Cranbrook Springer Forked BTR YD100 Replica Build (without fabrication)

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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If I think I understand you used a hole saw to cut the round tubes to get the new pieces to weld in place.

I have used to drill in just flat surfaces of metal and some damn hard oak wood 1/2 wine barrel planter drain holes. I broke the bit for the center of the hole saw, but found another to use anyway.

I think keep checking to see if the chuck is tight. I wish they still had the key type, my hand affected by spinal compressed disk makes grasping the chuck with out key very bad for me. I expect I will make a strap wrench to get leverage for keyless tools. Just I don't want too much torque and break the chuck. Happy medium?

Annoyed the heck out of neighbors with the screech on metal drilling back in the 90's making a boat rack for my truck. Had to let cool many times with the 7/16 thick angle iron and also with the wood same. Wood about inch thick meant lots of heat. Careful not to start a fire.

Metal cutting fluid a lot along with time to cool often while drilling. I would let the drill spin with no load to let bit cool faster. Each time I drilled a bit and stopped I would brush away shavings and knock the shaving out of the hole saw.

Doing this stuff by hand can wear you out. Thinking of breaking out the drill press but the barrels would have to be held in place for drilling which would take time. Just their weight on the ground kept the steady for hand drilling.

Come to think of it time is what I have now so no need to be so fast as to hurt myself. Think maybe my handle Measure Twice might change to Mechanical Advantage?

You have a nice project coming along, will be watching!

PS: HF has a nice set 5ea of two sided pilot drills for cheap, and they work really well!
 

Nightster

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Mar 3, 2021
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If I think I understand you used a hole saw to cut the round tubes to get the new pieces to weld in place.

I have used to drill in just flat surfaces of metal and some damn hard oak wood 1/2 wine barrel planter drain holes. I broke the bit for the center of the hole saw, but found another to use anyway.

I think keep checking to see if the chuck is tight. I wish they still had the key type, my hand affected by spinal compressed disk makes grasping the chuck with out key very bad for me. I expect I will make a strap wrench to get leverage for keyless tools. Just I don't want too much torque and break the chuck. Happy medium?

Annoyed the heck out of neighbors with the screech on metal drilling back in the 90's making a boat rack for my truck. Had to let cool many times with the 7/16 thick angle iron and also with the wood same. Wood about inch thick meant lots of heat. Careful not to start a fire.

Metal cutting fluid a lot along with time to cool often while drilling. I would let the drill spin with no load to let bit cool faster. Each time I drilled a bit and stopped I would brush away shavings and knock the shaving out of the hole saw.

Doing this stuff by hand can wear you out. Thinking of breaking out the drill press but the barrels would have to be held in place for drilling which would take time. Just their weight on the ground kept the steady for hand drilling.

Come to think of it time is what I have now so no need to be so fast as to hurt myself. Think maybe my handle Measure Twice might change to Mechanical Advantage?

You have a nice project coming along, will be watching!

PS: HF has a nice set 5ea of two sided pilot drills for cheap, and they work really well!

Thanks for the nice compliment and the HF tip.

My problem was I was drilling angles and a quarter inch pilot bit was still trying to cut through the bottom of the tube as one side of the hole saw started making contact with the tube. That’s what snapped a couple of pilot bits on my hole saw.

And I agree I quit applying so much pressure and let the drill do a little bit more work for me.

But this is great, I’m learning to work with metal and I’m having a blast.

Thanks for following along
 

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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No doubt it is difficult at angles, especially if the cutter is not contacting in a flat surface and you only have partial cutting while the rest is in the air so to speak without back pressure. I'm afraid of stuff like this and would rather a drill press.

Dremel with cutter wheel or Die Grinder using speed control with cutter wheel I have used to make cuts along markings. I also save cutter wheels up to a point. No so that there very small and easily crack and fly off. I use a helmet that protects neck area and a leather apron I got for MIG welding. The various sizes after being used some then have various radius angles I find handy. Too large a cutter sometimes also does not fit where I need to grind away a cut.

