Hey guys! Have a cruiser bike and hill climbing power would be nice..

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by JamesCockerham, Mar 14, 2014.

  1. JamesCockerham

    JamesCockerham New Member

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    So, I have a Huffy Nel Lusso 26" Men's Cruiser Bike from Walmart, and also 1 big steep ass hill/ramp/cuthrough to conquer. It's a fixed gear bike and I'm fine with the little hills and other small and steady inclines, but the shortest route to town involves climbing a hill with a very steep incline for a quarter of a mile or so. So, what say you guys? Any advice on what options there are to motorize the cruiser bike for going up and over hills with ease?

    The kits I've seen are generally around $200 for gas power, and may be what will work, but too many options and hills climbing is the main goal here.
     
  2. allen standley

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    Welcome! How much do you weigh?
     
  3. JamesCockerham

    JamesCockerham New Member

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    200 plus or minus 20 pounds depending on lazy factor. So, 180-220 with the 80 lb haul of random stuff coming back from town. The way back is a more steady and gradual incline than the going to gradual and steady decline with one really sharp incline. A round trip will be may be a little under 40 miles, but extra power is really only needed for certain hills. On flat land I think my top speed on a fixed gear is roughly 12 miles an hour, or at least that's what the traffic radar said at the beach. Not in a hurry, I just don't like passing out on top of the mountain.
     
  4. allen standley

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    OK walmart bike. Be certain you look at every weld and be certain no fractures. Next---Remove the fenders. If not properly prepared for the trauma of vibration they will break the tabs causing the fender to fall and get caught in the tires which will cause you great harm.
    Anticipate problems and bugs which will stall you. Educate yourself fully. Watch Utube vids. and explore here on this forum the issues dealt with by hundreds of experienced builders and riders before you.

    Now that is said.
    The kits come standard with a 44 tooth sprocket. Because of your weight and the hilly route I would advise a 46t or possibly 48t, no more -probly rev too high. You will lose top end speed but gain mid grunt. Trust me you need not travel beyond 30mph- you want to be safe and conscience of the fact your on a bike not designed for a motor.
    Good Luck!
     
  5. JamesCockerham

    JamesCockerham New Member

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    Thank you! I'm aware of the quality found in bikes from Walmart, and this one has a few noises I have to work on currently. There are 3 places I'll be using this bike.
    1) To the lake, under a mile one way.
    2) The Dawkins Line Trial that will run 36 miles when complete, currently 16 miles are complete. This is a non-motorized trail.
    3) To town if I can get over that hill with only a reasonable amount of effort peddling.

    The first 2 can be done without added power, the last can also be accomplished without power but not a very enjoyable ride.

    Personally, if your budget was $700 max, what bike and motorized solution would you invest in, and for what reasons would you base your choice on?
     
  6. allen standley

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    This has been talked about before....
    This is what I would do.
    Front wheel- Min 12 guage spokes -Drum or Disc set-up- you NEED a reliable front brake.
    Rear Wheel-Min 12 guage spoke- Coaster or Disc with a sprocket adapter and a 46 (or 48) tooth sprocket. either/any comb. are avail. investigate options here by doing a search. Vendors right and left.

    Others can contribute to what I have suggested. Visit my picture albums. Watch this post.

    Be Safe!
     
  7. allen standley

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    Also - if you want to pedal primarily, you may want to go another direction and consider an electric HUB Motor. Nice assist. Once again do some self educating.
     
  8. massdrive

    massdrive New Member

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    Everything Allen said and more. If the bike is going to be hauling loads of 300lbs. you will need as much mid range and low end torque as possible. The easiest and least expensive engine kits to install are the 2 stroke china kits. They are also the most unreliable, and more expensive to create more power, which in turn makes them even less reliable. A vicious circle for sure.
    A 4 stroke may serve you better. They have more torque right out of the box than a 2 stroke, but they are more expensive and more complicated to install. Performance upgrades cost about the same and as long as you don't take it to the limit it will remain reliable enough for a daily rider. A 4 stroke also has the added advantage of not having to mix gas and oil. A multi speed hub will help you peddle assist up that nasty bugger of a hill too.
    As Allen says; do your research...
     

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