Non-dished rear drive sprocket?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by flatblack, Jun 16, 2011.

  1. flatblack

    flatblack New Member

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    Ever seen one? That's what came with my kit. Could this be causing the problem with my coaster brake arm fitment? The brake hub is flush with the outside face of the gear which allows the bent arm to rub the surface.

    I'll get some pics up tonight to help clarify.
     
  2. flatblack

    flatblack New Member

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    I've got another thought. After reading more and more about the crappy stock hub/wheel combo, I may forget about my "custom" painted wheels and run my Sun free wheel rims off my Giant STP2. I could just select the gear I want and tension the bike (right side) chain. I've got a brake set that I was going to mount on the front, But it can easily go to the back for now. Single rear break isn't the best option, but will do for the time being.

    Any thoughts on either issue?
     
  3. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    #3 2door, Jun 16, 2011
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  4. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    I had 1 kit in 5 that came with a flat, non dished, rear sprocket. So yes, I have seen them. I was surprised as you are. Since I was working on a Cruiser bike with coaster brakes, I cut the sprocket and shimmed the sprocket away from the spokes to get clearance for the chain. The one I'm working on is a dished sprocket.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M3IPgvZLccI
     
    #4 Al.Fisherman, Jun 16, 2011
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2011
  5. flatblack

    flatblack New Member

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    Got mine sorted. Bent the arm, trimmed the dust cap and went a 1/4 turn at a time on each bolt on the rag joint. Only about 1mm out on side to side movement and .5mm on vertical movement of the drive gear. Then I went I did exactly what I didn't want to do...made the dang chain too short! Didn't even think about the master link only fitting the roller part of the chain...guess that's what I get for being a "car guy"
     
  6. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Flat,
    If there's an Ace Hardware or a Grainger near you they both carry #41 chain, master and half links. #41 is a better option than the kit supplied #415 anyway so you'll be ahead of the game.
    Good luck, ride safe.
    Tom
     
  7. flatblack

    flatblack New Member

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    Yup. Went to Ace. It was a no-go. Northern Virginia isn't exactly known for the "do-it-yourself" mentality. You're lucky to find a lawn mower around here. Can't stand it. People would rather pay WAY too much and sit on their ass.

    Short Rant:
    My wife and I rent a townhouse. Therefore, our maintenance issues are supposedly cover by the property management company. Well, being pretty "handy" having someone take a week to fix a simple problem and then watch them charge a ridiculous fee drives me nuts! Our dishwasher wasn't emptying, so I took the filter plates off, found that a seal in a valve was shot. It was 5 screws total and a regular maintenance procedure. I left the valve, screws, and drawers out. A week later, unannounced at 8am, the good ol' "repair man" showed up. Came upstairs to the dishwasher. I showed him the faulty valve and the 5 screws. He took the part, opened the dishwasher and threw it in. He then said, "Company policy. Can't touch it." Then he walked out. Now the home owner has to pay for a new dishwasher over a $10 part because of this a-hole only recommending a new unit! I was floored.

    Rant over.

    So, ya. Finding a simple chain in Northern Virginia isn't the easiest task.
     

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