HF Die Grinder I have I use with the speed control as I feel the grinder would self destruct otherwise. Speed control only consists of a variable resistor in side I think I saw when I got it. It really only adjust a little at the end of the range which is sucky, but the grinder motor probably can't work properly past a point slowed to.

Note in the past I had some one asking to borrow the grinder to use to fix a car key starter where the person that was said to give this guy the job, had lost the key to the car. Not really judging that, but what was he going to do was grind the area where the key goes in on the steering column. I saw that there was no way for it to contact a completely flat surface. In addition there was metal and plastic which I would feel would probably end badly with the whole grinder flying wildly. The guy was a bit upset I did not loan the grinder to him.

I know of some one else that used a grinder wheel for cutting tile and had a slight mishap with a cut through a few layers of leg skin. I suspect using the leg guards they have may have been best. Rental places like where I worked for a short while pressed for people to use them and they were free with a grinder rental.
 

Nightster

Well-Known Member
Mar 3, 2021
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63
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Texas
No doubt it is difficult at angles, especially if the cutter is not contacting in a flat surface and you only have partial cutting while the rest is in the air so to speak without back pressure. I'm afraid of stuff like this and would rather a drill press.

Dremel with cutter wheel or Die Grinder using speed control with cutter wheel I have used to make cuts along markings. I also save cutter wheels up to a point. No so that there very small and easily crack and fly off. I use a helmet that protects neck area and a leather apron I got for MIG welding. The various sizes after being used some then have various radius angles I find handy. Too large a cutter sometimes also does not fit where I need to grind away a cut.

HF Die Grinder I have I use with the speed control as I feel the grinder would self destruct otherwise. Speed control only consists of a variable resistor in side I think I saw when I got it. It really only adjust a little at the end of the range which is sucky, but the grinder motor probably can't work properly past a point slowed to.

Note in the past I had some one asking to borrow the grinder to use to fix a car key starter where the person that was said to give this guy the job, had lost the key to the car. Not really judging that, but what was he going to do was grind the area where the key goes in on the steering column. I saw that there was no way for it to contact a completely flat surface. In addition there was metal and plastic which I would feel would probably end badly with the whole grinder flying wildly. The guy was a bit upset I did not loan the grinder to him.

I know of some one else that used a grinder wheel for cutting tile and had a slight mishap with a cut through a few layers of leg skin. I suspect using the leg guards they have may have been best. Rental places like where I worked for a short while pressed for people to use them and they were free with a grinder rental.
You are correct in the angles and using the hole saw. The o my saving grace is the Pilot joke once drilled keeps things alighted fairly well.

Hate to say this but my drill press is in storage as well. I notched these with a hand drill. Crazy but it worked...
 
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Nightster

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You might try using one of these. I've borrowed a friends and It will hold tubing firmly at an angle. If no one has mentioned it cutting oil is a must to get easy cuts.

Steve.

I like it!!!

If I didn’t have a couple dozen pieces of Sheetrock to hand Saturday I would be hitting up the HF. May still find a way to get over there this weekend.

Thanks Steve
 

Nightster

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Mar 3, 2021
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Well I happened to pass by a local mom and pop HW store today and bought another hole saw. Let’s just say these angles I am trying notch now will have to be done differently than a hole saw. The first two were not that severe. When I tried to go 45° the bit just couldn’t take it.

So between my angle grinder and a cutting wheel for it, it’s gonna have to get done that way.

Here’s as far as I got before the hole saw started failing. I was probably pushing to much. Live and learn
 

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Nightster

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Mar 3, 2021
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So I made a little more progress tonight and notched one side of the bottom tube. Came out pretty decent, a little more cleanup and we will be good. And as I already said, it’s Sheetrock weekend so the bike will have to wait til possibly Sunday evening for more progress.

Here’s what I did tonight.
 

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MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,531
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CA
You might try using one of these. I've borrowed a friends and It will hold tubing firmly at an angle. If no one has mentioned it cutting oil is a must to get easy cuts.

Steve.

Back on post 324 cutting fluid. I have a quart plastic bottle so old that I think I'll put it into another plastic bottle. Not sure the stuff ages well, but the plastic bottle may get brittle.