Hi from the UK - INDIAN Board Tracker tribute, my first build

Discussion in 'Board Trackers and Vintage Motorized Bicycles' started by PeteMcP, Jun 27, 2017.

  1. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    WORKING ON THE HAND SHIFTER...
    Hand shifter parts mostly done. Pics show the shift lever assembly and how the trailing end of the shift linkage attaches to the gear selector. Just need to cut the threaded shift linkage rod and its sheath to correct length. Won't be able to do that till after the shift lever is bolted-up to it's mount, which is one of several water jet profiled alloy parts that'll shortly be welded to the aluminium frame.

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    #201 PeteMcP, Apr 4, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2018
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  2. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    That layout is well thought ought Pete. Rick C.
     
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  3. Velodrome

    Velodrome Well-Known Member

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    Fantastic work! We had a member here a long while back that cannibalized the brass handles to his fireplace tools to make handles like that. Very nice!
     
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  4. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    FSCN3818.JPG HAND SHIFTER INSTALLED...
    Shifter quadrant's originally planned location didn't work. I had planned on bolting-up the quadrant to the water jet profiled alloy fillet panel soon to be installed where the lower top tube meets the downtube. Unfortunately, that resulted in the threaded shift linkage fouling the fins of the cylinder head, so the shifter quadrant needed to be moved upwards and rearwards a touch to get round this issue. Pics show the quadrant loosely bolted-up to its new location on the lower top tube. To help keep the quadrant as close to the tank as possible, I also decided to slightly bend the top of the shift lever outwards a smidgeon to provide adequate finger clearance between the shift knob and tank.
    Grips and inverse levers are now sorted. Clutch and front brake cables route from the levers along grooves conveniently moulded in the underside of the grips. Tidy. Front brake lever accordingly rotates with the throttle's twist grip.

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  5. themountain

    themountain New Member

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    Hi
    I am a newbie to all of that building stuff and I really admire what you have achieved that far! My question would be...are you sure the suspension link can't hit your seatpost?? I am a passionate mtb rider and for me it looks dangerously close that this might happen.

    Cheers and have a safe move to Spain :)
     
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  6. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    Thanks, and good point.
    With me sat aboard, there's presently 40mm clearance 'twixt seatpost and suspension link - and I can adjust the shock to vary this. I guess the big difference between us two riders is I'm never planning taking this bike off-road or making any jumps. It's designed to be and will remain a tarmac queen - a proper vintage inspired 'gentleman's conveyance'. Worst case scenario is I end up swapping-out the bike's 900lb shock for a 1200lb one if I ever do encounter any unwanted metal-to-metal contact.
    Spain's roads where we're headed are like ribbons of freshly laid tarmac - even the minor roads. That's a big plus. Unlike here in Northumberland, UK, where every road is heavily peppered with pot-holes and each ride requires full-on concentration to help avoid a spill or damage.
     
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  7. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    FRAME ALL SET TO GO BACK TO THE WELDERS ON TUESDAY...
    I've finished-up all work on the aluminium frame and it's scheduled to go back to welder Paul on Tuesday to have the various frame fillets and bracketry attached. Pic shows the bracketry mocked-up in position. Another pic shows where I've drilled the seat tube near the bottom bracket to accept the tubular alloy mounts for positively locating the motor's rear mount-cum-jackshaft frame. There's a similar arrangement on the right side of the lower top tube to firmly attach the gear shift quadrant. Once welded, things will be more than strong enough.
    Check out how this bike's personality can be changed simply with the addition of an easily removable rear rack and period-looking brass headlamp. Yep, that's the Lucas Silver King head lamp that kicked-off this project right at the beginning of No. 3's build thread.
    Finally bit the bullet and purchased a pair of fenders. Hope they'll end up being worth it...

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  8. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    So KOOL, you sure captured the look
     
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  9. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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  10. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    You're right Rick, I haven't given much thought - yet - to chain tensioning.
    I do know because of my jackshaft's design and by mocking things up using a chain I have to hand, I should be able to avoid any issues regarding chain alignment. I'm banking on it simply being a case of aligning the sprockets on the as yet over-length key-wayed shaft, then machining the shaft to correct length prior to locking both sprockets in place.
    Correct chain tension on both my previous builds was taken care of either via drop-out adjustment, half links and/or a spring tensioner. On this build - with a third chain thrown in for good measure - I'm anticipating employing a similar strategy. Fingers crossed I can get away with drop-out adjustment on the pedal and secondary chains and - if necessary - employ a spring tensioner on the primary chain. I'll figure it out when I get the frame back from welder Paul.
    So far as a stand is concerned, Build No. 3's low-slung frame doesn't really present an opportunity for me to fit my preferred centre stand arrangement. I was considering fitting a rear stand but the only ones I've been able to find online are for 26" and 28" wheels. This build features a 24" rear wheel - so it may be necessary for me to modify, ie shorten, a 26" stand. Or just go with a side stand on convenience grounds - which doesn't really suit a vintage influenced ride like this.
     
    #210 PeteMcP, Apr 16, 2018
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2018
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  11. CrazyDan

    CrazyDan Member

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    These are very clean builds, I'mma be keeping an eye on this thread. If this is your first three builds, then I can't wait to see what your 10th will be like. The first was great, this last one is epic. Keep outdoing yourself, loving the bike porn :D.
     
