Probably a crazy idea : Micargi Puma GTS with Lifan 250 v-twin

xXNightRiderXx

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Jan 12, 2017
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Hey guys, I know I ain't been active in a while. Been busy on a bunch of other crap. Anyways, I was browsing around amazon a while back, and found the Lifan engine mentioned in the title, and more recently, found the puma for less than $300. Now, I'm mentioning these two items together because I figured that frame would not only fit, but also reliably handle this engine, and this two cylinder monster can also be a self contained power source for lights, having an integrated 12v charging system built into the stator. It has a built in 5 speed tranny, and that, combined with a 38t direct drive sprocket, should make for a pretty badass ride. Everything the bike would need, minus running lights, drive gear, and the engine mount, is there, and ready to use. Has anyone already done this one, or is it still waiting to be tested?
 

MotorBicycleRacing

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SoCal Baby!!!
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Waiting for you to make this happen.

LIFAN 250cc V-Twin Manual Clutch 5 Speed with Electric Start Lifan 250cc v-twin engine w/ 5 speed transmission electronics . This engine puts out about 18 HP. Engine Model: 2V49FMM These engines are complete with 5 speed transmission, electronic. Stop putting a lawnmower engine on that Mini Chopper give your Mini Chopper the authentic look it deserves with a real motorcycle engine. 250cc V-Twin Engine Specs: Type 4 Stroke Twin cylinders, V-Twin, four stroke, air-cooled Displacement (c.c.) 248cc Bore x Stroke (mm) 49.0 x 66.0 Max HP 16.25 HP @ 8,000 rpm Max Torque 13 ftlbs @ 6,000 rpm Compression 10.0:1 Ignition system: CDI (Capacitive Discharge Ignition) Idle 1,300 rpm Starter Kick and Electric Clutch Manual Wet Multiple Plate Transmission Left foot gear-change, five-gear constant meshing Lubrication Pressure splash inner-outer scavenger rotor Voltage 12 Volt
Length 20.25"
Width 14.25"
Height 17.75"
Weight 95 lbs.
 

xXNightRiderXx

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Jan 12, 2017
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I've decided against the Puma, and instead im buying a stretch frame so I can pick and choose my components, and I could send the frame in to fit it with a linkage suspension, that way i can slap a nice big air shock on the rear. Mtb components are probably gonna be the best way to go here. When I have the frame modified, I will likely make the dropouts wider and the stays a bit longer so I can put a 26x4.0 tire on it. I will be using spoked wheels, and im goin 10ga with the spokes. All said, I think this bike is gonna run be around $5000 to build, and about another 500 for insurance, titling, and registration.

As for the suspension design for the rear, I'm gonna keep it simple and stick with a linkage driven single pivot. And, for the night ranger, it will be a floating shock system. You can get all sorts of inspiration for rear suspension from the mtb industry, so take a look. Im also going to be using a fox float shock on the rear, cause why spare the expense, and fox is known for making some really plush shocks.

The fork will be a rockshox triple tree, with 203mm of travel. Air sprung as well, so this ride will be smooth and plush. In the meantime, I am still working on getting my 8 speed shifter up to sale quality. Redoing the electronics, including adding a 5 3/4" headlight and a loom, just repainted the frame, and now I'm polishing the engine case. The case will be painted with a chrome paint, with a red anodized finish coat, for that candy look. I also made the largest chainring larger, so I should have more torque available to me now.

Oh, I almost forgot! I will be painting the stretch bike a candy blue, with candy orange accents. Also, I'll be adding forward motorcycle controls behind the bottom bracket, and I will have reserve cranks and pedals stored in the saddle bags.
 

xXNightRiderXx

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Jan 12, 2017
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You guys think this frame would work? Just strip off the chrome, weld on what needs to be welded, including mounts for 203mm downhill disc brakes with hydraulic calipers, and then repaint with a chrome paint with a blue clear. I will probably reinforce the stays more than anything, but with some stylish cross bracing connecting it to the seat tube to avoid warping the stays.

I chose that frame because I think it would fit perfectly with the aforementioned motor:

and then there's these wheels, which i will be placing an adapter onto:

and here's the adapter:


Now just comes the part of actually acquiring these parts....starting with the motor, and going down in price from there. I think what I'm going to do with the brake pedal on the forward controls is use it to actuate the clutch. I won't be able to do hydraulic mtb brakes on this bike without doing that. But, as far as mounting the engine....necro, would you be able to help me out with that? I saw the way you mounted that 125cc lifan to your puma, and I found it interesting and ingenious.
 
