Oiling

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by Dougan, Jun 24, 2010.

  1. Dougan

    Dougan New Member

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    So I've got a few tanks through the beast.

    Time to start thinking about regular maintenance. Is there something in the clutch area I should be oiling?

    I just noticed today that when the clutch is disengaged, the rear wheel doesn't spin as freely as before. The difference is subtle, but it's there. You can hear a slight grinding coming from inside the "driveshaft" (not sure if that's the proper term... the part in-between the gear and the clutch. I know it's not the clutch not disengaging properly-- I took the cover off and the grinding is coming from inside. I am waiting for the thing to cool down so I can pull out the plug and look further, but I don't really know what I'm looking for.

    Any advice?
     
  2. Dougan

    Dougan New Member

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    Answered my own question regarding the friction. Left the thread up because I still want to figure out the oiling answer.

    The friction was caused by my chain tension being too strong. Slightly adjusting my tensioner solved that problem. Unfortunately this was after I took everything apart and I now have some new noises, but, I'm sure I can work those out.
     
  3. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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    The one place I know to grease is a dab in between the ring gear and the driving gear on the right side. I also know there's a ball bearing behind the sprocket and shaft on the left side that could be greased, but I haven't had mine apart that far yet.

    As for the bike, the wheel bearings take a beating, and don't forget chain lube. Probably don't have to worry about the pedal crank bearings, since you're not pedaling very much.
     
  4. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    I grease the wheel bearings. Red wheel bearing grease turns black when it's time for servicing. The clutch arm pivot area needs a little oil or light grease now and then. Other than that, just the two that Nougat mentioned.
     
  5. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    keep it clean and it won't heat up as much, and clean your filter out every week or so with carb cleaner (take the cover off, spray the sponge/element, squeeze it out and replace.)

    also, while you have the airbox off, tighten the little nut on the choke if you need to. those are notorious for loosening up.

    oh yeah, don't forget about the rest of the bike. keep it greased and tuned up, like Joe said. without a motor, a beach cruiser can keep the same grease in the bearings for 100 years (though not recommended) but add a motor and grease wears out in a couple weeks.
     
  6. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    Do you remove the clutch cable stop under the carb. and intake and squirt some grease in on the drive shaft and bearings(between the sproket and clutch)?
     
  7. Kevlarr

    Kevlarr New Member

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    Don't forget to put a little light oil on the sponge filter after cleaning it.
     
  8. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    The 54 or so tiny ball bearings in the center of the clutch, where the ring gear attaches to the clutch hub, need a shot of white lithium grease each time you grease the transmission gears.
     
  9. meowy84

    meowy84 New Member

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    I've been wondering about that myself. I'm curious how you go about getting the grease on all those ball bearings and not get some on the clutch pucks? Since the 54 ball bearings are sandwiched in and the assembly is press-fitted together I assume that you haven't disassembled the unit to grease the bearings correct? Also even after you grease the bearings how do you prevent the grease from 'spidering' out and flying against the clutch pucks soiling them? Myself, I've considered (although haven't done this yet) using one of those aerosol graphite lubricants that contain no oil and leave only the dry graphite once the alcohol (I'm guessing) propellant evaporates.
     
  10. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    Do not use graphite! When the solvent carrier has dried (yes, typically alcohol), you are left with a powdered graphite which will easily "fling: out. Also, graphite is comprised of chunks, albeit in powder form, and the bearing balls do not like to roll over chunks. They will tend to skid instead.

    How I lubricate the bearings: I take the red straw that comes with an aerosol can of white lithium (I use Gunk/ Solder Seal brand) and I squish one end of it flat with pliers. Do not squish it closed, just widen and thin out the exit hole.
    Practice squirting a tiny amount of grease on a piece of news paper, that way you will have a feel for the valve on the can.
    Remove the flower nut, outer clutch plate and spring. Remove all the friction pads.
    Push the large ring gear away from the small crank gear to expose the largest gap I can between the ring gear and clutch hub The gap will increase at the rear side of the clutch hub, the side farthest from the small crank gear.
    Squirt a tiny amount of grease into the gap. rotate the clutch half way around and repeat the push and squirt. Do not use too much grease or it will fling out when the engine is running. Over time it will eventually do that anyways, but careful application can reduce it.
    I then lift the rear of the bike off of the ground and spin the back wheel of the bike to turn the clutch hub and distribute the grease around the bearing race.
    After you get a feel for it, you will not have to clean much grease off of the friction surface in the back of the clutch. I clean them with lacquer thinner and a few q-tips.

    Also, if you ever have to remove the clutch for any reason, there are 3 small holes in the back of the clutch that lead directly to the bearing race and bearings. I squirt a tiny amount of grease in the holes, stick my finger in the clutch hub center hole to hold it, and spin the clutch ring gear to distribute the grease around the race.
     
  11. meowy84

    meowy84 New Member

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    Super!!! Thanks for the detailed description GearNut. Sincerely appreciated. :) Thanks for the tip about taking the pucs out to do this as well. Good to know that this method works for you. Obviously it's much better to use tricks already tested by someone else.

    I'm rather perplexed though as to why the factory doesn't put a few small dabs of grease on these bearings when they press fit the assembly seeing as it seems a fairly vital area that otherwise is left with no lubrication at all. I think a lot of people putting their kits together unfortunately disregard this area. Myself I couldn't just "set it and forget it" or I'd have nasty images of galling and chewed up ball bearings dancing in my headevery time I tried to go for a ride.
     
    #11 meowy84, Jun 26, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2010
  12. GearNut

    GearNut Active Member

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    They do grease it. It's just that you cannot put much grease in there at all or it will fling out and contaminate the clutch pucks.
    With regular maintenance, you should clean the pucks with brake cleaner or lacquer thinner as any grease in there will eventually fling out regardless.
    FWIW, you can get by without all of this maintenance, as do alot of folks, but the lifespan of the clutch assembly will be greatly reduced.
     
  13. meowy84

    meowy84 New Member

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    Oh I see. When looking at a certain angle I can see the balls in there and couln't see any noticeable traces of grease that I could tell. So I totally thought they were dry from the factory. Thanks again.
     

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