Fuel tank sizes?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by michaelbikin, Aug 5, 2015.

  1. michaelbikin

    michaelbikin Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2015
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am thinking about getting a larger fuel tank, which will help me not worry as much when going long distances, and I won't have to fill up as often, but I am currently getting about 25 miles per fuel tank (I believe I have a 1.5 liter fuel tank on my bike). So, I was wondering, are there any downsides/negatives to getting a larger fuel tank? Is it safe to have almost a gallon on the bike? Also, should I get gel packets or something to reduce vibration on the fuel tank?
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,310
    Likes Received:
    38
    Go as big as you have room for. I typically use motorcycle fuel tanks that exceed 2 gal. No need to worry about "gel packets" (not sure what that is), just run as big a tank as you want/need.

    Check around and see if there is a motorcycle salvage yard near you. You'll have plenty to choose from and only have to worry about how to mount them to your bike.

    Tom
     
  3. Nashville Kat

    Nashville Kat Active Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2009
    Messages:
    1,442
    Likes Received:
    6
    I would answer that there is probably a greater chance of fire disaster, but with any tank we live with that chance all the time- still a smaller tank could minimize trouble. When I thought about going longer distances- finding some distant used car for instance and going to pick it up, cause I almost never go farther than a 6 mile round trip in my area-

    I considered taking some extra fuel along in a plastic bottle, I could dump into the tank when needed and then dispose of- simple!

    there are 2.5 liter and gallon tanks (4 liters I guess) but that's going to add weight and then more likely get in the way of your legs if you pedal.

    A 1.5 tank was standard with kits before I started back in 09, and then the larger 2.5 was more common for a time but now they've gone largely back to the 1.5. I like a smaller tank myself, and with baskets front and back and a trunk bag otherwise- and I usually wear a cycling jersey with the three back pockets, carrying another liter or so in an empty soda plastic. At 61 my MB mileage is dwindling considerably .

    The other option then is a rear rack mounted tank and I think they hold more than the smaller front tanks. I'm still waiting for a small plastic tank that would fit a cruiser frame in the usual old tank way, but the oil controlled forces are not letting that happen. Industrious shop boys haven't graduated to "Plastic" I guess or just want more power and more fuel.
     
  4. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,772
    Likes Received:
    88
    you'll probably at least double that mileage after motor runs in a bit
     
  5. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,708
    Likes Received:
    3
    Same here, I prefer the smaller 1.5 liter tanks but my trips are usually short so the smaller tanks suit me just fine. There are some cool looking moped tanks on ebay but they can be pretty pricy. I'm also looking at tanks from older 50 to 70cc dirt bikes since they can generally be had for around $50 to $70 or so off ebay. The Suzuki jr50 tank looks pretty good on a bicycle frame and I've seen both the plastic and the steel ones on ebay for a fair price.
     
  6. thxcuz

    thxcuz Member

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2012
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just got a dirtbike tank from CL. It's so big I can't use it. It's at least 2 gallons, maybe more.[​IMG] I looks laughably huge so it's going on ebay.
     
  7. Chaz

    Chaz Active Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2012
    Messages:
    973
    Likes Received:
    54
    I always carry two stroke oil (synthetic) with me in pre measured pill container. I just pull up to the gas station, pump in my gas, and pour in the oil and replace tank cap. Then I do about a dozen stops with the front brake of about 8 inches, then shake the bike side to side a few times. I've never had a problem except for once when I forgot to close the petcock at the tank. And that over-rich problem only lasted a few minutes.

    I believe the synthetic oil mixes much easier than dino although I've done the same with it as well. This method works best if you don't wait until your tank is almost dry before gassing up.

    I'm sure some would disagree with this method but it's worked for me for over three years. I always check the tank before I head out and get an idea of how far I can go before refueling. It depends on how far away from any gas station you might expect to be.
     
  8. YesImLDS

    YesImLDS Member

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2013
    Messages:
    958
    Likes Received:
    2
    I see nothing wrong with this as long as it gets thoroughly mixed in. I've thought about doing something like that, but I don't use my bike as main transportation and literally have only ran out of fuel twice! One was at a meet on a long journey and the other was me just not paying attention.
     
  9. Slogger

    Slogger Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    545
    Likes Received:
    3
    There aren't many tanks available at 'bicycle part' prices.
    I have a 2 liter tank, it measured out to 68 ounces. The bike gets really good mileage cruising along easy. I don't bother to fill it up. I put in about 1/2 to 3/4 of a tank and check the level before each ride.
    It seems big enough since I only go 5 to maybe 12 miles on a ride.
    A long, narrow tank would be ideal for long-range riders. 1 1/2 gallons would take me at least 160 miles, at half throttle (about 24mph).
    My old carcass couldn't take the abuse. I'll keep the little one.
     

Share This Page