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  12. indian22

    indian22 Well-Known Member

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    Pete chain line alignment issues, given enough width between the chain stays for two chains to clear both stays and the wider tire & wheel combination, should not be much of a problem. Initial setup & ongoing maintenance of chain tension through the complete rotation of wheel, three chains & six sprockets mounted on two separate and articulated frames during each complete suspension cycle isn't quite as simple & keeping that initial adjustment during even light & well maintained usage will be problematical. The three chains will stretch and wear at different rates, even using high quality chain & sprockets...pedal chain gets the least pressure placed on it & little wear ensues. I've solved these issues as an after thought (the hard way) & by design (easy way) & both involved the use of spring loaded idlers. I'd suggest finding the room for three hairpin spring idlers, either after market or design your own (the primary chain idler I've usually fabricated) perhaps you'll not use any of the three initially or ever, but on your setup I'd bet you will eventually use all three & be grateful you took the effort to plan for their employment up front. On your setup the primary would seem to be the one requiring a bit of ingenuity, while the other two could simply bolt to the chain stays. Some don't like the look of an idler and some (usually the same who don't like the look) will caution that an idler can rotate into the wheel. My answer to the latter complaint is to use the short style spring idler that could rotate 90 degrees and still not reach tire or wheel & mount it correctly on a straight chain line. Easy insurance. My Simplex has four idlers (the hard way) & now zero chain problems, maintenance & wheel changes are a breeze. The chains runs free and noise is greatly reduced as well.

    The tail drag stand is the simple route and really secure. I too prefer the drive off stand but would require some extra effort. From the photos it appears the jack shaft plates have a small area for a horizontal through bolt and a custom (perhaps curved) drive off stand. Even a leaning stand, my least favorite, would be best designed sooner than latter. You are in the home stretch structurally! Just some random thoughts Pete 'cause I'm really liking where your're at with this build regardless of your future solutions. Rick C.
     
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  13. fasteddy

    fasteddy Well-Known Member

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    Pete, Once again you've created a period correct master piece. The headlight is icing on the cake.

    Timely comments from my prospective since I'm in the middle of the do I or don't I put an idler on the engine chain. The drive chain to the back wheel has one purchased for it. I know it's the wise thing to do but I have talked myself out of the wise thing to do many times with predictable results.

    Back at it tomorrow trying to work out how to make it work.

    Steve.
     
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  14. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    All sound advice guys - which I'll gladly implement, thanks. Following on from experience gained on my Indian and DECOLINER builds, I'm expecting to fit tensioners to the primary and secondary chains on this build when the time comes. Pedal chain too if it proves necessary - but I hope not, 'cause that will only be used when back-pedaling to apply the coaster brake. I'll be in big trouble if I ever have to resort to pedaling this much heavier ride for more than a few seconds.
    Stand-wise, I'll check out the freshly affixed bracketry beneath the jackshaft box soon as I collect the frame back from the welders to see how and where I might be able to locate a centre stand, which would be my preferred choice. Still have the option of a rear stand as a fall back.
     
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  15. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    INSTRUMENTATION THOUGHTS...
    During a recent on-line search looking for grips for this build, I stumbled across a bunch of really neat and oh-so-cheap hand-crafted brass items sold by Enfield County, manufacturers of umpteen neat items for Royal Enfield motorcycles, and many other marques, in India. Not having given any previous consideration regarding instrumentation on this latest build, I couldn't resist a punt on one of these neat 3" dia. compass/sun-dial units (lol). Should look cool mounted up front and centre on the handlebars. Being one of several brass highlights featured on Build No. 3, this latest acquisition has in turn led to me drawing-up a shortlist of names to consider for this bike. Namely; "The Seeker", "Searcher", "Brass'd Off" or "Gnomean Feat". (this last name being a play on the fact it's motor is a vintage '46 Gnome Rhone two-smoker and the tank will be decaled as such). Early days, so any other suggestions welcomed...

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  16. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    Perfect choice ! .........Curt
     
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  17. fasteddy

    fasteddy Well-Known Member

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    Wonderfully interesting instrument. A nice addition to the bike and it will provoke some great comments. If I were to spend that much money on an instrument I'd have to learn how to use it and then I would be Brass'd Off myself as I tried and if I did it would be it would be Gnomean Feat. .

    Steve
     
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  18. PeteMcP

    PeteMcP Active Member

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    Thanks Curt and Steve.
    Costing a bargain basement 11 quid (inclusive of airmail shipping from India!!!) this cool little brass trinket has to be one of my bargains of the year. Even if it never makes it onto the bike, it'll make a nice desk ornament cum paperweight in my office. As well as the vintage motorcycle parts for which they are rightly well known, Enfield County in India offer several maritime themed brass instruments on eBay such as telescopes, sextants, etc. Hard to resist. I had to refrain from snapping-up one of each.
     
  19. fasteddy

    fasteddy Well-Known Member

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    How do they do it for that amount. I was thinking at least $100 plus shipping. At that price it would be hard not to purchase one of each.

    Steve.
     
  20. CrazyDan

    CrazyDan Member

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    Holy cow, 11 quid is just $15.71... is it real brass???? That compass will almost give it a steampunk look.
     

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