Completely new... Help?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by cartersummerell, Dec 11, 2011.

  1. cartersummerell

    cartersummerell New Member

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    Hello,

    Im totally new to the forum and also the idea of a motorized bicycle. I would like to build one but I have certain questions....
    1- will I be able to go up hills?
    2- whats the fastest these things go?
    3- why are pedals still on the bikes?
    4- whats the easiest engine to "cannibalize" ?
    5- do people use gears (from a mountain bike or something)?

    Thanks! Im excited for this haha
    -Carter
     
  2. Ibedayank

    Ibedayank New Member

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    read every section on this forum and all the posts in them
    then you will have your answers

    as far as pedals ....... a BICYCLE has pedals a motorcycle does not
     
  3. 5-7HEAVEN

    5-7HEAVEN Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the club, Carter.

    All of your questions will be answered when you do more research on what you're interested in.
     
  4. cartersummerell

    cartersummerell New Member

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    I have looked all over the forums and read alot, but my first questions are these...

    What are the advantages to running a 2 stroke compared to a 4?
    I know that the 2 stroke gets a little bit faster but the 4 stroke can sustain an alright speed for a long time.
    as far as my questions about the gears, still stands...
    and same with the pedals. but I want to build something like a board tracker, im just not sure where to start or what frame...
     
  5. cartersummerell

    cartersummerell New Member

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    also do chainsaw engines work well?
     
  6. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    It's been proven that the 2-strokes can run at full throttle all day long. ;)
     
  7. kolomootro

    kolomootro New Member

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    1 yes you will probobly be able to go up hills with chinese kits with 44 t sprocket the kits come with.

    2 depends, kits should go 30 more or less.

    3you have to start the engine with pedals or if your engine has a pull rope its still nice to have your feet not dangling.


    4.idk i havnt really tried

    5 yes they sell shift kits but they cost money.


    4 stroke you dont have to mix oil 2 stroke you do.
    if your not gonna use kit then it all depends.
    (
     
    #7 kolomootro, Dec 11, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  8. yodar

    yodar New Member

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    see my italicized inserts following your questions
    contact me off list for PDF copies of assembly instructions I have filed away
    [email protected]

    yodar
     
  9. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    2 stroke Vs. 4 cycle-

    Personally the more I've used the China Girl 2 strokes, the more I like em for a bicycle motor-

    1. Cheaper initial cost and parts
    2. They fit between most pedals- have to go wider crank for a heavier 4 stroke that carries oil internally and needs valves beside the head.
    3. on the negative, they are a little noisier I think, but noise can be minimized
    4. 2 strokes need less "power conversion" apparatus. If you planned to use a shift kit to take advantage of the bicycle gears with the motor, this might equal out some, but you can run a chain straight from the 2 stroke to the back wheel gear, no fuss no muss.

    I have a scooter, with 16" moped size wheels even, but I find my motorized bicycle so much more convenient to use, and part of that is that I like to cut the power and pedal around. after a long racing career I keep the seat up at normal peddling height and have narrow 700 C and 27" tires so that I have a fairly viable peddling bicycle otherwise- and it rolls and rolls for blocks after I cut the motor off.

    Being in Florida too you'll probably have no problems with the authorities, but please don't be a maniac. as to your query about speed, when you really go at it and if you want to use a bike for practical transportation, you may find that a decent cruising speed is more what you're after as opposed to the top end- The little motors scream quite a bit wide open- With some bigger gearing (that means smaller sprocket in the back) you can be at 25 or 30 without opening the motor up full and taxing it so- it's your motor and you don't want to repair it all the time right?

    I've had good results with a 36 on a 66 motor, but a 50cc handles a 39 pretty well and still moves along nicely, with a lighter and quieter, but obviously less powerful motor. See my sound comparison video in the video threads

    If it were me, and unless you're a super motor mechanic, I'd start out simple and stay to a beaten kit path whether 2 or 4 stroke- I've paid more attention to the bike itself although I do have two builds with both sizes of China Girl 2 strokers- Wheels that roll and tires that don't vibrate like beach tires do are big fators for me- I use shock seat posts and have a shock fork on the faster bike.

    I like to use alloy BMX bars with a slight rise for my bad back but most importantly that have a solid perpenicular grip on them- ya gotta hang on!

    A billet intake really helps the motor perform as intended as does a newer 66 speed carb when using a newer 66 motor.

    My bikes are lightweight so I can push them up and down a flight of apartment stairs, but I wouldn't have the any other way- that's why I like three piece alloy crank conversions and the alloy bars and stems, and always alloy rims for the relatively smooth Florida streets.

    A 415 TRIKE chain weighs little more than half the standard kit chain, although the same width, and really rolls quietly- a real difference peddling too..santa(^)
     

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    #9 Nashville Kat, Dec 11, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2011
  10. Rocky_Motor

    Rocky_Motor New Member

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    That looks real nice! Except your rear brake. That looks rather frightening D:

    My goal for my bike is to make it very peddleable too. Finals week though... Can't work on the bike for a bit.. )=
     
  11. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    The pedals are nessesary because the engines aren't very powerful & you still have to pedal the bike to get it rolling (& help it get up to speed); & also, if you remove the pedals, it's no longer a motorized bicycle... it's now a scooter & falls into a whole different catagory with the law.
     
  12. cartersummerell

    cartersummerell New Member

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    Thanks guys! thats really helpful. I keep yall updated on my decisions!

    Thanks for everything guys
     
  13. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    I know I'm late to chime in, but I thought there might still be room to contribute.
    - Re hills: how well your bike takes hills depends on 1) how you've geared the rear wheel, and 2) how powerful your engine actually is. For example, I have a 2-stroke HT that has been port matched and the carburettor has been tweaked and messed with. I run a 38T rear sprocket and I climb modest hills like they're not there, and some steeper ones - I just give her more gas.
    - Re engines: that is very much a matter of personal preference. Go with what you know best and would rather have. If you're more comfortable working on 4-strokes, those may be easier for you. I find 2-strokes easier myself, but I can't say I've ever HAD to work on mine. I've done the usual "dialing in", changed a plug, etc. But mine's so durned reliable I've never needed to do any emergency stuff. Truthfully: my bike is more reliable than my Dodge Caravan, and that says a lot to me. Whichever you choose, you will find experienced help, support, and boatloads of knowledge here on this forum.
    - Re helmets: I wasn't going to preach, really I wasn't. I just saw it wasn't mentioned and thought I'd bring it up. If you were to ask me, I would tell you I believe they work. There are conditions and circumstances where a helmet will save your life. But remember: it is, and always will be, your choice. If you choose one, get a good one - DOT certified at least. If not, hey, what can we say? You're an adult. You're entitled.
     
    #13 Allen_Wrench, Dec 11, 2011
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2011

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