Old Guys Simplex moto-peddle bike

indian22

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The two rear vertical fork tubes are where I'll attach the two round base/single bolt, handle bar clamps/risers. This eliminates the need for the bulky, ahead stem clamp steer tube. I'll insert a star nut for tension.& to hold a tube cap in place over the tube opening. Completed the conversion will allow the bars to run across the top of the frame neck and ride a couple of inches lower too. I used a similar bar clap setup on the Harley Peashooter build shown in a photo above of the two bikes together. Twin bar clamps are a much cleaner solution for vintage race style builds.

Rick C.
 

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indian22

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Thanks Pete I'll post some photos as I swap the forks. I like the girders and they are correct for a racer so if the occasion or my whim requires it's a quick swap between forks. The earliest model Harley I've seen with a 4 spring fork was a 1926 on a single cylinder bike, yet fairly common after that. I've used this style fork in the past and it's a pretty decent springer ride and robust. Fitment of wider tires is also a plus for the future.

I'm actually in the middle of switching out the motor and doing some mods with the battery and controller to allow the larger motor to run at between 6 and 8 kw. with the large capacity controller and 72 volt battery pack. All just Winter tinkering on my part.

Parts pricing is going to drive some builders out of one off builds I fear or at least limit some design possibilities. Innovators will however find a way!

Rick C.
 

indian22

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More tinkering on a free Cranberry frame that I hacked together using spare everything's that I had laying about. I'm certain I shared a photo sometime back with the original cobble. I rode it some as a pedal bike in the Fall, but I got back at it a few days ago and fitted it with a Sunlite dual spring fork and a repro. hairpin and coil leather saddle. To date I'm out of pocket $75. for the rear rack and drive off stand.
 

indian22

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More tinkering on a free Cranberry frame that I hacked together using spare everything's that I had laying about. I'm certain I shared a photo sometime back with the original cobble. I rode it some as a pedal bike in the Fall, but I got back at it a few days ago and fitted it with a Sunlite dual spring fork and a repro. hairpin and coil leather saddle. To date I'm out of pocket $75. for the rear rack and drive off stand.
Before and after photos.

Rick C.

cranbrook before.jpg
cranbrook saddle.jpg
springer 2.jpg
 

indian22

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As you can see I'm toggling between bikes currently. Yesterday I swapped the HD type springer and girder forks on the electric V-twin. The bar clamps are scheduled for delivery Wednesday so the bars are still fixed on the short ahead stem. Final bar position will be approximately 2" back & 2" lower than in the position shown in the photo.

Before & after comparison. Two quite different looks though I like them both having the bars mounted back & lower on dual clamps will be an improvement and I have the intention to modify the girder fork to a dual post cycle style bar setup too and the leaf spring fork on my Simplex Copper gator could be improved with the exact same modification. The ahead stem is a quick build solution but lacks a vintage look except on the really early style American moto cycles.

I build bikes to primarily ride yet my vintage style bikes I'd like to look the part too. Good brakes and tires typically get my approval despite not appearing, vintage, but if I were building show bikes there wouldn't be brakes, throttle or clutch And each would employ a rear bike stand. Safety and ease of practical use get my nod for daily type riders.

I have back problems that are unique to me and the low bars of racers and that includes bicycle road pedal bikes, allow me to ride bent over. I don't feature many old guys would see this as comfortable, but for me it's necessary and quite comfortable and over the last 15 years of riding like this daily my upper body has strengthened greatly as a result. My back is no longer an issue pain wise, but as I said it's not for everybody young or old.

My more upright riding bikes are ok for relatively short rides, but an hour or two on them I'm really not good for a couple of days afterward. My fat bike does have quick adjust bars so I can get some relief but it's far from ideal even then. My MB is fine as the seat has a long popper function that raises the saddle a few inches relative to the bars and pedals and it's great on long rides.


Rick C.

4 spring 1.jpg
 

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PeteMcP

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Definitely prefer the springer forks on this build Rick. But it's always good to have the option of swapping thing round according to how you feel.
Did you slit the top of the fork tubes to allow the threaded legs of the handlebar clamps to be secured by another pair of tube clamps?
 

indian22

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Definitely prefer the springer forks on this build Rick. But it's always good to have the option of swapping thing round according to how you feel.
Did you slit the top of the fork tubes to allow the threaded legs of the handlebar clamps to be secured by another pair of tube clamps?
Pete since one of my goals was to clean up the bar connection I was loathe to use clamps. I instead used all thread rod with lots of steel resin & made up two guides to center the rods in each tube and when the goop cured I used set screws to secure. That last bit probably not required however.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Thanks for the likes guys and now that the clamps are on the bars I also really like the springer. The fork is actually quite faithfully reproduced circa late twenties & thirties. Harley used these as early as 1926 and on into the war years.

Steve I feature that I may be the only old guy riding with low bars on motor bikes but some of the cafe racer riders are close to this riding position as are all competition road style bicycle racers. It works for my back condition but I'd certainly not try to talk anyone into using it unless they have a similar medical condition. Neck, shoulders and hands have to be pretty strong maintain this riding position over long durations.

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Rick,
must have jumped to the wrong conclusion when you said the bars were double clamped. Also thought i was seeing what look like polished tube clamps situated just under the actual bar clamps.

