Planning a LONG trip

Discussion in 'Travels, Adventures and Motorized Bicycle Touring' started by KG7FOK, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. KG7FOK

    KG7FOK New Member

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    I am planning on making a trip from Mesa, AZ up to the Mogollon Rim up north, about 111 Miles with a Elevation change from 1100 to 8000, has anyone else here in Arizona made this trip or planning it?

    Any other thoughts on doing this would be appreciated as well.
     
  2. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    sounds like fun. Wear something bright
     
  3. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    We did have a member a few years ago that went from Yuma to the Grand Canyon.

    I cannot find his threads but I do remember it was a blue cruiser.
     
  4. CARider

    CARider New Member

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    It's a great time to go next week, 97 high here in Mesa all next week.
     
  5. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    "We did have a member a few years ago that went from Yuma to the Grand Canyon."
    I'd get out of Yuma anyway I could too.
    Good preparation for your ride to the Rim may be riding from Mesa to Tortilla Flats.
    That road is hilly enough to help you make decisions on gearing and setup.
     
  6. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    I just finished a short long trip myself this morning. I went from Rockford Il to Crystal Lake Il--for those unfamiliar with these famous names, that is a distance of about 45 miles. I made it in 2 hours and 8 mins--according to my Cateye--doing an average of 20 miles per hour. Now, having a motor on a bike is a blessing and a curse. The blessing part is obvious. The curse is the motor allows you to be on the bike much longer and sitting much stiller than on a non powered bike. So Mr. A$$ can get really sore and cranky. Also your hands can get numb from the vibration of the engine--even though it might be pretty subtle it still can do a job on the nerves. Bottom line--make sure you have a BIG soft seat on your machine and wear gloves that might absorb or deaden the vibe. You would be well advised to get off the bike every hour or so and walk for a few mins. Just some things to ponder before you set out.
     
  7. Otero

    Otero Member

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    Does hitch-hiking count? :)
    Don't try this in late July, hazardous to yur health.
    It took 6 hours just to get across Phoenix on my way
    back to Durango, 1970
     
    #7 Otero, Aug 5, 2015
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015
  8. mogollonmonster

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    Did you ever make this trip? I live on the rim, and I second what everyone says, and advise you to gear low. I run a 44t rear and plan to gear down before I make my run down the mountain.

    I've been thinking of dropping in on some family in Glendale for Thanksgiving.
     
  9. Otero

    Otero Member

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    Since retiring I've done several long tours on my pedal bike, but I've been
    planning a long motored ride. To that end I've experimented with DIY fiction
    & belt drive setups. I came up with one of each that worked really well, but
    the belt drive was labor intensive to build & to maintain. So, now I'm settled
    on friction. I've set aside spare parts, (clutches,bearings,etc.), and hope to
    attempt a 1500 mile ride in spring. I couldn't load the friction pic, but
    here's one of the belt drive. Guess you'll have to picture the engine on the
    other side and panniers in front. I've used the Tanaka PF4000 for 3 years
    now & it just keeps getting stronger
     

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    #9 Otero, Nov 6, 2015
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  10. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    Very nice bike.
     
  11. Otero

    Otero Member

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    Really Tom, I paid $15 for it,( good solid frame though). The reason
    for the long supports was that I had a number of different sized belts.
    (too cheap to buy new ones)
    Since coming up with a friction roller that works wet, it has been
    exceptionally reliable. At first the stock can on the Tanaka was very
    loud, but once the soot built up in it, it quieted down considerable.
    Having tried a bunch of engines, it's definitely the best.
     
  12. mogollonmonster

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    Very nice bike, Otero! Looks nicely kitted for long trips. I haul a trailer with my China girl, about fifty miles one way for work, can't wait for a real long trip.
     
  13. Otero

    Otero Member

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    I found a couple pic of the bike with the friction setup. On the right in the background
    of one you can also see the trailer I built. The 3rd pic is of my pedal tourer before
    I rode it down to the Columbia Gorge late last June. the motored bike now has a dual
    headlight setup like that of the tour bike. The stuff on the motored was just a mock-up
    arrangement. The actual load is similar, but more ergonomic, with a pannier on the
    opposite side of the motor. The nice thing about the friction drive is that even if the
    motor goes kablooey,you can lift the roller off the wheel & pedal.
     

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  14. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    How sweet they are! How did you arrange it that your set up works in the rain?
     
  15. Otero

    Otero Member

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    Initially I had one of the original Staton drive rollers with the diamond
    checked pattern. this wore fairly quickly to rounded nubs that slipped even
    dry. Using a diamond disc in my dremel,(actually the Black & Decker version
    which is better & cheaper), I cut grooves criss-crossing in the original checks
    an 1/8" deep creating a biting edge the worked like the jaws of a pipe wrench.
    This worked well dry but still slipped wet. Frustrated, since the NW clime is
    wet much of the year, I built several belt drives & found one that worked, but labor
    intensive & needing to be very precise. Finally I came up with an easy, simple
    solution.
    After cleaning up the grooved roller, I burned some #60 grit emery paper &
    panned the the corundum grit from the ashes & mixed it into a paste with J&B
    weld which I applied to the roller. This hardened into the grooves leaving a
    rough but uniform surface the really grips rubber and so far doesn't wear in
    use. If it does, it's a simple matter to clean it & apply more paste. This can
    be done without even removing the roller.
    The downside is that it will absolutely shred a tire unless you pedal off to
    8 or 10 mph before gently opening the throttle. Tire pressure 55/60 pds.,
    roller pressed hard into tire. Finished roller dia. 1 1/8", I don't think it would
    work as well with anything smaller.
     
    #15 Otero, Nov 8, 2015
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2015
  16. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    That sounds like it would work--provided you meet the conditions you state toward the end of the post. You had also better be pretty motivated to jump through all the hoops you had to jump through. Having the tools and knowing how to use them goes into the mix.

    I have a Golden Eagle set up. I can't complain so far. 35cc engine. It will do 25 mph. That is plenty fast for me. In fact, I am happier at about 18 mph--IMHO bikes get tricky when they go over 20 mph.
     
  17. Otero

    Otero Member

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    I agree, bicycles are not engineered to 30 mph under power. Suspension
    helps, but My cruising speed is usually 16 to 18 mph. I'm in no hurry, may
    as well enjoy the scenery. My DIY belt setup works just fine, but if one wants
    to disengage the belt to pedal, you need to tie it off to the side somehow so
    it doesn't end up in the wheel. I researched G.E.B.E considerably. Apart from
    the cost, the glowing reviews taper off sharply after the 3rd year largely due
    to belt failure & replacement cost. Also, 1.6 hp. is about the max hp. sustainable
    power source. Cogged belts are fragile compared to a solid V-belt, but V-belts
    slip without a reduction gear or pulley. My solution was a gripping pulley.
     

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  18. Tom Allen

    Tom Allen New Member

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    I haven't had to replace a belt yet--but I don't ride that terribly much either. Lately I've been using my Honda 150 PCX. I love it passionately. But I must admit, riding the motorized bike is just as much fun, if not more.

    With the Golden Eagle, the drive ring and the drive gear--along with the cogged belt-- are weak points , much prone to wear depreciation.
     
  19. mogollonmonster

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    Otero, your sandpaper idea is genius! That's American spirit at its finest!

    Grandaddy always said, I don't got one, cause I ain't built it yet.
     

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