Outlaws in NJ

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
TOPIC - MOTORIZED VEHICLES
Question: Is it illegal to use a moped in East Greenwich Township?
Answer: NJ Moped laws state you be at least 15 years old to get a moped permit.
After you pass a written test. you can drive during daylight hours only.
After you pass a road test you get a permanent moped license. Any one that has
an automobile license can drive a moped with no special license. You must wear a helmet,
have a registration, insurance and license plate. Insurance is $78.00 a year at this time.
Pedals required, 25mph maximum speed and 1.5 brake horsepower.
This law was effective in June of 1983.


My question is what constitutes 1.5 brake horsepower,

I don't see any cc specs in this one ?

^5 Hey ! I'm Mad AS **** And I'm Not Going To Take Any More !!
 

Dave31

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
Moped definition
A motorized bicycle, or moped, is defined by law as a pedal bicycle with a helper motor that has a maximum piston displacementof less than 50 cubic centimeters, or no more than 1.5 brake horsepower,and is capable of a maximum speed of no more than 25 miles per hour on a flat surface. A ticket can be issued to moped operators if they are traveling faster than 25 mph in a 30 mph speed zone.Motorized tricycles are not legal in New Jersey and cannot beoperated on public roadways.

Although they resemble bicycles, MOPEDs are heavier and handle differently. They usually require longer braking distances to stop, don't turn as quickly and are harder to pedal than bicycles.

Moped License requirements
Operators must carry a valid driver license, registration certificate and insurance identification card while driving a MOPED. Failure to do so can result in a fine up to $50.

How to Obtain a Moped License
be at least 15 years old
Visit an MVC Agency to complete an application for a moped permit.
Pass the 6 Point ID Verification
Pay $5 examination permit fee
Pass the knowledge and vision tests to validate your permit. Study by reading the Driver Manual and Motorcycle Manual
You must practice with a permit for at least 20 days before being eligible to take the road test
If you pass the road test, take your permit, ride slip and score sheet to an MVC Agency to receive your license and pay the $6 license fee
Moped registration
Owners must Title and register their vehicles before they can be driven on public roadways. Only MOPEDs approved by Motor Vehicle Services can be titled and registered. The titling fee is $20. The registration fee is $8 a year. MOPEDs must have a special MOPED license plate displayed on the rear of the vehicle. You can title and register the MOPED at any motor vehicle agency.

Moped insurance

Obtain liability insurance covering bodily injury up to $15,000, death up to $30,000, and property damage up to $5,000. Other moped laws

All operators and riders must wear a helmet. Safety helmets must meet the specifications established by the U.S. Department of Transportation. A full face shield is not required, but is recommended to prevent injury. Failure to do so will result in a serious injury and/or a fine of up to $100.
Eye protection, such as goggles, is recommended, but not required to operate a moped.
Mopeds must drive on the road as far to the right as possible, with an exception for turning left.
Operators cannot drive mopeds more than two abreast when traffic is not impeded. If traffic is impeded, mopeds must be operated in a single file line. Drivers should then communicate with other moped drivers with hand or voice signals.
Operators are not allowed to carry passengers.
Mopeds cannot attach themselves to other vehicles to "hitch a ride."
Mopeds cannot be operated on sidewalks, the interstate highway system, four-lane highways divided by a median, railroads, and highways with a speed limit over 50 mph.
Mopeds are required to have a bell or horn that can be heard from at least 100 feet away
A front white headlamp and red rear taillight that can be seen from 500 feet are required on all mopeds. These lights can be used all day, but must be used between sunset and sunrise, and in bad weather conditions.
Mopeds must have enough braking power to make the vehicle skid a dry, level, and clean piece of pavement.
The recommended clothing that moped operators should wear for safety reasons includes:
Bright clothes for easy visibility
An approved motorcycle helmet
Goggles, faceshield, and glasses
Pants made of heavy material
Heavy jacket for protection against scrapes
Leather gloves for grip
Several layers of clothing
External Resources

New Jersey Moped Laws
 

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
So who is going to tell me if my huffy with an 80 cc engine is legal in NJ, and I'm not getting it, do I own a moped ?

I still am not sure what a 1.5 hp displacement is, does that mean a braking distance with a force of 1,5hp ?

Something tells me I'm an outlaw ?
Big deal I'll move to New Mexico, I'm also a rebel !
 

