Old Guys Simplex moto-peddle bike

Tinsmith

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May 15, 2009
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Great back and forth fellas. Informative, as usual, and very enjoyable reading. Wonderful work and insight with regards to how ya'll figure out and solve the mechanical and structural issues that arise. Also how ya deal with the different physical issues that come with age. Still haven't ridden over the past year but am improved to the point I think I can. The carb gaskets are still in need of being re sealed so it'll idle down. You'll know when I'm a ridin' again.
I enjoy ya'll a whole lot.
Dan
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rick,

Between 1988 and 1997 I was model shop supervisor of a company that got a grant from the State of Illinois to develop a EV controller that maximized the then available deep cycle lead acid 6v batteries. The basic design was a EPROM cycling Power MOSFETs. Theory was DC motors controlled by the afore mentioned circuit would plus feed the motors extending battery life . Money dried up before the Mule was tried so I don’t know. I am sure there are a few Electrical Engineers lurking on this forum who may take this and run with it.How does Tesla manage the power feed of it’s cars?

Tom
 
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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Old B. I went to war with that Daisy my first BB gun. It , in my hands, shot a lot of birds and even more little boys. We actually had battles, no eyes lost and very little blood, welts were plentiful. Only an idiot wore short pants to wage battle, but T-shirts were a badge of courage worn during our forays. There was a rule though no head shots & I don't recall anyone getting a BB to the head either. Actually these gun battles were some of our tamer forms of entertainment during those formative years. Butt shots were our favorite to dish out as it proved one had turned tail to the enemy.

Crossman Co2 pellet gun was next but not allowed in battles. I killed breakfast squirrel with that one.

Rick C.

crossman & Daisy.jpg
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
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Great back and forth fellas. Informative, as usual, and very enjoyable reading. Wonderful work and insight with regards to how ya'll figure out and solve the mechanical and structural issues that arise. Also how ya deal with the different physical issues that come with age. Still haven't ridden over the past year but am improved to the point I think I can. The carb gaskets are still in need of being re sealed so it'll idle down. You'll know when I'm a ridin' again.
I enjoy ya'll a whole lot.
Dan
Hey Dan glad to hear from you and congrats on the progress with your health. We do enjoy your interaction and insights. You add a lot to the discussions.
 
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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Rick,

Between 1988 and 1997 I was model shop supervisor of a company that got a grant from the State of Illinois to develop a EV controller that maximized the then available deep cycle lead acid 6v batteries. The basic design was a EPROM cycling Power MOSFETs. Theory was DC motors controlled by the afore mentioned circuit would plus feed the motors extending battery life . Money dried up before the Mule was tried so I don’t know. I am sure there are a few Electrical Engineers lurking on this forum who may take this and run with it.How does Tesla manage the power feed of it’s cars?

Tom
Tom I wish I was more knowledgeable about the tech side of both batteries and controllers, let alone the converters. I study yet can't seem to garner enough info to really get it all sorted. I really need all the theory tied up in a simple knot that I could depend upon and utilize. Completed product that I can plug and play which doesn't involve thousands of dollars. I can spend $2,500. & get one bike to where I want it, but I'm dealing with several bike here and not just the one.

I'd welcome input.

Rick C.
 

curtisfox

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Dec 29, 2008
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minesota
RWS is a nice one Curtis. The good air rifles are super accurate now no comparison to the old Benjamin or Crossman pellet guns.
Not used much now I sold my lake place, 1,100 ft. per sec. even put a scope on it. Killed a beaver with it, but ended up trapping because I couldn't be there all the time. ...........Curt
Dan all the best to you, and get better.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Basics for the 2500 watt Cranbrook "bagger". The leather bags will hold two 25 amp hr. 48v. lithium packs and the controller. Rear hub motor and batteries on order. 50 amp continuous controller set up with 70 amp peak (3500 watt). Amps times volts equal watts. Basically almost all the dollars on this one is in the power train.

Rick C.
cranbrook bagger.jpg
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Nice saddle bags Rick. where did you find them? I have scouted around and the only ones I have seen online that scale to our bikes are ones hung over a saddle horn. Spose it wouldn't hurt to snoop around in some tack shops.

By the way Rick, You know why Daisey came out with the pump action Model 25?
Took the fun out of DD gun wars, biggly. I sure miss my Model 25.
Speaking of Daisey. I was still an apprentice when a new Mold Maker came in, who had lately been tasked with engraving the butt stock molds replicating wood grain and got fired when some very observant person discovered he had managed to incorporate his name in the wood grain. At the time one of the apprentices Bill Steelglove how's grandfather had taken the surname as a prize fighter. Bill asked I wish I could remember his name, could he engrave a steel glove on his Zippo.
Final product was a knights gauntlet gripping a lightning bolt perfectly engraved. I have most of a full set of gravers and never took time to get even half good.
All I did today was go with Mona to Chicago and get the first of two Pfizer Covid shots. No big deal.
Then saw the grand kids for a couple hours. It was No. 2 Son that set us up for the shots. 3 weeks and we get booster.
Stay well,
Tom
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Congrats on the progress Tom I'd call that a fine day well spent.

