removing and adding chain links on motorized bicycle chain

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by paul, Feb 18, 2008.

  1. Pablo

    Pablo Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor

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    Frankly because those big ones are a pain in the ass on smaller bike chains! In reality it's good to have both.


     
  2. astronut

    astronut New Member

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    PABLO: yes youre right they are not as good for the regular or "ultra" slim bicycle chains, because they are considered WAY too heavy to carry around with you on rides and tours. the little bicycle ones wich are similar to the ones on the previous page, are lighter and do the job just fine (for bicycles), and are manufactured from things like aluminium too. these however work fine for the shop, and since we arent pedaling carrying one is not a problem.

    These are actually much, much easier to use than the standard bicycle chain breaker. when you say they are too big, you might have come across the larger ones that open chains in some automotive applications for example. that would be too big and more like $25.99. there are different sizes of chain breaker. there are some so small you CAN'T use them on a bicycle chain. :eek:

    BIKEGUY JOE: its best to look in person to see the right size and to save some money on shipping. it makes no sense to pay $7 shipping for an item that costs between $5 and $15 that you can get at any automotive shop, or even sears for that matter. just pull over on your way from work or a shopping trip.

    I would advise to get something decent, instead of going too cheap because a good one these things will last decades (mines used to be my grandfather's). it's a one time purchase. the ones in the 98cent store near my home sells for $4.99 and it looks like its ready to come appart. while for $10 you can get a good one that will last longer. Alternatively you can just get AMERICAN MADE and it will last as long as you. for more money you can get nice rubber on the handles if you have sensitive hands, although its so easy to turn I dont see why. Or you can spend $30+ at motorcycle shops and get them with cool "radical" colors too. rotfl

    this is the size we need for these applications, NOTE: size #41 chain. a very good US made chain breaker
    Roller Chain Breaker #25, 35, 41, 42, 50 & 60, USA Made - eBay (item 260234578188 end time May-03-08 21:35:51 PDT)


    this is one thats too large cheap chinese breaker, I found the smaller version for$5
    eBay Motors: Daido Chain Breaker #60 - #100 New in Package (item 120254296991 end time May-04-08 16:03:30 PDT)
     
  3. toytime

    toytime New Member

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    Until a couple of weeks ago, I was like you Pablo, thinking that the pin end was "rounded over" or mushroomed. From what I learned the pins are not like this at all and even grinding is not needed. That is why a punch and hammer works. It seems to be a friction fit.
     
  4. HoughMade

    HoughMade New Member

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    You are exactly right- a chain breaker is great, but a punch and hammer works fine. I never grind the end of a pin. If you do, it may not hold well if you try to reuse it....which often happens. To use a punch, just put the link up on an old small socket so the pins has somewhere to go, put the punch on the pin, and drive it out.
     
  5. toytime

    toytime New Member

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    thank you, I was bit hesitant to post that because if you look at the pin when it's in place you would swear that it is mushroomed. Common sense would also tell you that it should be mushroomed. Thing is that if you look at the pin when re-moved, it's just a smooth pin....very odd, yet that's how it is.
     
  6. Pablo

    Pablo Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor

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    Nice posts guys!

    Yeah it's not mushroomed over. Agrree!

    I may just buy the large Made USA one. I almost did awhile back.

    I tried to punch out the pin on some new, nice #41 chain - the pin would NOT budge!!! :-||
     
  7. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Thanks astronut....Sears it is!
     
  8. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

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    Here a thought, Bike factorys and parts supply folks:D Belt drives work real well on Suzuki, & Harleys, so why not motorbikes
     
  9. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    If only somebody made one......
     
  10. misteright1_99

    misteright1_99 New Member

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    I punched my new #41 chain to fit. It was hard but you just need to hit it hard once. I did it with a socket and a punch. The old 415 chain was VERY easy to punch out.
     
  11. starrunner

    starrunner New Member

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    Someone asked where to get the chain breaker in the picture. Tractor Supply has that one and even a bigger one.
    Yesterday, I removed 3 links from my 415 chain very easily with one good punch, using a 1x12 board with a hole gouged into it with a knife for the pin to go in. Then today I needed to remove one more link and I gave it a LOT of good punches with a small phillips screwdriver and hammer and the pin would not budge. I gave up and just used the chain tensioner.
     
  12. shiloh0

    shiloh0 New Member

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    i've never used a chain breaker, i just lay the chain over the bench vise and adjust the vise jaws to just allow enough for the pin to go and whack it with a punch, then when its started use the old groundoff nail method. i thought everyone did it this way...more to learn every day. if you switch to the no 41 chain the links, halflinks and masterlinks are way way cheaper and more available, but i guess everyone knows this.
     
  13. starrunner

    starrunner New Member

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    A bench vise would make all the difference for a good surface but I don't have a shop or place to even have a vise, so it has to be the hard way. Last time I broke some chain down to size, I couldn't find my punch. I first used the chain breaker to get the pin started, then pushed an extra chain link into the hole and squeezed it on through with vise grips. If you have an extra link lying around of the same size chain, the pin will be the perfect size for the hole and you won't have to hunt for something else like a nail, which is rather soft.
     
  14. datz510

    datz510 New Member

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    This is the tool I got.. Park Tool CT-3. It was about $35, but well worth it. should never have to buy another one again.. ever. :)

    Park Tool Website

    Pablo, when you press the chain apart, the pins retain the tight fit they normally have when you press it back in. You just press it back together with the tool. To make sure the chain joint is not too tight, I usually turn it around in the tool and press on the other side just a hair until the chain loosens up and has the same side to side play as the rest of the chain.
     
  15. starrunner

    starrunner New Member

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    Yes, that one should do the job. The only drawback on the cheaper one pictured in the earlier post is that the pin is short and only goes about half way into the link, forcing you to have to resort to more primitive, sloppy ways of getting the pin the rest of the way out. The Park Tool appears to have a thinner, longer pin that will go all the way through and push the link pin all the way out in one smooth operation. That's the way to go.
     
  16. datz510

    datz510 New Member

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    Yes.. the Park Tool works very very well & will push the pins all the way through if you want. I usually push them just out of the front of the link and pull it out of the chain like a normal master link. If the link is stubborn, I'll push the pin almost all the way out and then press it back through when reassembling.
     
  17. lennyharp

    lennyharp New Member

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  18. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

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    Wow, tools for the job. I have a chain breaker that you bolt to a board, lay the chain over it and use a wrench to force the pin out, the pin from the tool
    gets stuck in the chain but a couple of taps with a hammer and it pops loose.
    Belonged to my grandfather. Old school but it works well.:ride2:
     
  19. lordoflightaz

    lordoflightaz New Member

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    This thread stopped just where I was hoping to get an answer to Pablos question. So what is the best way to put the chain back together when it is on the bike? I've alway been good at taking things apart

    My chain is toast. New chain with master link, got ate too. Derailleur does not like master links. Running SBP shift kit and a Bell "Speedy Chain" til I think of something. Think I will visit the bike shop tomorrow and see what alternatives there are. I have a heavy duty chain but derailleur doesn't like it either, too wide overall.
     
  20. toytime

    toytime New Member

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    Why not just go without a master link? The pins just get slid back into place and do not need any mushrooming or anything, they just stay in place on thier own. Just make sure the link you worked on is not binding and that the link moves well because they hate going through the rear derailleur if binding even a little. You just have to be careful that you don't squeeze the link too tight as you are driving the pin home with vice grips/pliers or whatever
     

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