Bike builders that have machine tools/shops

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
I don't know if retitling is even possible on the forum, but I personally would use that feature if it's possible. There's been a one and done mentality with forum topics that kills the growth of not just the individual participation and interest in a thread but of the forum overall. I'm probably one of the few that feels this way but I do. There is a big difference in those who post frequently on various themes and those who occassionlly ask a question or make an observation.

Rick C.
That's my problem with this thread Rick, views up the bazooty compared to active replies. Ain't like I haven't steered forumites in. I gently do when able.
Tom
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
The 4 jaw came in yesterday and I had it mounted, runouts checked and some one inch aluminum rod chucked, turned and checked for concentricity before six last evening. I'm very pleased with the results and that very little machine work was involved. I did have to borrow some M8 X1.25 studs from the 4" three jaw chuck for coupling the new chuck to my lathe. I've another box of parts for the lathe scheduled for delivery today.

Rick C.
Happy is the man with a four jaw chuck, for he can center parts a three jaw cannot. Or center a rectangular part.
Or if the three jaw is not particularly concentrically capable, the four jaw is micrometerically adjustable.
Good score Rick!
Tom
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Pete thanks and yes it's definitely the chuck to have, if you can only have one chuck it would be my choice. I seldom used a three jaw in commercial applications but hobbyists seem to fear the relatively easy task of centering setup on the four jaw. Easy process to learn and not that time consuming once you've done it a few times correctly.

I've purchased and setup lathes many times over the years this is my third machine setup in the last year alone. I've learned that if you can afford to purchase all the major items including tooling, dial indicators etc. up front you will actually be able to use the machine rather than wait for orders to come in on an add as required purchase. With some items shipping has been slow and some of my stuff just arrived this week with more on the way. This has been several weeks now and the bits and pieces needed to get started on my first planned project are still not all in hand. It's ok but I'm certainly glad I ordered when I did.

In the meantime I've sorted the beast and it's manners are actually quite good on the basic tasks required in brass and aluminum, steel turns ok as well but I'll not be turning a lot of hard steel with this one. I'm actually waiting for some pieces from Bangood to construct a cross drill/grind setup for the lathe, which I require to accurately drill a divider plate on the lathe back plate. Then I'll add a small mill table that can be utilized on the cross slide. These three items can greatly expand the use of the lathe. Once lathe tool projects are completed (for now) I'll press on to some bike stuff!

Rick C.
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
Drilled and tapped 5/16-18 x4 to mount the 79ccHF head mounting bolt holes.
Needed to mount the head on a tooling plate.
Once mounted and clamped in the Mill vise I was able to mill down the intake valve guide 1.9mm.
Allowing the intake valve seal flange to seat properly on the valve spring boss.
This was done after I pressed the valve guides flush in their respective intake and exhaust port pockets.
Tom
 

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indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Tom I've mebtioned my neighbor Mr. Horn in previous posts, but my facination with steam powered transport began as a very small child. He refurbished his collection of steam powered tractors and other farm implements to, as new condition, and he periodically fired them up and drove them through town. He never missed an opportunity to share their stories or display them in local parades. They were quite the sight. We were allowed to play on them and pretend to drive these huge novelties which had, in their heyday, helped feed the nation. I find the Sentinel to be a fantastic example & culmination of the steam age. Thanks for the share!

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Guys my shop is so packed with stuff that needs and will be stored. Then there are five bikes on the floor that can go outside while I work. I'm getting there. In the meantime I've enough room to do what's required right now. So last night I got to it for a few hours and it felt good. Small space has the advantage of not requiring many steps to locate whatever I require that isn't organized where it needs to be,. yet.

Rick C.
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
1,595
3,132
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
In the shop a bit today, flushed the crankcase pre maturely. Forgot to thread and plug the governor shaft hole. Blast!
1/16-27 NPT taps I got.
Bloody plugs?, well Amazon to the rescue. So after the governor hole is plugged, I reckon another flushing.
Also, side cover was mounted in the Bridgeport.
Used a spirt level on the blank oil fill port, and then indicated it to center, X and Y.
Must have used company drill and tap on the Flyer engine filler. Amazon to the rescue again.
Tom
 

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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CA
Make sure work platform is level with respect to work before using drill built in level.

I was trying to get a stuck oil drain plug with rounded hex head out. The wrench I found was the right metric size, but it had a hair line crack I did not see when in the past having the trouble. Got a new socket head, but still to get the rounded plug out? I drilled to use an Easy Out. It got snapped off in the t-handle. Well level bubble on drill was right on. Only I was parked on the slope of the street next to the curb and camber had the Easyout start in center of rounded hex head and then proceed into the female threads of the oil pan. Once I got the Easyout removed with the drain plug still left inside with rounded head, I came upon buying my first set of Bolt Outs. Wastes the rounded hex head even more with sharp cutting in edges that I hammered to get a grip. Then backed out and used new oil drain plug with new socket.

The threads were long enough that at least an inch or more before the wayward drill. The hole only went into the oil pan threads on the inside so no need to buy another oil pan.

Close out sale at Sears... why did I not get the sale price when I was looking... guess no time to wait for a sale as better to be able to drain old oil?

 
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Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
1,595
3,132
113
70
Rubicon, Wisconsin
Well sorta productive, drilled the blank dip stick port of the side cover 23/32 dia.
Then tapped the drilled hole with 1/2-14 NPT.
Thank goodness for a spring loaded tap follower. Mounted in the mill quill it kept the pipe tap running true to the bore.
Tom
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
4,061
5,466
113
Oklahoma
Yeah buddy, I checked my tools and really don't have one at the moment. I've several duplicate tools that I added to my collection without first checking what's on hand and that is really wasteful. Tom I'm not certain what the short spring models were designed for, but I find the concept not appealing for my uses.

Preparing a perfect bore and then tapping crooked is really bad.


Rick C.