Sprocket mounting ideas?

Discussion in 'Hubs, Gearboxes, Sprockets and Chains' started by JaxInsany, May 6, 2013.

  1. JaxInsany

    JaxInsany New Member

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    Hello all! This isn't a very unique problem and would love just a quick response or some advice! I have been struggling with my rear sprocket to center it and mount it on the rear wheel. Its relatively easy to center before I start tightening it down, but as soon as I start... It does what it wants and runs away to one side!

    Long story short, I broke a chain because of wonky chain tension and I need to fix it. What are some good methods of keeping the sprocket centered even as you are tightening it into place? Is there possibly some way I can use a solid guide that will allow it to tighten into place?
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    You could try using some small welding rod or metal shims. Insert the rod/wire/shim stock between the sprocket and the hub in three evenly spaced places around the circumference of the hub. That will hold it in position as you tighten the bolts. Getting the sprocket centered is important but usually not as difficult as getting it to run true with no lateral (side to side) wobble. That takes some patients and careful tightening of the bolts in sequence, alternating from one side to the other.

    Good luck.

    Tom
     
  3. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    I've used strips of aluminum cut from drink cans wrapped around the hub to center the sprocket. Just be careful not to leave too much hanging out. that stuff is sharp!
     
  4. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat New Member

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  5. fatdaddy

    fatdaddy New Member

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    This is exactly why I'm a firm beliver in sprocket adapters. The rag joint works, sure, but it takes some practice and a little experience to get them right. And I don't believe that the SPOKES are the proper place to drive the wheel from. If it were a good idea Honda would be doing it.
    There are a few sprocket adapters to choose from. NONE of them are what I would call cheap, but well worth it. They all drive the sprocket from the HUB, where it should be driven from. It automaticly centers and true's the sprocket. With the added bonus of NOT breaking spokes.
    Just google SPROCKET ADAPTER FOR MOTORIZED BIKES and you'll get almost all that are available. See which size you need, Who has that size, Then get back to us before ordering. We don't want you to over pay for one or perhaps get one thats TOO cheaply made.
    I'm using the Howard Adapter on my bike, but he is not in production at this time. The Manic Mechanic, The Clamshell adapter and the Top Hat adapter are just a few I can think of. You might come up with more in your search.
    Good Luck,
    fatdaddy.
     
  6. JaxInsany

    JaxInsany New Member

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    Thanks everyone for the great pieces of advice! Firstly, I will attempt to use the current rear sprocket with all these new ideas and if I cannot make that work after I put some hard work and effort into it, then I shall look into sprocket adapters. Thanks so much everyone!! This is such a bomb community :D
     
  7. JaxInsany

    JaxInsany New Member

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    Mr. Rat, may I ask what exactly these are used for? Would I mount these on the bike to help guide the chain and keep it lined up with the sprocket at all times?
     
  8. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat New Member

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    as I said I mis read your post. these are used on the axle to keep your
    wheel from moving or cocking in the ( don't you hate it when you forget a word)
    :) dropouts! that's it yea! they keep your wheel aligned properly.

    as for chain alignment I use a ten tooth sprocket I picked up on ebay instead of an idler roller
    I have also found that on some bikes you can get rid of that pesky little part (idler)
    by using the same size chain on each side, not sure why though
    I can't insert pic from edit, next post
     
    #8 Desert Rat, May 8, 2013
    Last edited: May 8, 2013
  9. Desert Rat

    Desert Rat New Member

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    is this what you are talking about when you say keeping chain aligned,
    they won't let me post this pic you can see it here
    http://motorbicycling.com/showthread.php?t=43709
     

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