New to the motor bicycle world!

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Cgk_iii, Sep 5, 2013.

  1. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    I know exactly what you mean. The frame on these huffys are soooo weak! Im thinking of getting a new platform to build on like a schwin. Hopefully i will be able to fin a good bike for the low.. Or i might go with a frame that one of the suppliers offers. Well see what my budget allows me to do for now.
     
  2. SuperDave

    SuperDave New Member

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    The ONLY way I would run rim clamp brakes is if I also had a coaster brake. There are a lot of posters here on this site that will tell you coaster brakes are a bad idea on a motorized bike. If that is all you have, it is better than no brakes. They heat up too fast and cannot shed heat, cooking the grease & frying the bearings in the process. Rim clamps apply the friction over a much larger area that is able to shed heat away from the bearing or grease, but require more force to equal the same stopping power.

    By running both hand brakes & a coaster brake, you have esentially a foot powered emergency brake. For normal stopping you squeeze the handle to slow down & stop, but you also have the option of back pedaling for a panic stop. You don't want to use a coaster all the time, for obvious reasons: It's brutal on the hub & bearings, it can easily lock up in soft sand or gravel, and locking it up can & will wear flat spots on the tire, resulting in a subtle wheel vibe that magnifies at increasing speed. Use it only in emergencies when you need to stop NOW! I would rather pay $50 for a new flame tread tire than a thousand dollar hospital bill, on top of a ruined bike and damages to someone's vehicle.

    Servicing a coaster brake is also more labor intensive compared to rim clamps, you have to dismount the wheel & chains just to gain access, disassemble the hub, then there's realigning the wheel properly so the gears won't bind the chain. That can take as much as an hour or more, whereas servicing rim clamp pads is 10 minutes with a single wrench.

    Now disc brakes offer a superior solution, they shed heat better, require a fraction of the grip rim clamps need, they are easier to service compared to coasters, and can lock up enough to throw you over the handlebars. The only downside I can report is disc brakes are noisy, mine moans when applied. But that's a small price to pay for the ability to stop on a dime & give you back 6ยข change. I have no experience with drum brakes so I cannot say one way or another.
     
  3. KCvale

    KCvale Well-Known Member

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    I have heard Schwinn is getting back to quality again but don't know for sure, I haven't built on any new ones but I just in took an old classic Schwinn to rebuild with a simple 2-stroke direct drive for a 'down on his luck' guy that lives in my general neighborhood.

    I have simple advice for new builders, start with a good bike and go from there.

    If you go cheap with poor installation for the motorizing no biggie, pull it off and you still have a good bike.
    Go the other way, well, if you start with crap it will always be crap.
     
  4. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    so finally some updates.

    Installed a manic mechanic sprocket adapter and a 1.95 rear tire. no more chain eating my tire, hooray! Searching for some rim clamp brakes right now. After brakes, im going to start doing some performance upgrades. i fixed the weak points on the frame of the bike and now im back to riding reliably.

    will post more updates once parts arrive!

    some pictures:
    [​IMG]Untitled by cgk325i, on Flickr


    [​IMG]Untitled by cgk325i, on Flickr



    [​IMG]Untitled by cgk325i, on Flickr


    [​IMG]Untitled by cgk325i, on Flickr
     
  5. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    so after enjoying my bike for a solid month, something bad happened.

    Remember when i said that these huffy frames are really weak? Well take a look at what happened to my swing arms...

    [​IMG]Untitled by cgk325i, on Flickr

    Clean break. It almost looks like someone took a cutting wheel and cut the swing arms lol. Like i said before, im going to have to get a new platform and swap everything over. Will probably get a new bike by the weekend. I will keep the thread updated as much as possible.

    Happy Riding!

    Chris
     
  6. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    I have a Huffy karaoke that has been bullet proof since 2010, seems the most trouble with the Huffy bikes is the Panama jack version that has the cargo rack welded on like yours, looks to me like the area that has been welded on crystallized the steel right below the weld which makes the metal very brittle, I'm guessing that is what caused yours to break where it did.

