After a crash, replacement parts needed. PICS

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by darrick, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. darrick

    darrick New Member

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    on New Year's Eve I had a pretty epic spill on the bike..
    the story:
    Just filled up with a new mix and decided to drive it off a couple blocks to try it out; hit a pot hole (Tx sized) which contributed to knocking my chain off the sprocket and into my spokes (crappy tensioner: as usual) but this was right before trying to make a turn.
    Long story short I hit the curb, did some kind of flip, and I landed in some small evergreens on someone's front walkway. First thing I heard afer was the kids watching saying "Dat was aweshum!"
    I ♥ My Helmet


    the parts:
    Just replaced my bent front wheel, and bent-back my handlebars.
    But I need a New 26" rear wheel, the whitewall one is bent and wobbly. Suggest any good models from the sidebar sites for cheep?
    [​IMG]
    [notice the switched out front wheel&tire -matching doesn't matter so much to me.]

    also since I'm switching out the rear might aswell use a newer sprocket mount/adapter from the flimsy worn China kit one I had when I bought the bike non-running.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [note the bent/missing spokes]


    ANY specific model sprocket mount suggestions?? links?






    and any suggestions about my tensioner? (YES I did bend it to align with the sprocket.)
    When being ridden the top of the chain rubs and drags against the bottom of the chain, making a constant ticking sound. And the main concern is when the tensioner mount slides inward and causes the chain to fall and eat my spokes. (what lead to the wreck) Its worse when tightened all the way up.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]


    Any help in finding deals is appreciated. Thanks!
    -Darrick
     
    #1 darrick, Jan 3, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2010
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Move the tensioner bracket toward the rear, secure it to the chain stay with a small bolt through the bracket and frame, then, shorten the chain. And get rid of that rubber between the tensioner bracket and frame.
    The best way is to fabricate a new tensioner bracket and weld it to the bike or, as some guys get away with, run without a tensioner. You have some adjustement in the rear drop outs so maybe you can do it. I'm an advocate of the tensioner but it must be installed securely and aligned properly. Chain length and tension is also important.
    Tom
     
  3. darrick

    darrick New Member

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    I'll definitely move the bracket down the rear, but do Not want to drill the load-bearing part of my old frame.

    any avocation of a good deal on rear wheals and sprocket adapters?
    Thanks
     
  4. hambro

    hambro New Member

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    looks like you could get rid of at least two, maybe three links in that chain. You'd end up gettin all of your adjustment back out of that tensioner which would move the pulley down lower on the bracket where it is a little less flimsy, course you'll have to slide the whole tensioner forward some then, but thats cake.
     
  5. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

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    There's always the old bike shop for the installation of a new alloy replacement rim, or just purchase one of those. Shouldn't cost too much.

    With the wheel out, you can simply move loosened spokes from the old rim to the new. By tightening them equally a turn or half turn until tight, the wheel is usually just pretty much round and true, but maybe you can get a wheel jig, or find somebody with a rear caliper brake and use that for the fine truing.

    Yes, the chain needs to be shortened- if you have allignment between the sprockets, you may even loose the tensioner- if the chain isn't rubbing the frame chain stay then. Sometimes washers can be used to make small increments in the wheel axle side to side.
     
    #5 Nashville Kat, Jan 3, 2010
    Last edited: Jan 3, 2010
  6. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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  7. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    heck, you could buy a whole motorized cranbrook for 250... and if you find the right ad, it gets 150 miles to the gallon, goes forty, has an 80cc, and is street legal...
     
  8. darrick

    darrick New Member

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    The nearest bike shop is 50 miles away so any immediate external help is out of the question. Same goes for the craigslist postings' locations.. just my luck

    I bought the bike halfway assembled off craigslist for $140, not including replacement parts..
    but where are you seeing yours for that much??

    No idea what make or model it is, all I know it its pretty old.

    anyone ever tried these wheels?
    Alloy Rear Wheel W/ Coaster Brake 26 Inch
    or this sprocket adapter?
    Hub Adapter with Sprocket

    As mentioned I'd like a newer hub for the sprocket aside from the cheep worn rubber-mounted one as pictured.
     
  9. hambro

    hambro New Member

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    I used those wheels as replacements on the first I built while I was in Iraq last year. Got em from a guy who'd built about 7 or 8 bikes for soldiers there. The wheels held up to that rough terrain just fine and I rode the heck out of that bike in 137 degree heat most days. Besides, for the price they are hard to pass up.
     
  10. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    the wheels i listed have 12 guage spokes. they're way thicker and stronger than 14, like the pirate wheel. i guess it all depends on what you're gonna do with the bike.

    and the sprocket adapter is the best thing ever for these bikes. that's all i use.
     
  11. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    Is it just me or is the sprocket installed backwards? Putting it further away from the spokes.
     
  12. Elmo

    Elmo New Member

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    Glad you survived the crash, sorry about the bike. Go yo the local dump and ask about bicycles, sometimes you can find a pretty good bike there. I have gotten about 10 or 15 over the years. One was a trek 700 cross bike complete.
    Elmo
     
  13. Toecutter66

    Toecutter66 New Member

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    I have the Pirate Cycle rear wheel and that same sprocket/sprocket adapter. Very sweet set-up, but I am still building my bike, so I dont know how well it works, but looks like it will be fine.
     
  14. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    I dont understand why there is not a strip of steel or alum. with a hole drilled at the idler location and zip tied or something accross the chain and seat stays ,just added as an extra brace to stop the spoke desaster with the slipping braket.
    I saw many fixes on here,but not a simple safty strap.
     
  15. Evan

    Evan New Member

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    roger that. sounds like you took a pretty good fall. glad ur ok
     
  16. DILSI

    DILSI New Member

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    just figured I'd stop in and say you're not alone... I had my first incident with a pothole today (actually, with two, one right after the other) on my Cranbrook... bent the heck out of my front wheel, but I managed to stay on and tried to limp it home... Then the front tire blew out on the exit ramp going to base at about 25mph. SCARY, but I managed to grab a hand full of rear brake and put my Flintstone brakes to good use, and managed to stop. The front wheel of my old Mongoose now resides on the front... the front shocks might go on soon. I just remember that the only thing that went through my head when the tube blew was "Oh %#^$, I'm wearing a wifebeater. Don't hit the guardrail, don't hit the guardrail, don't hit the guardrail..."
     
  17. Goat Herder

    Goat Herder Gutter Rider

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    Digging the idea of a safety strap lol. Go a bit further put a teinsoner bracket that ties into the upper and lower trailing arms. Would take a bit of fabrication to make one . Some where on this forum is a link to a pict of a nice set up that way , but darn if I can find it right now.
     
  18. chainmaker

    chainmaker New Member

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  19. donutguy

    donutguy New Member

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    Glad you're okay but one thing in your post that got my immediate attention......you mentioned your handlebars were bent. How bent were they?

    I speak from experience.....depending how much you had to bend them back- they are way more prone to failing during your next impact.

    I'd replace them- cheap insurance for your front teeth:)
     

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