introducing my self and asking some questions

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by lightbeast, Mar 12, 2010.

  1. lightbeast

    lightbeast New Member

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    hi my goal is to get a nice cruiser bike form wallyworld, and an inexpensive motor kit i have been looking at the blackstallion 48cc kit from gasbiket i would be putting it on a backpedal breaking bike, will that stop me? could i go to 80cc bike and still be able to stop or would i need more breaks than that? also dos any one have the instalation manual for that bike they could send me ? the link website sends for it is broken i want to look at it and see if this is somthign i could do on my own? sorry for my spelling, grammer. and thank you in advance for the help
     
  2. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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  3. rockvoice

    rockvoice New Member

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    gotta have front brakes!
     
  4. civlized

    civlized New Member

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    Welcome to the forum, lightbeast. Setup and installation is not very difficult(relative to many factors!). The basic kit will go on the basic bike without much need for special tools. If you are looking at a bike with a larger frame, you may need to get a little creative, but still not a big deal. There are many ideas and methods here that can help, whatever your situation.
     
  5. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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    Awesome, another person from IL! I'm in Kendall County.

    I have a 48cc on a Schwinn Landmark, and it goes just fine. And I'm not small by any stretch of the imagination.

    Brakes, from worst to best: crashing into a solid object, Flintstone foot on the ground, coaster, caliper, v-brake, drum, disc. (Although there's little difference between those last two, and there's plenty of argument to be made for drum brakes being more dependable in wet weather.)

    Coaster brakes will stop your bike; they're essentially just drum brakes. But they're small compared to an add-on cable operated drum brake. They're fine at pedaling speeds on a cruiser, but at MB speeds, they can overheat easily.

    If you're trying to stay on a budget, make sure the bike you buy has a place on the front fork where you can mount a caliper brake. If you have a little extra money to spend, buy a Walmart bike that has V-brakes instead of a coaster (you'll end up with a seven-speed, too).

    Or watch Craigslist, police auctions, garage sales, and pick up a used bike with decent brakes. You're more likely to find a mountain bike than a cruiser, but it's worth a shot.

    Cheap, new, good brakes - pick two.

    Oh regarding engine size and braking - the top speed difference between the two engines is negligible. What the 66/80 has over the 50 is power, so it'll get to that top speed faster, climb hills better. I've heard that the 50s will rev higher than the 66/80s, even, and top RPMs equals top speed. If you have to choose, pick the 66/80.
     
    #5 Nougat, Mar 12, 2010
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2010
  6. stevolandis

    stevolandis New Member

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    Welcome- you'll probably have to bend a brake arm for a coaster brake, and these brakes aren't very safe at high speeds. I bought a 66/80cc kit, and seems to have okay power(I didn't add any mods). I didn't try a small engine, so i can't compare. I would go with a 66/80cc engine. Good luck on your project!
     
  7. jimrandolph

    jimrandolph New Member

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    My first build! I went to wallyworld and bought the best mountain bike they had, put a motor on it, it lasted for 2 weeks, then the bike fell apart! get a GOOD BIKE to start, and it will last you. I got a FELT!!!
    Jim
    .trk
     
  8. corgi1

    corgi1 New Member

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    who makes specialize bikes,are the frames any good on them for motors?
     
  9. stevolandis

    stevolandis New Member

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    "who makes specialize bikes,are the frames any good on them for motors?"

    Search around the forum- you'll find some people...

    I think an 80cc engine would help you stop better, because it has more air to compress. With the throttle down, it would slow you down better. I think. With throttle, it would of course have more power.
     
  10. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    You should not use engine braking (what little there is) with a two stroke. It is starved of oil at that point, and it's not healthy for the rings and other moving parts.
     
  11. stevolandis

    stevolandis New Member

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    Thanks for that info! That makes sense. I guess you're supposed to pull in the clutch and use bike brakes??
    I use engine braking with 4-strokes- is that okay?
     
  12. Nougat

    Nougat New Member

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    Engine braking on a four stroke won't incur the damage that engine braking on a two stroke will, because four strokes don't get lubrication from the fuel. However, engine braking on any bike switches the load on the chain to the bottom side, and on to the cheap tensioner. If the tensioner roller or its bracket is not properly secured, you could see catastrophic failure. At best, you'll wear out the bearings in the roller prematurely.

    Keep engine braking as an emergency maneuver, not as regular practice. If your bike doesn't stop well enough on brakes alone, you should invest in better brakes.
     

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