49cc's on a Schwinn

Discussion in 'Motorized Cruiser Bicycles' started by FOG, Mar 3, 2019.

  1. FOG

    FOG Well-Known Member

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    I got that lathe for free but all that means is I started spending from zero. There's a distinct possibility I've spent more on it than it's worth. But I ain't gonna sell it ... so who cares? What I'm really proud of is all my machines have essentially paid for themselves. Before I got sick to death of making them I sold over 400 KTM 50 clutch pullers on E-Bay. Brass piston stops. Early 80's Husqvarna chain guides did well too. In the end tho that turned out be an excellent way to ruin a perfectly good hobby. I want those machines for me!

    Here's what it looked like when we 1st met:

    Picture 157.jpg

    Now there's a face only a mother could love. And ya know, it takes special nuts like us to see the potential in what most people would regard as a piece of junk. Eventually I got it looking like this:

    Picture 145.jpg

    But it don't look like that now! All that bright metal is stained dark from lubricants and the paint's scratched in the places where a lathe needs to be scratched. All of which is fine with me.

    Kind of a cool backstory in that the Grandson of the company founder still supports the lathes as best he can, and that includes the sales records. My lathe, S/N 60214, was 1st sold to Southwest Tool Supply on April 21st, 1952, which was a scant 7 weeks after I was born. I am older than my lathe. But not by much.

    And just like my lathe we're both a bit worn out and wobbly! This wasn't no hobby machine. It was a worker bee just like me. Depending on what part of the bed you're on it won't hold a thou for more than 1/2". But it's still incredibly useful. I dunno how I ever lived without it.
     
  2. Tony01

    Tony01 Well-Known Member

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    That thing is strong enough for plenty of stuff. Something like that with a koolmist on the end is homeshop heaven!
     
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  3. Tom from Rubicon

    Tom from Rubicon Well-Known Member

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    #23 Tom from Rubicon, May 18, 2019
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
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  4. FOG

    FOG Well-Known Member

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    You got a point there Tom. The many happy hours are priceless. We're like old men whittlin' away on a front porch. We just do it in metal.

    I'm guessing yours is late 60' or early 70's? 11" swing? 14" maybe? Motor in the cabinet with the knobs being for spindle speed? The QC Box and apron are very familiar but that cross slide and compound look to be way more substantial than mine.

    BTW, Scott Logan is the Grandson and it's the Logan Actuator Co. now. Good old machines.
     
  5. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    I really enjoy seeing shop equipment setup for home use. My old Logan was a 1950's era table top, quite similar in size to Tom's it was capable, barely, of holding .001" working 15" of the bed, head side. Accurate for enough for a lot of the work I was doing at the time. I wish I hadn't let it go when I sold my shop out, but thought my days of fabricating parts was history...should have ignored the Dr.'s prognosis; he's dead & I can still see well enough to spot a good used setup, locally, if it presents itself a value!

    Rick C.
     
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  6. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    Access to good shop equipment is something I miss from my old job, when you have a complete machine shop to use as you please then you lose that ability its tough. Its been over 4 years since I've used a lathe or mill but I bet its kinda like riding a bicycle!
     
  7. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    I never had a lathe, but used one in high school shop class. Wanted one ever since, finally got a chance to buy one, years after a friend passed on. She was saving it for her son, but he had no interest. Was in my late 60's , was a dirty mess after setting uncovered for 15 years or so. ( they painted cars in that garage and all the over spray, ug. ) Best part is that i can now make some stuff that would never get built if i had to pay to have it done. Just so handy to go to the lathe and just turn a piece needed or retrofit one. The only thing more would be a end mill but at 77 to old to invest, unless it was dirt cheep...........Curt
     
    #27 curtisfox, May 19, 2019
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
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  8. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Wow!! I love the stories about everyone's lathes! :)

    I bought mine from a friend when his father passed.... It's a Montgomery Ward (probably from the 1940's).... It's built like a friggin' tank!
    He also sold me a mini mill from the 40's... I think it's from Los Angeles Machine co?

    I'll try to get some pics & post them.
     
  9. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    LOL. KOOL Forgot mine is a Atlas type...............Curt
     
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  10. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    Here's pics of them the day I brought them home.... They needed a lot of cleaning up, but they both still work great! :)
    He also gave me several large boxes of spare parts, attachments, & weird tools for making special parts... (I still don't even know what most of them can do)?


