Newbie looking for some help on new build

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by Ramallama, Jan 18, 2012.

  1. Ramallama

    Ramallama New Member

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    I'm 16 and live in arkansas. I bought a 49cc scooter a couple months ago, and can't/couldn't get it running. The system is just too complex for me! So now I've decided on getting a motor kit for my bike, put some lights and a horn on it and I'll have a more simple scooter/moped. Anyways I'm looking into purchasing this kit: Motorized Bicycle Kit! Bike Engine Kit! 48cc 2 stroke Bike Motor and KIT | eBay

    I have to keep it under 50cc cause of the laws where I live. If it's over 50cc then I have to have a drivers licence and it'll take me another 6 months of having my permit till I can get my licence. So this kit says that it's for a beach cruiser type bicycle.. And around where I live in hillbilly country nobody has those type of bikes for sale. So will it work on a mountain or road bike? And how hard would it be to install for someone that knows pretty much nothing about motors? And how long would it take to install on a regular mountain bike?


    I really look foreward to getting one of these.. They seem like alot of fun and cheap transportation. So if anyone can help me that'd be great!

    Thanks in advance! :) cvlt1
     
  2. maurtis

    maurtis New Member

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    Welcome Rama!

    If your bike does not have a rear suspension and a pretty open section for the engine, then it should not be a problem at all. Check out the mountain bike and road bike build section of the forums for tips.

    If you do have a rear suspension, this will change the chain tension as the suspension compresses over bumps and you have to get creative with the chain tensioner to make it work.

    As far as installing a motor with little experience with motors, that can be tricky. Some installations require quite a bit of modification to the mounts and bike, some bolt straight up. Some motors need to be torn down and cleaned up, ported, etc in order to run well, some do not. It would definitely help to have someone mechanically inclined to work with you.

    If you could post a picture of the bike you are working with, that would help.

    Good luck!
     
  3. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    Welcome... With little or no experience, these Chinese 2 cycles are a great way to start. If you can follow instructions (instruction manual not the greatest, and that's stretching it), and have some experience using tools it just might be a go. My son had NO experience on any engines, I on the other hand have had too many years experience. He has learned most everything about them. These Chinese HT's are by far the easiest engine I've ever worked on. I suggest you read up on everything that you can find about them before you jump into building one. Heads up....to do one right, planing on a full day, and then some. With my experience, I took 2 (6 hr) days from start to riding. There is only one way to build them, shortcuts WILL get you in trouble....believe me. These engines won't just bolt up on a cruiser without mount mods. Here are some pictures of my second cruiser build, a $300.00 build.

    http://s982.photobucket.com/albums/ae309/Ron-Becker/Mikes HT bike/
    I have compiled a paper, that will help you in your endeavor.

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1GcesQihc7-mm3hJGf7UPiqOaRXZ8ekUT99QUZq2qXXE/edit

    https://docs.google.com/document/d/1aBeJuoS--VQWwXysc07rpscTUbPzgc93xjiQBgsyFjc/edit

    Best of luck should you tackle this project.

    By the way $148.00 for a kit isn't too bad. I paid $107.00 (got lucky on a Ebay bid) for my 1st kit in 3/2009, my latest was $127.00 a year ago.
     
    #3 Al.Fisherman, Jan 18, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2012
  4. Ramallama

    Ramallama New Member

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    Well I don't currently have a bike that I think one would be good on, but I'll be looking around for one. I will avoid bikes with rear suspension. Most of the bikes around here are mountain bikes. So it'll probably be a mountain bike that I'll get.
    I don't really know what ported means but I know how to clean out the carb. I won't have anyone to be working with me.

    I do know how to use most tools. I'm pretty sure I'll be able to mount it properly, but my concern is taking care of the engine. I don't know how to mix oil and gas, and how much to mix.

    Thanks for the links! Those will really help.

    I have a couple more questions.
    How hard will it be to mount it on a regular 26" mountain bike and still be able to use the pedals?
    And how hard is it to take one off and transfer it to another bike after it has already been installed?
     
  5. Al.Fisherman

    Al.Fisherman New Member

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    How hard will it be to mount it on a regular 26" mountain bike and still be able to use the pedals? Most bikes will have plenty of room to mount the engine, but very few will the peddles clear the exhaust pipe..this means that the pipe will need to be bent. Not a hard process.

    And how hard is it to take one off and transfer it to another bike after it has already been installed? Be about the same as installing one on the first bike. Keep in mind that the frames will be different and the engine mounting won't be the same. Keep in mind that the optimum
    "V" in the frame is 75 degrees.
    [​IMG]

    What you see (above) is the instillation with factory mounts. Should (as others have) need to lower the engine, a custom rear mount can be made so the engine can sit lower in the frame.
    [​IMG]

    Engine Mounting pictures by Ron-Becker - Photobucket
     
    #5 Al.Fisherman, Jan 19, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2012
  6. Ramallama

    Ramallama New Member

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    Okay thank you guys so much for your help. Right now I'm trying to decide.. Spend 160 on a kit that'll take a while to set up and can't really be moved to another bike very easily, OR spend 250 and get a friction drive.

    motor bicycle gas engine rear friction kit 49cc RF49 | eBay

    It seems like the friction one would be so much easier to set up, and if something breaks on one bike or if I want to put it on another bike, it would be really quick and easy to switch bikes. What do you guys recommend? Whats the top speed for a friction drive, and can it go up hills well? or would it slip alot? Around here there's lots of hills and that's one of the main reasons I'm gonna get one, is to go up hills easier. So.. Opinions? Thanks!
     

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