motor kit suggestions

RatChains

New Member
Jul 16, 2012
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us
OK so I need some help on a first build. I want to know what motor kits to get. I don't have much funds right now so want to start with a 49/50cc 2 stroke kit but I want to upgrade to a inframe 4 stroke later on, so suggestions on both are needed. The two main things I'm looking for are price and reliability.I'm doing a mountain bike frame but haven't bought one yet so if the kit doesn't have clearance specs I would need that too. Also I'm doing a jack shaft so I guess that would effect clearance issues. Any help would be greatly appreciated!
--also slightly larger motor sizes would be ok as long as johnny law can't tell just by lookin at it. ;)
 
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locell

New Member
Jan 16, 2010
215
0
0
mesa
this kit is pretty much the most popular one:

http://www.kingsmotorbikes.com/product_2218_detailed.htm

Also, one of the best things you can do is to disassemble, clean, and then reassemble the kit before you mount it on the bike and run it. The little kids that make these in china might of dropped a screw in the crankcase and oftentimes there are metal shavings in there etc.

Johnny law can't tell the difference between a 48cc and 66cc, esp if you remove any badges/labels. Externally, They are almost the same thing
 

locell

New Member
Jan 16, 2010
215
0
0
mesa
ahh ya the fins are a little different in your pics, maybe they can tell. The 48cc engines seem to be less and less available/popular while the 66cc engines seem to be gaining popularity. It's also odd that 48cc's are more expensive now then than 66cc's. Supply and demand I guess.

Iv'e never heard of anyone getting in any trouble strictly because of the engine size, usually it's for something else - checking the engine size is a "bonus"
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,326
123
63
Littleton, Colorado
Just a little advice. Don't go for the jack shaft, shift kit on your first build. They aren't as simple to install, adjust and maintain as advertised. You need to gain some experience with a simple installation before adding a lot of aftermarket parts. After you have a firm grasp of what it takes to install and maintain a motor kit then you can start adding improvements. Like the old axiom says, "Keep it Simple". You'll be gald you did.

Tom
 

Dave187cc

New Member
Jul 24, 2012
2
0
0
VA
Hi, another new guy here. Like this dude I also need to go with the 48cc for legal reasons. i was just wondering which kit was the best in terms of ease of installation, tech support (although I could always come back here I suppose), and reliability. So far Bikeberry is looking pretty good with a bike and motor for around $350. American made would be nice too.
 

Drewd

New Member
Jul 25, 2008
425
0
0
Colorado
Just a little advice. Don't go for the jack shaft, shift kit on your first build. They aren't as simple to install, adjust and maintain as advertised. You need to gain some experience with a simple installation before adding a lot of aftermarket parts. After you have a firm grasp of what it takes to install and maintain a motor kit then you can start adding improvements. Like the old axiom says, "Keep it Simple". You'll be gald you did.

Tom
I agree with Tom, the sick bike part jackshaft kit is nice but a PITA because it has no chain tensioner and requires overly frequent adjustments. Its a shame that SBP ignores requests for tensioners and has declined consideration of designs that work for chain tensioner.
 

Dave187cc

New Member
Jul 24, 2012
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0
VA
Ok, so if not BikeBerry which one would ya'll reccommend? I didn't realize there was such a culture around these things. Seems like most ppl on here have a background in dirt bikes or motorcycles, I'm an electrician by trade. Unfortunately this is gonna be my transportation for the next year or so and I just didn't want to be another idiot on a moped, thought I'd do it with some style. I want it to look and run. good but nothing too crazy
 

biknut

Well-Known Member
Sep 28, 2010
6,511
206
63
Dallas
I like the way you think. Since this is your first build, keep it simple. You don't need a shift kit. The 80 motor already goes faster than is safe. Don't expect to cruise faster than 35 mph. That's about the upper limit of safety, and reliability.

Be sure and check the laws in your state about MBs before you waste a lot of time, and money only to find out they won't let you ride it on the street.

I would advise getting a SkyHawk, or Flying Horse motor for a first build. They're less crappy than a lot of the other brands, but not by much. Don't expect much warranty, and you won't be disappointed. Do strip the motor at the very least down to the block. Expect to find a few things needing minor attention like seals, or gears not properly installed.

Expect some teething problems at first. It takes a while to get all the bugs worked out, especially on your first build. After that you'll be able to ride to work everyday and get over 100 mpg doing it.

There's going to be some extra accessories and hardware you'll need in addition to the kit parts. Although you can build a MB for as little $350, for a good dependable MB expect to spend $600 to $1000 before you're through.
 

dmb

Active Member
Dec 4, 2010
1,358
3
36
lakewood ca
if you need a reliable form of transportation i would not get a china 2 stroke if you cant rebuild it your self. trouble shoot many reasons for many problems. this forum is the right place to look for help but alot of people would be outta work if the china 2 stroke was their mule to and from work. unless you work around the corner that is! 4 stroke kits seem to be a more reliable way to go. their's a lot of good things said about tomos mopeds though and reliable is one thing they are. 187=murder and 502=dui either one= prison time
 

donphantasmo

Member
Oct 3, 2010
372
8
18
Middleburg, FL
Man, I agree with everyone.

Start simple. Get a decent bike, put a simple 2 stroke kit on it (without a jack-shaft , or what they call a shift kit). Then after a few months of tinkering and upgrading, you can get a better bike with a shift kit. Or keep that bike the way it is, and get a 4 Japanese 4 stroke.

But, do a search on this forum. Because this topic has been discussed about once a week. I'm sure you'll find all the answers you need in one of these topics.