    IMG_9618.JPG IMG_9619.JPG
     
  11. Tom from Rubicon

    Tom from Rubicon Well-Known Member

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    Hey Norm,
    Nice old Atlas lathe and that mini mill.
    What you say guys we take this to the tavern?
    I'm guilty hijacking and I know it.
    I will happily delete from this thread anything not pertinent to let FOG do his builds with us contributing as best we can.
    Tom from Rubicon
     
    #31 Tom from Rubicon, May 19, 2019
    Last edited: May 20, 2019
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  12. Tony01

    Tony01 Well-Known Member

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    That’s where I’m at as well. I’d rock a lil 10hp cnc if I had a place to put it.

    Easier to farm it out tho. Stuff like hubs can be sold easily so I’d farm out 10 of them to cover mine plus some profit. I got my clamping torque arm dropouts done this way.
     
    #32 Tony01, May 19, 2019
    Last edited: May 19, 2019
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  13. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Norm the shop equipment topic has been moved to the tavern.

    Rick C.
     
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  14. FOG

    FOG Well-Known Member

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    Now that I've made a hub to mount a brake rotor it's time to mount up a caliper, and since I've never done this before it's no surprise that things aren't working out as expected. And isn't that the way it always works?

    Best guess is these Chinese calipers are designed for a modern tubular fork with a straight leg and a leading axle. NOT the sexy curves you find in the legs of an old Schwinn. Of course the other option is they're not designed to fit anything at all and it's up to me to make them fit! Could be.

    Here's my first cut and you can see in the pic how the caliper lines up with the straight upper part of the leg.

    DSCF0766.JPG

    That monster is a direct mount to the caliper which means it will have to be a 3/8" thick piece of steel to have enough meat for M6 threaded holes. The threaded holes will also need a quick hit with a ball mill to form a socket. In addition to some side to side adjustment the calipers have rounded washers for some rotational adjustment. That's cool. Oughta be able to fine tune that.

    The calipers also come with an additional bracket that is probably a smarter way to do it. Oops! That leaves me out.

    DSCF0768.JPG

    1/4" plate would work there and that's a whole lot easier to carve than 3/8"! That'd be helpful. But just eyeballing it looks like, since the mount will have to sit on top of the extra bracket the 1/4" is gonna be out there in space above and outside of the leg. Which wouldn't be a problem if it was going on a modern fork with a 1" tube leg. I think the Chinese got me again!

    Gonna have to mock it up and see. I'll think of something ....
     
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  15. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    I wondered about how you'd handle the caliper mount after you machined your hub & it looks as though your approaching a solution. You're quite limited in room for spacing a mount. It's a problem which I'm familiar with.

    I've had some good times this spring mounting both rotors and calipers with little room with which to work. I used various off the shelf parts & added modifications, and I'm absolutely positive I'd have saved time and money by just fabricating three different custom caliper mounts instead. So I too think the Chinese and Japanese got me!

    Rick C.
     
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  16. FOG

    FOG Well-Known Member

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    I decided to mount directly to the caliper with a fat piece of steel. At least it's behind and inline with the leg vs something hanging on the side. But it's entirely too big! Gonna need some more creative carving.

    DSCF0770.JPG
     
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  17. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    If you can lock the brake handle down the bracket should stay lined up, I am interested in trying a front disc on a non disc fork. If you will post what you’ve found that does or doesn’t work.
     
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  18. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Amanda's bike.jpg

    My daughter's bike, simple brake adapter setup with this and most forks.

    Simplex rear resize.jpg
    Rear brake assembly using a standard adapter.

    I run a front disc on all my bike builds, except for one that has a drum (Sturmey Archer) & no two forks alike on any of my cycles, 'kinda my thing.. A couple of the forks have factory brake mounting posts, but I use off the shelf disc brake adapters for the rest. On a couple of these I had to get a little creative, but the rest just bolted up & worked & I'm not offended by the way they look either. $15. solution for 100 percent better braking! They come in various anodized finishes though I typically get aluminum or black. A not so quick mental calculation & I come up with seven different fork styles that I've used these adapters on.

    I've also used these adapters for the rear brakes on two of these bikes as well, but that entailed a lot of fabrication & fitting to install those two.

    Rick C.
     
    #38 indian22, May 31, 2019
    Last edited: May 31, 2019
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  19. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    I’ve got by with a front side pull add on on beach cruisers, along with a upgraded coaster brake. I have found the sets along with hub on eBay, I’ve got a couple of spare wheels so I may give one a try. The last time I laced a wheel I was young and couldn’t get it true.
     
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  20. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Always good to learn a new skill Greg. If it doesn't work to suit, the front disc is tried and true best stopping solution for any cycle. You could lace up a disc hub just as easy. All in all have fun with it.

    Rick C.
     
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