Hi from the UK - INDIAN Board Tracker tribute, my first build

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Heh, heh a man of my own heart for certain. As to style Pete you know I'm a fan of the board track type & ride them that way, with the concession to bars being rotated slightly up. Though I don't build many roadsters I have in the past and I appreciate the style very much in the work of others. When lighting and the niceties of road legal bikes are added I actually prefer the roadster look or at least a greatly modified board track style that to me looks the part of a pre 1920's cafe racer design and that's exactly how I think of them when a nice example shows up.

As to paint I seldom use the stuff & prefer just metal, some paint here and there along with a bit of polish and or plating. Not over done. Again this is my style preference, but I could name dozens of spectacular builds, just on this forum, that are completely painted/plated & are quite beautiful.

The fender is nicely done & I agree with Tom there is a lot to it so my preference would be a bit shorter but not "bobbed" for a roadster though it seems when I do use a rear guard it becomes really brief. There is elegance in a full fender or a set front and back & if I lived in a climate that was blessed with much rain I would run fenders on both ends of the beast. I'd not skimp on the design or proper fitting of a "safe" front guard though. Motorcycle guards are the standard that I look to for bicycle sheet metal as well. Your rear guard is obviously a robust piece & I'm certain you will mount it securely. A poor front splash can jam up and cause terrible accidents not the riders fault unless he is also the fabricator of a weak design.

Today starts a nice warming trend here in Indian Territory U.S. of A and I hope to use my time wisely and enjoy it.

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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5" diameter aluminium tube and louvered stainless ventilation fascias arrived in today's mail, so work on the Battery Box for the latest build was able to get underway.
Saw the vent covers on eBay, and after checking dimensions, realized that when mated to 5" dia tube, they would make excellent end covers for a cool battery box. Those louvers also help maintain the bike's horizontal grille theme.
Used one of the covers as a jig to locate three mounting tabs cut from 10mm x 2mm aluminium strip left over from the gas tank's bands whilst brazing them in place.inside the aluminium tube using Alu-build300 rods and my MAPP torch. The tabs were first drilled/tapped M4 to accept the securing screws for the covers.
The battery itself will fit inside the tube, sat in an cradlle of 3" x 1" aluminium channel, to which it will be securely fastened with a stretchable rubber battery strap. The alloy channel and battery strap, together with another pair of Munsen rings which I'll use to fasten the battery box to the top & seat tubes, are due to get here tomorrow according to eBay. Gives me the sense I'm running this operation on the 'Just In Time' principle. ;)

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Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Alu-build300 rods, where were they 40 years some ago? I have an aluminum punt, we call em Jon Boats. Any way mine developed a flex crack. I had to engage a professional welder to TIG a repair. Sorry for the aside Pete. :)

So am reading the weld rod flows from 715 to 735F whereas aluminum melts at 1,221F. Just expressing my ignorance.
Did you Scotchbrite the tube exterior after brazing on the mounting flanges?
Carry on Flash Gordon of the twenty second century. Your rocket is a rider.
Tom
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Tom,
The 300 in the Alu-build300 rods refers to its melting point. 300 degrees may not sound all that hot, but results in a joint as strong as the parent metal.
On a couple of previous builds, I've used two types of aluminium brazing rods for building the tanks. Can't recall the name of the other kind of rod, but it's melting point was 700-odd degrees and was as hard as iron to file when cleaning up a joint. The Alu-build 300 files much easier. The higher melting point rods require the jointing areas to be vigorously cleaned with a stainless wire brush first.
300 degree rods don't require wire brushing of jointing surfaces.
I lightly sanded the jointing surfaces of the aluminium parts and the exterior of the tube prior to performing the joints. I did lightly pre-tin the joint area inside the tube with a film of Alu-build. TIP: Always pre-tin where possible to promote better solder flow..
The aluminium tube exterior was untouched after joints were completed. No Scotchbriting.
I'll admit to f_ _ _ing-up the first tab when I partly melted it while applying the torch's heat directly to it prior to introducing the Alu-build rod. After making a replacement tab, I then decided it would be best to apply the heat to the outside of the tube, allow the heat to be conducted through to the tab, apply the Alu-build rod to the joint, then watch it flow. That approach worked perfect.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Pete you discovered and applied a basic technique of welding, regardless the process, MIG, TIG, braze; when joining thick to thin 75% (at least). of the heat is directed to the more robust heat sink. I also really like louvers so the battery box (though I've not used louvers on a motor bike) is the cherry atop...

