These guys aren't lying...

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by frogbiscuit, Aug 12, 2012.

  1. frogbiscuit

    frogbiscuit New Member

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    Everything that they said would happen to my 66cc HT did, and I was forewarned. Thanks for this forum, and you guys with all your info. It has been invaluable.
     
  2. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

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    We advise, you learn. We been there (c)
     
  3. CroMagnum

    CroMagnum Member

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    I cringe every time I see someone post something like "I know nothing about engines" or "I need to have someone build it for me" because you know they're going to have nothing but trouble, and every little problem is going to morph into a Hurricane Katrina-sized catastrophe.

    He may be new to MBs, but obviously frogbiscuit can turn a wrench and read instructions. So even though he was working with the usual marginal hardware, he was successful in getting it running.

    This is something I see sadly lacking here - a warning to newbies that unless you can fix your own bicycle and at least do some of the maintenance on your car, then motorized bicycles aren't for you. Without some mechanical abilities you're going to be stuck with a pile of junk and nothing to do but post that BGF/Luckyearlybird/BikeBerry/etc. are nothing but crooks. No, they're not crooks, they're just selling the same cheap crap that everyone sells.

    Basically, if you can't fix your own lawn mower, don't try to build a motorized bike.
     
  4. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Cro, I tend to agree on several levels, nevertheless, this forum was created and established in an effort to help those who need help. Yes, I agree that there is a percentage out there who would be well advised to take up stamp collecting as a hobby and leave the mechanical things to someone else. However, there are also those who, with our help, advice and guidance might just get a bike going and learn a lot along the way.
    A mechanical aptitude will go a long way towards building a successful motorized bicycle but if a person, even if he's never picked up a wrench in his life, but has the want and desire to have one, should be offered the guidence available here to see his goal through.

    I read posts here daily and some of them make me want to reply with, "don't even think about it" but then I read other posts from members who sounded totally inept in their earlier posts but who are now onto their second and third bikes, all because someone here took the time and effort to offer instruction that allowed the guy to accomplish successfully what he set out to do. And isn't that why we're here?

    Tom
     
  5. dodge dude94

    dodge dude94 New Member

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    ^Amen, brother.

    Having mechanical aptitude helps, boy, does it! But also having someone who is willing to teach someone who is totally ignorant helps too.
     
  6. NunyaBidness

    NunyaBidness Active Member

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    Everyone had to learn sometime. How ever many years of experience we may have, we did not have those years worth when we first started. Someone had the courtesy to teach us and help us learn what we know. Granted we, hopefully, along the way learned how to teach ourselves some things. But we didn't know how to do that even at first. So as long as someone is trying to learn I will do my best to help them learn.
     
  7. Bronze

    Bronze New Member

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    Ive been riding my bike now for a week. I knew nothing of engines really, I am certified up the wazoo with computers and networking etc, but that is a whole different ball game obviously. I learned tons. It was fun to learn and apply what little I knew to this. I watched a ton of instructional videos and basic animations of 2 stroke engines and made a effort to understand what every screw, nut, gear, and bolt was for.

    I still think my engine will blow up in my crotch, but... so far so good... *fingers crossd*

    I have gone maybe 100 clicks so far, engine almost broken in. Replaced some of the cheap crap it came with like chain tensioner idle wheel that fell off first 20 km I went. ( replaced with a idler from a bearings shop that I belive are for lawnmowers, but its all metal, not palstic).
    My idler screw came out someplac, replaced it with a similar screw from hardware store and a spring from a pen ( works wonderfully). This place was a haven for learning and information. Was fun learning, and frustrating at times... but worth it!!!

    Now I am at th point I have to buy this grease, and that spray, and tese bolts, and those gaskets, and this that blah blah blah lol....
     
    #7 Bronze, Aug 14, 2012
    Last edited: Aug 14, 2012
  8. Allen_Wrench

    Allen_Wrench Resident Mad Scientist

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    When I first lurked on this sight a few short years ago, I immediately saw its value too. Because of these gentlemen and ladies here ahead of me, I have reason to believe I've spared myself considerable amounts of trouble.

    After reading about what a hassle the rag joint was, I never even used it on my first build. I've had a hub adapter from the beginning. I also learned just how important it is to have your chain "tensioner" (if you need one) mounted very, VERY securely. I learned where to find good front engine mount adapters for oversize down tubes. I learned the best way to tune an NT Speed carburettor.
    And since then, with my second build, I've brazed together a custom tank, fabricated custom light fixtures, done port matching, installed copper fuel line and a cool old-school fuel filter, and on and on.
    And where did I learn to do all this - right here. Sure, I could have maybe figured it out on my own, with lots of research. But it's so much easier having the exact information you're looking for all gathered into one place. And it's been tested in the field, by these members. Great advice, great bunch of people, great forum!
     
  9. killercanuck

    killercanuck New Member

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    Hear hear! We've all had to learn from scratch, but this forum helps that itch, big time! When I look back at my first posts I was a total newbie, yet I still learn something new everyday.
     
  10. thxcuz

    thxcuz Member

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    Those who consider themselves experts should write a how to guide including a basic tutorial in the principals of engine repair their experiences with HT engines. Make it an ebook and sell it on line. The author makes a few bucks and newbies like me will stop asking dumb questions.
    I'm a friction guy myself but if I had the skill I would go for a china girl. Some sort of book would be super helpful.
     

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