Old Guys Simplex moto-peddle bike

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Bleeder resistors are used and the only problem with using them is, every time the device is turned on there is a high-in-rush current sent to
the cap(s). A high value supply resistor is used in used around a power relay that supplies current to the cap(s). Some equipment depending
on the application like a HP transmitter used a delay circuit for applying voltage to the caps which bypasses a resistor that is across the relay
contacts. When the delay relay times out the relay contacts close and the caps get the full voltage applied to them without the high inrush current.
A DC supply system is easier to work with versus an AC supply. I am sure the controller has a safeguard circuit built into it for protection.
Good stuff Dennis and though this controller is not the best quality the safe circuit did work and since I ride the hybrid often I'm glad it's not down awaiting a new controller.
Rick C.
 

EZL

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May 13, 2016
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
Advice I can take!
I forgot those old CB days, the Linear Amplifiers plus all of the old tube amateur transceivers, including audio tube amps, all have HV DC/AC
on them for operation. The old hi-power broadcast amplfiers will KILL You! I also want to say that the CDI systems on cars, etc, charge a
HV capacitor to 400 vdc and if you get across the output of one of them you won't forget it! At a low votage of 25 vac 60 Hertz is lethal and
anything above that is deadly. AC will stop your heart rhythm (big hazard) and HV DC will burn you and throw you across the room!
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Got the hybrid figured out & running well, was way too rich without the expansion pipe. For daily riding I only carry one battery on the bike two for longer rides. The 66cc lost some low end performance with the pipe change but the electric can be used to more than offset the loss. I have a 36t rear to clear the disk brake setup so using some electric power during acceleration is huge as is hill climbing. I underestimated a hill yesterday and didn't have much speed built up to climb it but I used both motors till I got the revs built up to finish with just the gas engine. With the expansion pipe this would not have been necessary so yeah low speed torque is down with the kit pipe.

Using the electric for starting really beats pedal starts or kick starts for that matter and this 36v will get almost 30mph on it's own. One oddity with the hybrid that I reported before was that the bike vibrated enough to cause an audible buzz not enough to really feel but easily heard. I think maybe that's gone but not really certain how fast I was going yesterday. I'll mount the speedo and try it again.


Rick C.
 

Tony01

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Nov 28, 2012
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sf bay area
Got the hybrid figured out & running well, was way too rich without the expansion pipe. For daily riding I only carry one battery on the bike two for longer rides. The 66cc lost some low end performance with the pipe change but the electric can be used to more than offset the loss. I have a 36t rear to clear the disk brake setup so using some electric power during acceleration is huge as is hill climbing. I underestimated a hill yesterday and didn't have much speed built up to climb it but I used both motors till I got the revs built up to finish with just the gas engine. With the expansion pipe this would not have been necessary so yeah low speed torque is down with the kit pipe.

Using the electric for starting really beats pedal starts or kick starts for that matter and this 36v will get almost 30mph on it's own. One oddity with the hybrid that I reported before was that the bike vibrated enough to cause an audible buzz not enough to really feel but easily heard. I think maybe that's gone but not really certain how fast I was going yesterday. I'll mount the speedo and try it again.


Rick C.
If it’s coming from the hub it could be the sound of it run by a squarewave controller.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Thanks Tony. It is a hub setup
I've not run it up to a speed at which the vibration comes in as of yet. Before the battery switch about 40 mph and above and this while under gas power or with a combination of gas/electric. As this CG has been modified a lot speed on gas is well over fifty, but I seldom cruise at speeds over 30 mph. With the 36t the motor just loads at 30.
If I find the vibration is still there do you think I am causing damage to the hub motor?
Thanks for your insights as I know you have a lot of insight into electrics/gas bikes in general and hubs in particular.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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BT forum pretty quiet for a couple of weeks so checking in on what's up in my world. Tornado last evening missed us by 8 miles, long track mezzo cyclone style which though it lasted about 8 hours did little damage to cities in it's path thank God.

Rode the hybrid Grubee this morning, really nice out. The stock muffler broke off at the can just leaving the pipe. This was a first for me. I had taken the Thrust expansion pipe off and replaced with the old kit muffler in order to run saddle bags to hold my batteries on the rear rack. The Thrust pipe interfered with that configuration thus the pipe switch. The change was noticable on the low to midrange performance which was expected. Not a huge deal but noticable.
When the muffler fell off I decided to just keep riding and see what change, if any, could be felt. I had the GPS mounted, but not the tach. First test was a 10 degree hill, it being the steepest incline inside the city limits. Dead stop at the bottom pulled straight up, not a problem even with the tiny 36t sprocket; no pedal or electric assist. Then off to a flat just outside the city limits for a quarter mile run up to 40mph. I again was surprised at the ease it came up on power band, which I was struggling to get to with the stock muffler just a couple of days prior. I shut it down at 40mph but it was just getting started. This bike with the Thrust expansion chamber has seen mid 50's and with a Mx 80 chamber low 60's. This motor comes on pipe at 5,500rpm to 6,800 rpm depending on which expansion pipe is used and runs out to around 12,000 rpm from a dead stop more than a half mile is required. I'll mount the tach and wear some safety gear to see what he short pipe can reach. I'd be shocked if it actually performs well, but it felt and sounded really good in the cool air this morning.

This 66cc motor is a reed valve, Delloto carb induction with my own window piston and extra port, jug design. Head is a 6cc after market with copper head gasket and a single base gasket. Though I've never dyno test this motor I feel it must be at least 5hp. I base this on how it feels compared to another motor I tested in this frame which dyno test over 8 hp. It was one serious port timed China girl that one day I might rebuild, the jug is all that it needs, but the case needs to be cracked open to remove the debris from the ring that broke.
The current motor has a ton of hours on it and still runs fresh, way past 10,000 miles for certain. GT5 balanced at Bicycle Motor Works seven years ago and shipped as a port timed motor. I'm convinced balancing is a key factor in motor longevity with the CG motors, regardless of the brand. Running an aftermarket aluminum head and avoiding high compression ratio ensures good cooling which is also critical to these motors. Finally running a reed setup with piston window lubricates the wrist pin with a cool charge of fuel extending the motors life as well as helping with power, if set up properly and carefully tuned. Reed systems typically are not just bolt on power; you have to work for it through tuning and testing and this depends on the motor. I have two identical motors set up the same with reed valves one runs really well the other not a lot better than stock. I never went the extra mile to tune the second engine just copied the exact setup of the first. Shame on me that didn't work! It's setting on a shelf as a backup, but if ever need I will tune it properly.

I like all types of motors 4 stroke, 2 cycle or electric and have a lot of good things to say about all of them yet the typical kit China girl requires some real patience and experience to get right on your own. Using a quality vendor like Norm at Venice bikes, for example, is a good place to start.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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If it’s coming from the hub it could be the sound of it run by a squarewave controller.
Tony the vibration seems to be gone, at least at 40mph, wish I knew exactly what eliminated it, but I tried several small things at one time and it's gone.
One thing I noticed was how much an extra 750 watts was felt at 40 mph. One hp added at that speed was like an extra gear. I only used it for a couple of seconds or so, but really dramatic effect. It's a 36v hub that by itself is only able to pull 20mph or so as this bike is over 125 lb and not a lightweight for sure

Rick C.