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
Moped definition
A motorized bicycle, or moped, is defined by law as a pedal bicycle with a helper motor that has a maximum piston displacementof less than 50 cubic centimeters, or no more than 1.5 brake horsepower,and is capable of a maximum speed of no more than 25 miles per hour on a flat surface.


Yeah, but I have an 80cc Engine and it maxs., at 30mph, and I am not sure about 1.5 brake hp.
 
Last edited:

Dave31

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
You are over the dicplacement and horsepower with a 80cc....I would just lie! You get pulled over tell them it's a 48cc and try to stay under 25mph..

Here in AZ we have to have a 48cc or smaller. Mine is a 80cc, I got pulled over and was asked what size is my motor...I told the officer it was a 48cc. They don't know unless they go to the trouble to check your motor..

You could also use stamps or a electric pencil and put 48cc on your motor.
 

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
OK, Tha sounds a little better, heck I don't have any of the other stuff anyway including a helmet !

So as long as they don't take the bike I have time to change my name and move out of the state.
 

Dave31

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
I would get a helmet, you want to draw as little attention to yourself as possible...but it's a little hard with these bike's....you'll find that out on your own :D

:ride2:
 

Dave31

Moderator
Staff member
Mar 1, 2008
11,204
29
38
Aztlán, Arizona
Oh yeah I forgot to mention...alot of the members who ride in states such as yours, will kill the motor and pedal when they see the law...or just ghost pedal
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
Moped definition
A motorized bicycle, or moped, is defined by law as a pedal bicycle with a helper motor that has a maximum piston displacementof less than 50 cubic centimeters, or no more than 1.5 brake horsepower,and is capable of a maximum speed of no more than 25 miles per hour on a flat surface.



Yeah, but I have an 80cc Engine and it maxs., at 30mph, and I am not sure about 1.5 brake hp.

You are probably by definition an illegal motorcycle.

Welcome to the gang, outlaw.
 

thatsdax

Member
Feb 22, 2008
869
1
16
www.thatsdax.com
For Starters, there is no such thing as an 80cc

For Starters, there is no such thing as an 80cc . So.. You may want to pull your head, and once the piston is up far enough to block all the intake and exhaust ports, measure your stroke, then the bore, then do the math and see what your displacement is. I am willing to bet it is way less than 50cc. But check it anyway. Keep in mind for these 2 strokes, you really need to block off the exhaust and intake ports with the piston and then measure stroke. Since displacement is actually a function of volume of air fuel prior to compression. With a 4 stroke, this is the total stroke within a few degrees, since it has valves and the valves will close within a few degrees of BDC. A 2 stroke on the other hand that has no overhead valves, "some 2 strokes do" but not these, and stroke can only be measured once the valves or valve is closed. For these 2 strokes, the piston is actually the valve. so..If you really want to be accurate with any engine and measure displacement, you would find the point at which the engine begins its compression of fuel air mixture. At this point, you would pour in a liquid and fill up the cylinder with this liquid. Making sure to fill the cylinder with this liquid to where the top of the piston stops. Then pour this liquid out of your cylinder and into a graduated cylinder and register cc's. For a 2 stroke that uses the piston as the valve, naturally you would have to have the ports closed in order to contain any liquid so that you can measure cc's. Convention has it that it is the total stroke, which is true for typical 4 strokes. But.. Technically, Displacement is a function of volume prior to compression. So displacement measurement is actually a function of the type of motor or engine and valving. Keep in mind that some pistons are domed or curved and that is why a liquid would be a better measure of displacement. If you measure using mics , rulers and calipers, you could measure the outside of the piston and then the center of the piston and do an average for a more accurate displacement calculation. Or you could derive an f(x) function for the curve and then integrate using calculus . And then do the math. If you do the math and come up with 40cc or so displacement, then the piston curve and other parameters or moot since that puts you well under the 49 or 48 cc requirement for most states. Also.. These are not mopeds. Not even close. Mopeds come with a headlight, tail light, horn ect ect ect to meet DOT regs for day and night street use. A bicycle does not come with these functions or attributes. A bicycle is not considered an on or off road vehicle. It is well... a bicycle. If you add a motor to assist you in pedaling, they are still bicycles according to federal regs. But.. Some states may add laws to these fed regs and in some places may have them out lawed all together. Which is bad news since we all need to conserve fuel as well as save money. I have heard that Canada has passed a motor assisted bicycle law that permits them now through out Canada. Smart Move. When it is smart, it is smart.. Smart thing to do. Ok.. I am long on wind here so I will cork it. All I want to say is.. Ride safe, and.. Enjoy the ride....:) :ride2:
 

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
Thanks much thatsdax !