Love the look of racing bars, but with my torn right shoulder tendons they don't suit me when riding for longer than a few trips round the block.
 

indian22

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Pete your question was a good one as slotting & clamps would work really well. My use of the term clamps by itself was improper and bar riser clamps would have helped. The silver you see is edge on is a view of the thick upper plate that ties and stiffens the two tubes which the bar risers are now attached. This top plate is drilled and could ultimately be used as a point of attachment for a scissor shock for a bit of rebound control, but for now I'll enjoy the cleaner lines of the current bar attachment. I will wrap black leather grips for the bars eventually. The leather strips are already cut to width (3/16").

The actual bar position is altered on each build a little to prevent fuel tank strikes with the bar ends. I rotate the bars until the grips ends are just under the tank at full turn in either direction. I too enjoy the look, but every day riding takes a lot of getting used to. Low handle bar position also effects and greatly limits how one handles the bike while dismounted. They even limit a builders design elements; for example the inclusion of a proper rear wheel stand. I recently watched a Utube video of a fellow struggling to get his classic, extremely valuable, motorcycle both up and off the rear stand by himself. He handled it beautifully yet it was both humorous & scary to watch the process from start up to ride off. I actually held my breath at times thinking a drop was coming. His bike had high bars and it was a chore. Low bars a tail stand is a two man operation on heavier bikes with over 48" wheelbase. Pushing the bike with low bars is also challenging and I've almost laid a bike over on multiple occasions.

Low bars do look great, but for my lower back I'd not ride with the bars lowered to the position I employ.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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My problem is my neck, shoulders and lower back. All those years of being bent over sanding furniture caused it. A lot of it was hand sanding and it messed up my hands as well.

It happened and now I have to adjust to it.

Steve.
Steve trade workers even artists such as sculptors or painters often end up with work related disabilities, but even if we knew it was a highly probable outcome in our youth we would have done nothing different. Reality always requires adjustments of attitude & activity.

I certainly don't fancy pain or disability however.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Rick,
must have jumped to the wrong conclusion when you said the bars were double clamped. Also thought i was seeing what look like polished tube clamps situated just under the actual bar clamps.

Love the look of racing bars, but with my torn right shoulder tendons they don't suit me when riding for longer than a few trips round the block.
Pete photo of the upper fork plate.

.
bar mount e-V-twin.jpg
 

indian22

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Battery work & tank wiring completed and tank installed. I'm getting good at this lots of practice to this point changing batteries and motors out. This setup upgrades bms, 48v. battery & 50 amp continuous controller. It's a 20 amp hr. battery. Output 2.5kw continuous with 4 kw bursts. This is the mild motor setup and with the final gearing shown will most likely be what I will normally run with. The tank just isn't large enough to hold a 25 amp 72 v. battery and range is quite limited with 16 amp. hr. 72v. setup though really fast at peak output of around 8 hp.

I specified a knurled bar center which isn't attractive with the new clamps, but I can repurpose it for attaching an instrument pod if required though I prefer not to have stuff attached to the bars.

There is a huge price difference between 48 v. and 72v, at the same amp hr. capacity. three times or more depending on chemistry employed.

This bike has turned into a test/ learning mule for me and kind of like my Grubee hybrid it's undergoing a lot of changes during the process. Final drive line details are next items to attend to.

Note the rubber O-ring which seals the charging port.

Rick C..

cycle clamps.jpg
electric fuel fill.jpg
hd forks clamped.jpg
 

MEASURE TWICE

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So when may a DC to DC converter come into play? The extra weight and size of the apparatus may make unfeasible. Also the efficiency of the unit may not make it worth it.

On another note, I remember I had a 3 tap battery that was I think 22.5v, 76.5v, and 167v. One of the higher taps I remember gave me a good shock. This was a very low amp battery. A 22.5v battery, individual for B+ on a portable tube radio I decided not to use the radio but keep as a paper weight. They are quite costly and don't last very long. Those batteries are also selling used as just antiques on Ebay?
 

indian22

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MT I looked into the converters a couple of years ago and the amperage out was relatively weak on 48v. I looked at RV , boating stuff and camping equipment. effective I need 100 plus amps out at 48v. The lithium pack I have is a 100 amp out 48v. peak & 50 amp continuous. so a converter has to exceed these numbers to be of use. Weight isn't as big a problem as is the size. At a certain point opting for more pricy lithium pack is the true answer. Converter tech may now be available?

Photo of my RCA Victor world band portable cerca 1950 tube type, portable 25 lbs. or so, nice leather case, big battery. Zenith made one as wel. We had a floor cabinet Zenith tube receiver that was also an all band receiver, 6v. automotive battery, charged by a wind blade on the roof that turned a 6v. car generator & regulator system. Simple long wire antenna for capture that had to be disconnected during storms of an electrical nature which are quite common in Indian Territory to this day.

Rick C.

rca victor  world band potable.jpg
 

Oldbiscuit

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MT I looked into the converters a couple of years ago and the amperage out was relatively weak on 48v. I looked at RV , boating stuff and camping equipment. effective I need 100 plus amps out at 48v. The lithium pack I have is a 100 amp out 48v. peak & 50 amp continuous. so a converter has to exceed these numbers to be of use. Weight isn't as big a problem as is the size. At a certain point opting for more pricy lithium pack is the true answer. Converter tech may now be available?

Photo of my RCA Victor world band portable cerca 1950 tube type, portable 25 lbs. or so, nice leather case, big battery. Zenith made one as wel. We had a floor cabinet Zenith tube receiver that was also an all band receiver, 6v. automotive battery, charged by a wind blade on the roof that turned a 6v. car generator & regulator system. Simple long wire antenna for capture that had to be disconnected during storms of an electrical nature which are quite common in Indian Territory to this day.

Rick C.

View attachment 106339
Be careful with that BB gun so you don’t shoot your eye out !