Bike builders that have machine tools/shops

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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CA
I welded a socket onto the end of an expendable wrench. It was so I could get into an area on an old sewing machine I got gears to replace on it. I had to cut it's depth of the socket a bit more when it still would get into the area needed to loosen the bolt holding in the upper shaft. I cut some off and though a bit too late, I could have beefed up the area around the socket with a rosette weld of sorts. I didn't think of it then. The socket then was able to reach inside and grab onto the bolt head. Only so much force and no budging the bolt, but yeah the socket rounded a bit. Still not giving up I took to die grinder cut wheel and opened up access to the access hole to the bolt head for a regular socket by wasting some of the casting in the way. It was a good idea and I also tried to guard the grind/cut dust with towel an tape. The I had a bear of a time loosening the bolt and it came out. The shaft was seemingly press fit as well. Here is where it would have also been thinking better with like a flywheel puller kind of deal in reverse. With the shaft sticking out one end of the machine and grab it and brace against the end of where the flywheel was removed and pull the shaft out. I did not do that at first and tried with a screwdriver in between the casting frame and connecting rod on the shaft. When I did not see till later I had also pushed on another smaller connecting rod and cracked it. SO BE WARNED. Anyway I have 2 extra gears that I can sell on Ebay, and a new machine on order. It has not just feed below the foot plate, but a so called walking foot feed on the top surrounding the needle. Thick material and multiple layers are handled much better. The walking foot works on forward and reverse as well as straight and ziz-zag. Really though the welding and grinding equipment I have has now been tested and still works! I actually got a nice sizzle sound and didn't melt the parts I custom made. It is just they modified the machine and didn't allow for easy service. The access hole for the bolt was off diagonally and had no chance other than disassembling a lot more intricate machinery. I bought a 3 yr extended warranty on the new machine. Otherwise it is 90 days and after only parts to 25 years. You pay shipping to them, they pay to ship back. Extended warranty pays both ways parts an labor 3 years. I'll leave it to them to fix should problems arise.
 

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Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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No offence MT, but technical writing is worth learning or using as an app.. Technical is difficult. English Majors suffer.
My syntax is never perfect and I struggle with sentence structure. My rule is to separate thoughts by comma's at best.
Having drunk a bottle of wine, cognition is optional.
I meant to get in the shop today. The 1914 Harley brake anchor has to be made. Saturday here is supposed to be wet. Rainey day. Shop time.

Tom
 
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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
My shop is getting a work out now and I've backed off buying tools and got back to actually using them on projects, but I'm really back logged with work. No worries I'll get round to it. Lot of rain means yard work without end, not a complaint as living in a arid land moisture is appreciated at all times. Mowing every five days is unusual here during June and July however.

Rick C.
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
In the shop today to make a final assemble press for Shadow Conspiracy half link chain. It isn't common, but on occasion
the factory tool does not work as you wish. Today I machined a small block of 6061 to condense the chain plates to aid alignment, while the chain pin is pressed in. This is another of my deviations from a proper SF build.
Photos forthcoming..
Tom
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
Went to see Mona's Oncologist today down in Milwaukee by a route avoiding the Bucks celebration.
Mona had blood work done and a full body CT scan. The one thing preceding this visit that was not done was a bone marrow biopsy.
Which would definitively showed whether or not the rogue white blood cell's are still being produced. Her Oncologist still wants it done. And it has been scheduled But, without the marrow biopsy. Three times he said the R word.
I asked if that extended her warranty?
Tom
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
Inspired by the brake arm anchor of the 1914 model 10F HD, yesterday i did the layout work on a block of 6061.
Today, I set up the block in the Bridgeport vise, using an edge finder I established the center line. From the end of the block, finding the edge, moved in 5/8" set zero in X and Y of the digital read out. the 5/8" move was to generate a 1/4" web.
Center drilled and then drilled thru 1/2" dia., followed by a 3/4"dia. end mill through the block. The 3/4" bore matching the 3/4" dia. of the chain stay leg. I calculated in an excess amount of material.
You can take it off but you can't put it back on.
Unless you are a good welder. Another digression. Early in my apprenticeship I was turning a piece in a lathe. my measurement was off by ten thou. so I dialed in another ten and the [email protected] thing got smaller.
The brake arm hanger cannot be centered to what I am making unlike the 10F. The Flyer chain stay tube is pinched and swells to hold the axel hanger. This whole exercise was to eliminate the usual hanger strap.
Wonder why I drink?
1914 Harley-Davidson Model 10-F Twin - National Motorcycle Museum (nationalmcmuseum.org)
Tom
 

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