Ask a specific question

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by deacon, Jan 22, 2008.

  1. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    How do you feel about the friction drive. It would seem to me to be more reliable. Something about that chain, clutch, and sprocket just makes me think more to go wrong.

    My friction drive electric is always in contact but just not running like the gasoline would be. I bet if you counter weighted it you could move it up and down with a brake lever. Or maybe a shift lever would work better.
     
  2. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    What's nice about it-
    1.) Quiet and smooth.
    2.) Very easy to operate, even for a complete novice.
    3.) Nearly 200 mpg, although the liturature that came with it said "225 mpg"
    4.) Will pull, jerk free, uphill from 2-22 mph.
    5.) Very easy to pedal when the engine is off, friction/resistance free!

    Bad things-
    1.) Limited fuel capacity- about a quart.
    2.) No excess power, it will haul a 200 pound guy up a grade, just not very fast.
    3.) Top speed in the very low 20's. (may be idea for some, not me)

    Did I mention I have it listed in the Swap Shop?()
     
  3. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    so the avatar bike is friction drive.. nice ... of course friction drive will wear out a tire faster but so what. how about showing some closeup shots of the bike. i would love to see it.
     
  4. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    I'll get it out of cold storage and shoot some photos tomorrow, I have the day off.

    The roller is designed to wear faster than the tire....or so they say. You can replace the stock roller with a skateboard wheel, which is way cheaper than the replacement part.
     
  5. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    Here's a close up of the friction drive roller on the tire as it is when it's in the driving position.
    [​IMG]
     
  6. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    Here's the oily muffler extension and "after muffler".
    [​IMG]
     
  7. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    Finally, the whole works...The engine runs perpendicular to the front wheel, then the power is transmitted down the shaft and into the 90 degree gearbox which turns the roller. The roller can be replaced with a common skateboard wheel.
    [​IMG]
     
    #67 Bikeguy Joe, Feb 25, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2008
  8. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    Yesh....lots of road grime.
     
  9. Norman

    Norman LORD VADER Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    2,605
    Likes Received:
    1
    I like that.
    Rufus is even on my lap taking a look. I've got to do something about his rotten fish breath. He may need a tictak or what ever those things are called.
    Norman
     
  10. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    and the extra weight on the front isnt a problem in balancing the bike
     
  11. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    11,529
    Likes Received:
    4
    The only time I've noticed any balance problems are when it's on the kickstand.

    Standard proceedure when parking it is to put the front tire against a building, curb or parking stop and put it in gear then put it on the stand. Still, I don't like to walk too far away on a windy day.

    Riding it is a piece of cake of the plain vanilla variety.

    You put the Sturmey Archer three speed in 1st, pedal a half a pedal and throw the lever and off you go.

    On the road the best speed for the engine seems to be about the same as you'd pedal it in 3rd gear at a brisk pace.

    On larger hills, it's a matter of opinion as to whether the engine is helping you, or you are helping the engine.

    On the flat you can go uneventfully from a crawl to 22 mph just by advancing the lawn mower lever type throttle from idle to full, and excersizing some patience.

    SMMMOOOOTHHH.
     
    #71 Bikeguy Joe, Feb 25, 2008
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2008
  12. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    NEW QUESTION
    ADVICE NEEDED.. got a bent wheel. It's from a junk bike so I don't have anything in it, but how about tightening the spokes how does one do that to true the wheel. I have a spoke wrench but no idea how to even start. Or is it even worth the effort.
     
  13. paul

    paul Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    10
  14. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    Okay this is a serious question that might sound humorous.... I ran out of gas today. Fortunately I was only a few blocks from home. Still I thought I was gonna have a heart attack. That isn't the question,

    the question is if 12 oz of gasoline explodes, how much force does it have.

    Yes I sealed up 12 oz of gas in a plastic bottle and used a couple of bungee cords to tie it to the basket of my bike. So am I flirting with instant death or simple disfigurement.
     
  15. paul

    paul Active Member

    Joined:
    Dec 23, 2007
    Messages:
    5,536
    Likes Received:
    10
    i am not really sure deacon. i had planned on doing the same thing and kept thinking about things i have bungied on the bike before that fell off. i found out motorbike mike has 1 gallon gas tanks for our motorized bicycles and i ordered one from him and going to try to keep it full
     
  16. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    If i had a ten gallon tank I would run out of gas. I just forget to look. I have no idea how dangerous the 12 oz bottle is but I have a basket for mine to sit in. I just tied it so it wouldn't roll around.

    I wondering if all that sloshing around on the bike is going to cause it to pressurize the plastic bottle till it bursts. Gas on a hot engine might not be a good thing. I might just put the thing in a loose plastic bag as well.
     
  17. Norman

    Norman LORD VADER Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2008
    Messages:
    2,605
    Likes Received:
    1
    Gasoline will not burn, its the vapors that burn, leaking vapors can burn but you would have to burst the bottle and get all the liquid to vaporize to make it explode. I Don't think you have too much to worry about. Your tank has a vapor space in it but it don't explode cause its not got the right mixture fuel and air mix. with too rich mix and spark no fire takes what? 14 air to 1 fuel to go bang which is really a very fast burn. Don't go out there and try to prove me wrong, it won't hurt me but, might burn the carp out of yourself if you don't respect the stuff. Leave a space in the bottle for the heat of the day to allow for the expansion or a vented bottle and you should be ok. Be careful we don't want yout get hurt.
    I still haven't had the need to refuel on any of the bicycle rides only the motorcycle rides. You guys are tougher than me these bikes can beat the helo out of you. check the fuel before riding is best if you can't remember build a big sign to remind yourself after a few pedaling home trips I would learn, and no sign needed, my tongue would have scars form the spoke hitting them
     
    #77 Norman, Mar 3, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2008
  18. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have been thinking and rethinking my rear wheel. I have the size down okay but I'm wondering with all the problems I have with cruiser style brakes maybe I should think about hand brakes for the rear as well as the front. Problem is I cant for the life of me figure how I would work two brake levers and a clutch lever as well. Anybody have any ideas.
     
  19. Ilikeabikea

    Ilikeabikea Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2008
    Messages:
    2,323
    Likes Received:
    0
    Deacon I use my back brake most of the time. But if I need to stop quick I lock the clutch down and grab the front brake. It is down lower than the clutch handle. I can reach either one................
     
  20. deacon

    deacon minor bike philosopher

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2008
    Messages:
    8,119
    Likes Received:
    0
    That makes sense. I don't have a locking clutch but it sounds like a good idea if you are using double hand brakes.

    I wonder if you could rig a brake or clutch lever to operate with your knee. lol
     
    #80 deacon, Mar 3, 2008
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2008

Share This Page