I do not know the origins of the model 25 pump, however it was banned from use in our battles after the first casualty involving the hard shooting pump gun had to have a BB removed from his shoulder by a real Doctor. I recall there was a liberal spanking applied to the sharp shooter involved without the approval of a military tribunal!

The bags are an Ebay item #124301049864 from India I'm quite pleased with them $60. or so shipped. The first leather bags I ordered for battery carriers for the Grubee hybrid and my mountain bike are really small, which I wanted for those two bikes the battery fits fine (36v. 20 amp hr.) but these bags had to be bigger, but normal horse tack and cycle bags are much too big to look good on a bicycle size frame. The equine bags have a wide strap that is much too long for even motorcycle service with alterations. Horses ass is really big one, thus the common linguistic usage of the term. 12x10x 5 inch vertical dimension being 12". The flaps will cover items longer than 12" though. The bag has several small pouches and is lined to protect items from the oiled leather. For the price pretty decent and I looked at what would suit my purpose not price I was prepared to pay much more for bags that would fill the bill.

Tasteful and modest engraving is something I appreciate on high grade firearms. It goes well with the sharp checkering used for burley walnut. I'm certain you would have made a fine engraver if you had chosen that path.

Rick C.
 

Tinsmith

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May 15, 2009
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Not used much now I sold my lake place, 1,100 ft. per sec. even put a scope on it. Killed a beaver with it, but ended up trapping because I couldn't be there all the time. ...........Curt
Dan all the best to you, and get better.
Thanks Curt, It's always enjoyable to hear the experiences and knowledge on such a variety of subjects. I always come away with a smile.

Dan
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Tom here's a look inside the saddlebags. I discovered it has three inside pockets, two of which are zippered and are full length and bredth of the bag dimension. These are in addition to the main bag pocket. The is also an outside pocket that is very roomy and the large leather flap covers it well.

I've located a Texas saddlemaker that offers a black set of bags that features similar dimensions. Made in U.S. I'll check these out as well. Same price range, under &100.

Rick C.

saddlebag a.jpg
saddlebag b.jpg
saddlebag c.jpg
 

Tinsmith

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May 15, 2009
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Those are nice, and if a Texas outfit can produce something similar for around $100 that's great. Been thinking about making something for my bike. I have the tools and material, just haven't gotten the job done, like so many other things. Thanks for sharing
Dan
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Thanks guys. The bags are working out well the battery packs easily fit.

I made an order change and am going to use 36v. 20 amp batteries and using a front hub mount instead of rear hub power. I also substituted a smaller 35 amp controller with my order. The motor kit is scheduled to arrive tomorrow. The reasons for this change are really simple. I prefer the front drive for all riding except going uphill on loose terrain, such as gravel. This little Cranbrook won't ever see gravel. It's for town transport. Speed isn't important either. Twenty five mph is fine. Pedal assist is easier and when you pedal it's a two wheel drive train! I have extra 36 v. battery packs on hand and this makes swapping packs much easier and initial cost is much lower. The Cranbrook is a Walmart economy bike, short wheel base and running 1,500 watt plus power seems a bit much. It's steel frame and the forks are the good Sunlite version so the front hub is well supported but running 1500 watts on the rear factory drops seems risky. Finally this build was started to use up spare parts and to not spend a lot of $$ on so to date I have spent $355. on new parts for this e-Cranberry 36v. bike.

So that's the long and short of it and it sort of mirrors my Fat ugly electric that I used mostly what I had lying about to build, though it's 48 v. and it is used in gravel quite a lot. It would benefit from the addition of a 48v. rear hub motor for those uphill loose pulls but I'm not sure if I want to make that addition, but I am considering it and the rear electric hub is all I'd need to purchase.....

Rick C.
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
3,948
4,881
113
Oklahoma
Thanks guys. The bags are working out well the battery packs easily fit.

I made an order change and am going to use 36v. 20 amp batteries and using a front hub mount instead of rear hub power. I also substituted a smaller 35 amp controller with my order. The motor kit is scheduled to arrive tomorrow. The reasons for this change are really simple. I prefer the front drive for all riding except going uphill on loose terrain, such as gravel. This little Cranbrook won't ever see gravel. It's for town transport. Speed isn't important either. Twenty five mph is fine. Pedal assist is easier and when you pedal it's a two wheel drive train! I have extra 36 v. battery packs on hand and this makes swapping packs much easier and initial cost is much lower. The Cranbrook is a Walmart economy bike, short wheel base and running 1,500 watt plus power seems a bit much. It's steel frame and the forks are the good Sunlite version so the front hub is well supported but running 1500 watts on the rear factory drops seems risky. Finally this build was started to use up spare parts and to not spend a lot of $$ on so to date I have spent $355. on new parts for this e-Cranberry 36v. bike.

So that's the long and short of it and it sort of mirrors my Fat ugly electric that I used mostly what I had lying about to build, though it's 48 v. and it is used in gravel quite a lot. It would benefit from the addition of a 48v. rear hub motor for those uphill loose pulls but I'm not sure if I want to make that addition, but I am considering it and the rear electric hub is all I'd need to purchase.....

Rick C.

I really hate changing my mind after I post something but it seems I do it quite frequently.