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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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I too like the crazy ideas. V 250 Yamahas have indeed been used on bicycle style frames, the Lifan 250 V is a knockoff of the Virago motor, I have a Lifan as well as an original Yamaha motor that I acquired and plan for use on a board track style bike. I also plan on using a bicycle frame but one that is highly modified. I started a thread (page 3 of board track forum) Old guys V twin and sidecar, but got tied up in other projects. Hope to get back to work on it next summer.

A good build thread that uses an older version of the 250 V Yamaha with unitized transmission, is the Excelsior V twin (100 mph bike) thread on page 4 of the board track forum, started by Dare devil...it's pretty detailed & has good info. On page three of the same forum, there's a Briggs V twin with CVT build by Veskt that is really detailed & contains excellent information as well.

I've no idea of your skill level, but even if you are highly advanced these two threads are worth your time. I think your budget sufficient for the task you've set. P.M. me if you have questions. Though I build vintage style the basics are much the same. Neither of these two bikes ended up using stock bicycle frames or wheels and for very good reasons. Dot rated tires wheels and brakes allow you to put it on the highways legally. The neck and fork geometry of a bicycle typically won't track at high speed& this could prove fatal. Frame strength and dimensions are only two of the factors involved & lots of problems to be solved...prior to investing in all the parts.

Just to be clear neither of my motors are for sale just mentioned so you know I'm invested in finishing a 250 twin one day.

Best of luck on this very intriguing project.

Rick C.
 
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xXNightRiderXx

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Jan 12, 2017
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I'm amazed by the enthusiasm on this! I thought for sure there would be naysayers, but yall just proved me wrong! I think I'll get to work on gathering the parts and tools. Anyone know where I can make a fast and easy $2000?
 

domN8er

New Member
Aug 16, 2016
22
5
3
california
Hey guys, I know I ain't been active in a while. Been busy on a bunch of other crap. Anyways, I was browsing around amazon a while back, and found the Lifan engine mentioned in the title, and more recently, found the puma for less than $300. Now, I'm mentioning these two items together because I figured that frame would not only fit, but also reliably handle this engine, and this two cylinder monster can also be a self contained power source for lights, having an integrated 12v charging system built into the stator. It has a built in 5 speed tranny, and that, combined with a 38t direct drive sprocket, should make for a pretty badass ride. Everything the bike would need, minus running lights, drive gear, and the engine mount, is there, and ready to use. Has anyone already done this one, or is it still waiting to be tested?
have you made funeral arrangements
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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If this thread ever does get further than the dreaming stage, my opinion would be to definitely reconsider your choice of frame. The type of stretch cruiser frame you envisage using has the lower frame tube running almost horizontal into the chain stays - which are also horizontal. This is going to give you a high centre of gravity with that heavy V-twin aboard - as well as less space to accommodate the motor. Far better to opt for one of the stretch cruiser frames that have a much lower frame tube and steeply angled chain stays, locating the motor where it needs to be - LOW DOWN. Check out the geometry on frames from the likes of Ruff (who offer compatible bespoke gas tanks for their frames), Basman, TSP and others. I've daydreamed about this same motor mated to a couple of the TSP frames. Their Oldster frame in particular is a nice starting point prior to wielding the cutting gear and adding the gussets and bracketry needed for such a build.
 
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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Yes Pete the ones I have are about 80 lbs. & that weight should be centered well below axle height. The bike I'm shown with (look left) is 66 lbs. & it's mass is below axle.

Rick C.
 

xXNightRiderXx

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While I do appreciate the time you guys took to comment on this, I have certain aspects I'm designing for. I'd prefer to have the motor slightly higher because it helps with ground clearance (lowered cars here do not survive the curbs and most dipped intersections without significant scratches), agility, and it also opens my options up for replacement frames if I ever need to do that. My current bike weighs in the neighborhood of 85lbs, not including the battery. ALL of that mass is above the axles, and I enjoy how responsive the steering is. I also intend to use it on the gravel backroads that are in abundance here in Idaho to get my mountain bike where I want to ride. Considering the terrible condition of the roads here too, I'd rather have my horizontals as high up as i can, just in case I'm riding at night and don't see the debris ahead of me. I don't want to risk bottoming my frame on something like a branch or a tire/retread and causing even more fatigue, which will cause far more serious issues than just a high CoM. I like to balance my performance. I like agility with stability, power with fuel efficiency, and reliability with speed (i don't tie power with top speed, because top speed relies on so many things, and usually, reliability means weight, and weight means lower speeds).