    Even though several of us have had great service with our Huffy bikes, there is no doubt that they aren't the best choice out there for motorized bike builds.

    A Schwinn like this one would probably make a nice build
    http://www.target.com/p/schwinn-men.../-/A-15287656?lnk=Rec|pdp|viewed_viewed|pdpv1

    Firmstrong is another brand i think will make a good build, they have several models but I like this one because of the colors..LOL
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/Steel-Frame...959?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item27ee9c0d3f
     
  7. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    update:

    As i was driving down the road the other day, i spotted a garage sale, only a few blocks from my place. He had a few bikes sitting outside, so i got out and picked up a blue schwinn road/cruiser style bike. i will have to snap a photo of it this weekend.

    I already got the motor mounted and then ran into some issues with the rear wheel set up. I wanted to use my coaster hub wheel from my old huffy onto my new bike only to find out that the axle length is too short, but then noticed that the 'Heavy duty' wheels from bikeberry have a longer axle (about 180mm).

    To get a better idea, the distance between the inside of the swing arms (where the axle sits) on the huffy is about 4" and the distance between the swing arms on the new bike is about 5" There will be about a 1/2" gap between the hub and the new bikes swing arm, so i will have to use a spacer to compensate.

    Also another issue is that the pedal is hitting the motor. Either i am going to fab up some new pedals or grind/bend the existing ones. Anyone have experience with this?


    will update soon with pics.
     
  8. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Some years ago I had a 63 Schwinn American Deluxe and installed my first China girl kit. What a learning experience that was. Like you, I found the pedal crank did not have clearance with the motor... just a wee bit, but enough to make it not work. Someone suggested trying a crankset from a bike made in Japan or China as they are a little wider. I did and it was enough to make the difference. So, I would suggest installing your crank from your old bike, to see if that does the trick. You'll need to swap the whole thing since the threads will be different if the Schwinn was made in America. If it was, congratulations on a good choice for your motorbike. Don't expect breaks in the frame if it came out of Chicago. I do know that after Schwinn was sold and came out of Taiwan that those bikes were also well made as I had one and was pleasantly surprised at the quality. I have no experience with the Schwinn currently being sold, I believe out of mainland China. Good luck to you.
    SB
     
    #28 silverbear, May 2, 2015
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
  9. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    This is an older schwinn. I will have to do some research on how old it really is though.

    Your suggestion about swapping the cranks would be ideal, but there is no way that will happen. The crank on the huffy has a way bigger diameter than the schwinn crank. Ive looked at other options, such as, the wide crank pedal set from one of these motorbike sites, and im not sure those will work either with how small the diameter is on the schwinn.

    back to the drawing board.
     
  10. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Are you referring to the diameter of the sprocket? They should switch okay. If you mean the diameter of the pedal rotation then that's another matter.
    SB
     
  11. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    When you said you have a " blue Schwinn", it makes me wonder if you haven't stumbled on a Jaguar. How old do you think it is? Does it have a metal head badge with rivets or a sticker? If it is a Jag you have a good platform for a new bike.

    Post a photo of the Schwinn for us.

    Tom
     
    #31 2door, May 2, 2015
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
  12. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    I was thinking the same thing Tom, when he said blue Schwinn the Jaguar came to mind, I wish I could find a couple of those bikes myself.
     
  13. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    i wish it was a Jaguar..

    just finished up the build. bought some parts to upgrade, such as:heavy duty wheels, wide pedals, and a new gas tank.

    heres a pic:

    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr
     
  14. mapbike

    mapbike Active Member

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    Nice clean looking bike Cgk_iii
     
  15. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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    finally getting around to updating this thread. I was able to enjoy the blue road bike for a good 3 months until this happened:

    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr

    I didnt wait long before getting a new frame
    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr

    i wanted to upgrade the suspension on this new HKS so i can prevent things like that from happening again, so i purchased some cheap 29" threadless suspension forks and converted the headtube from a threaded system to a threadless system

    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr
    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr

    [​IMG]Untitled by Chris Kallas, on Flickr
     
  16. Cgk_iii

    Cgk_iii New Member

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