

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2008
4,016
143
63
TX
Google "bicycle swap meet" on the internet and find one in your area. They are normally in the fall and spring. Remove your rigid fork and take it to the swap meet with you. Steerer diameter, length (especially if it is a threaded fork), etc must match your frame.
Getting a fork that fits on the first try will save you more time to grade math tests.
 

wheelbender6

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2008
4,016
143
63
TX
Many competitive mountain bikers don't like suspension seatposts because they bob up and down when pedalling hard while seated. That shouldn't be a problem on a motorized bike. You can get cheap ones for around $20 and really good ones for far north of $100.
I would not get one of the cheapest ones, because the bolt that holds the seat in place doesn't stay tight very well and the engine vibration will compound the problem. As with suspension forks, take your rigid seatpost with you, even if buying from a shop, to ensure you get the right diameter.

If you have a bad back, any form of suspension is worth the trouble and expense.
 

Dave31

Active Member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
I started to make a suspension seat post but realized it was going to make the seat to tall for me. So my plan is when I get the time is to make one for my height. It will not be as fancy as this one, all I need is the right spring which I have not had time to look for yet.

This is a shock off something....don't know where it came from. Could be a rear shock from a bicycle? I think it would work great for taller riders, I can ride with it but it is a little uncomfortable for me when I have to pedal.

But, I thought it would help you guy's get some ideals...



 

the_edge150

Dealer
Aug 21, 2008
289
0
0
Monrovia,CA
I started to make a suspension seat post but realized it was going to make the seat to tall for me. So my plan is when I get the time is to make one for my height. It will not be as fancy as this one, all I need is the right spring which I have not had time to look for yet.

This is a shock off something....don't know where it came from. Could be a rear shock from a bicycle? I think it would work great for taller riders, I can ride with it but it is a little uncomfortable for me when I have to pedal.

But, I thought it would help you guy's get some ideals...



dude that would be perfect for me, i'm 6'5 :) and from what i have found is the best suspension set-up for a MB is oil-filled shocks in the front, and a seat with dual coil springs
 

sojudave

New Member
Oct 18, 2008
189
2
0
austin tx
Ok, I have a normal rigid frame old school mountain bike w/ motor. I'd like some suspension added. What do I need to look for?
like these other guys said. it's as easy as picking out what kind of forks you want. Mt bike shock forks? Classic springer? lowrider springer? Whatever you want to add. make sure that the neck stem of the forks mate up with the tube one the frame. This generally isn't a problem since most neck tubes are the same length and diameter.