First, This is a really important issue and I did not get an e-mail notification on this !! It is the first and only one I didn't, . . I have received after on another post !! ??

OK, having said that, . .
I don't mind at all you getting long on the subject !

I'm a little worried and am hoping you win the bet regarding under 50cc, as I bought the bike from Kings as an 80cc, so wow, thats a lot of difference, 30 cc's.

Well, I'm looking over the NJ laws, I layed a little rubber a few years ago saying goodnight to the crowd at a local gin mill, and the cops in this shore beach tourist trap were all over me like a cheap suit.

That was a few years ago, sorry I don't have my license back because I still owe the state a surcharge.

Sorry about that, I also do Design R&D for projects the government keeps screwing me on, like Homeland Security, and search and rescue technologies, so I'm a little low on cash, having lost about 200 large, to underhanded Defense Department contractors, and having my credit destroyed.

Therefore this might get a little sticky, but man I gotta get around a little, and I'm getting tired of pedaling.

Anyway, I am thinking that the state, here, defines, what a, Moped" is.

So, if they say that your bike is a moped than thats about it I guess ?

I don't think I'm gonna get around there surcharge thing, as I stopped at the MVD, looking into requirements for moped permits.

At first, I was under the impression that the motorized bike was just what I needed, if you know what I mean.

But now its smokey again.

So, I'll be back at this post, I gotta do a little homework here, to make sure, what I have, . . a motorized bike, a moped or a motorcycle.

I'm still jotting around here and there, Smokey has eyeballed me a time or two, but I guess my hassle is his hassle and it may be that his is bigger than mine so far, so for now I'm trying to avoid him.

I believe that I am also going to have to register this two wheel vehicle, doesn't that mean a title or something, heck I don't think I even have a receipt for the engine!
 

Wheel Rush

New Member
Jun 21, 2008
209
0
0
OK, I sort of have and remember that ridiculous feeling with the engine still running ! I think I'm gonna have to hook up my kill switch, . . after all thats what it's for isn't it ?
 

Ilikeabikea

Moderator
Staff member
Jan 27, 2008
2,323
0
36
65
Ptown, Texas
Norman and I were riding our motorized bicycles the other day. We met a city cop and both killed our engines and started pedaling. Norman even waved at the cop. He doubled back on us but we saw him and killed the engines and pedaled again. It was fun.........................:D:D
 

galapoola

New Member
Jun 26, 2008
2
0
0
"Insurance is $78.00 a year at this time"
Which carrier are you using to get that rate for a moped/motorized bike?
 

Radmanfly

New Member
Jul 28, 2008
56
0
0
Oswego, NY
www.farleysradiator.com
You are probably by definition an illegal motorcycle.

Welcome to the gang, outlaw.
Love that...."welcome to the gang outlaw."

I live in NY state. I definitely can say I get a little nervous riding down the road but a couple things have helped me:

First, get mirrors. On your glasses or the handle bars or both. If they catch you with the engine on, your busted. Watch and be quick with the kill switch. And always ghost pedal on flats and up hills....looks natural and doesn't draw attention. Plus a little cardio work out never hurt anyone (except Isaac Hayes, may he RIP)

Second, stay at a perceived normal speed. If you are going 35 down the road, you are going to attract attention for sure between the engine whine and smoke. Plus you kinda stand out going that fast. Not to mention you won't have time to discreetly hit the kill switch.

Third, keep everything in perspective....whats the worst that can happen? They impound your bike? Chances are they will let you go with a warning the first time, but even if you get cited and impounded, look at all the money you saved in gas....Hey, you can afford it!

So have fun but just keep it sane and safe. With some good common sense, maybe we can fly under the radar for a while....it would be a shame if we got a bad rap and got publicly banned or something. :ride2:
 

jerseykat1

New Member
i live in North plainfield, NJ and so far i have not been stopped by the police. But i always start pedaling if i see them near, i tend to take the back streets vs the main roads, and i guess i have just been lucky so far. But it would be nice to have a definitive answer as to what our bikes our considered by the NJDMV so i could ride around town knowing i am 100% illegal or ride around town without fear of losing a bike that i am already about 500 bucks in on and am seriously contemplating the addition of a 200 dollar shifter kit, and pull start. my new addiction.