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Battery box shell and mounts completed. Really happy how this mini project turned out. The louvres really suit the bike. Used a Munsen Ring to mount the box to the seat tube, and what I now know is called a Hospital Bracket - according to TNJ Pipe Fittings eBay store - to mount it to the top tube.
Front brake and speedo cables came in today too - along with a nice surprise from India... a really rather cool diving helmet. Four day international (free) shipping via DHL, with zero customs duty to pay. For the price, this must be the bargain of the century.

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PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Tom,
Hospital bracket has a single through hole, which I tapped and it's secured via a bolt inside the battery box's tube.

If you thought that neat little Indian-made brass sextant/sundial you bought as a prezzie for one of your family members was great value for money, you should go on eBay and check out the dive helmets. H_ _l of a bang for the buck.
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Pete, the Indian-made brass sextant/sundial was well received by Mona's brother David.
David is a collector.
Possibly compensating for the loss of his mother when he was six. Every bit of ready cash purchases things.
Always of value. He knows about arbitrage, what he could gain but instead keeps collecting. Last time we went into David's house. He slept on a couch because his bed was burdened with swords.
I have no leg to stand on. I tell Mona i would like to be at my auction.
Thirty years ago or so, I attended an auction. The Gent settling his life was present. All his gardening tools were oiled and spotless. I got a few of his. I care for.
Tom
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Well done Pete! Now you've made the cut this is a great look for this bike design and Tom's right on with tire change. comment.
I'm still favoring a bobbed rear for the Ol' Crow V-electric...so many projects left undone and to begin.

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Speedo came in yesterday's mail. One of only two (primary) mph offerings on eBay. Only one which also featured illuminated lights for headlamps/blinkers/neutral functions. Everything else was kph. Didn't exactly realize it was this large. But needs must - so I'm going with it. Just need to fab a custom mount.
Shame only one of the two plugs for the speedo's 'lectrics was compatible with the plugs on the handlebar controls loom. I now have two FEMALE 9-pin plugs instead of a MALE/FEMALE. Buggery! Hate pi - - ing about with wiring.
22mm (7/8") cnc'd alloy brackets for the rear indicators also arrived yesterday. These fit the bill nicely.

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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Pete I find the size about perfect, the early designers were not much into miniature fittings for motos or autos either and with nice clamps, which will compliment the brass pump clamps, the speedo will be stellar! A brass trim to the face of the instrument would make a nice match of things as well, to replace the chrome...but now I'm just being picky.

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Awaiting delivery of the new build's wiring loom and various electrical gubbins such as cdi/flasher/headlight auto-on relay/coil etc. so quiet on the bike front for a few days.

It'll just be like any other day tomorrow, but it's special for me 'cause darlin' wife Jen turns 74. Sadly, Jen will not be aware it's her birthday, but to celebrate the occasion, I've spent part of today freshening-up her pink hair tint AND committed to adopting a new family member. Little miss 'Mischa' (pictured) won't be joining us till May 25th, or shortly after, when she's 9 weeks old and able to leave mum-cat.
The last 5 months since Tilly, our just-short-of 20 year old vintage calico passed, has been the first time in the 47 years Jen and I have spent together that we haven't had a cat (or several cats) rule our lives. Feels like there's a definite hole in my life right now, so I'm counting the days till the 25th when long-haired light calico Mischa gets here to fill that void.

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