have you made funeral arrangements
You do realize that you risk death every time you get out of bed, and even every time you eat? If we made funeral arrangements every time we did something risky, we'd never get anything done, and we'd be spending trillions more than we could ever make in our lifetimes. If all the innovators who made the things we use every day worried about dying every time they made a change, there would never have been cars, or planes, or helicopters, or any of the wonderful things we have today. Death is a guarantee. Mitigation of risk is a choice, and only those who risk everything, gain everything. To quote one of my favorite songs: "We are going to die, and that makes US the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born." So make the most of this life. That's why we are here: to live in the stead of those who never will. That is why I do this: so that the person who might have been here in my stead can live through my actions, through my builds, through my ideas.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Fair comment. It's your dream bike; your money; so build it your way.
If those factors were governed by me, I wouldn't be looking to cover so many bases. Most builds involve a degree of trade off. So I'd question any decision to use what are quintessentially cruiser elements in your design - stretched frame, V-twin engine - and expect to go off-roading with it. Design screams tarmac queen. Horses for courses.
Been exactly two years since your initial posting. Any ideas turned into metal yet? More than a few folks would like to see this happen.
 
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xXNightRiderXx

Active Member
Jan 12, 2017
416
63
28
Boise
Fair comment. It's your dream bike; your money; so build it your way.
If those factors were governed by me, I wouldn't be looking to cover so many bases. Most builds involve a degree of trade off. So I'd question any decision to use what are quintessentially cruiser elements in your design - stretched frame, V-twin engine - and expect to go off-roading with it. Design screams tarmac queen. Horses for courses.
Been exactly two years since your initial posting. Any ideas turned into metal yet? More than a few folks would like to see this happen.
All my funds are taken by my current build and my mtb, and I need to be careful with how I save my money. Im on ssid, so if my balance goes above 2k, i no longer have the measly income i currently do.

Yes, this bike is primarily intended for tarmac. But the frame will be modified to accomodate rear suspension because of all the dirt roads around here. I want the stretched frame because i intend to use it for cross nation trips, and that type of frame is well suited for that. That frame will also be able to hold a 5 gal tank and look good doing it. The 250 would have more than enough power for this bike, so I know I'd have the speed. Like I said too, I'm going with 26x4 tires, so even without suspension, the ride on the dirt roads will be smoother, and I'll get very little road vibration on the highways.
 

domN8er

New Member
Aug 16, 2016
22
5
3
california
While I do appreciate the time you guys took to comment on this, I have certain aspects I'm designing for. I'd prefer to have the motor slightly higher because it helps with ground clearance (lowered cars here do not survive the curbs and most dipped intersections without significant scratches), agility, and it also opens my options up for replacement frames if I ever need to do that. My current bike weighs in the neighborhood of 85lbs, not including the battery. ALL of that mass is above the axles, and I enjoy how responsive the steering is. I also intend to use it on the gravel backroads that are in abundance here in Idaho to get my mountain bike where I want to ride. Considering the terrible condition of the roads here too, I'd rather have my horizontals as high up as i can, just in case I'm riding at night and don't see the debris ahead of me. I don't want to risk bottoming my frame on something like a branch or a tire/retread and causing even more fatigue, which will cause far more serious issues than just a high CoM. I like to balance my performance. I like agility with stability, power with fuel efficiency, and reliability with speed (i don't tie power with top speed, because top speed relies on so many things, and usually, reliability means weight, and weight means lower speeds).




You do realize that you risk death every time you get out of bed, and even every time you eat? If we made funeral arrangements every time we did something risky, we'd never get anything done, and we'd be spending trillions more than we could ever make in our lifetimes. If all the innovators who made the things we use every day worried about dying every time they made a change, there would never have been cars, or planes, or helicopters, or any of the wonderful things we have today. Death is a guarantee. Mitigation of risk is a choice, and only those who risk everything, gain everything. To quote one of my favorite songs: "We are going to die, and that makes US the lucky ones. Most people are never going to die because they are never going to be born." So make the most of this life. That's why we are here: to live in the stead of those who never will. That is why I do this: so that the person who might have been here in my stead can live through my actions, through my builds, through my ideas.
im not here to suppress people do your thing it was just a joke