How to let bike idle with clutch?

Discussion in '2 Stroke Bicycle Engines & Kits' started by michaelbikin, Jul 30, 2015.

  1. michaelbikin

    michaelbikin Member

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    My bike idles fine, but what I'm saying is that I need to have the clutch disengaged or it will die, so if I want to walk away from my bike and leave it idling, I have to lock the clutch down which i see people do in videos on the clutch lever on their handlebars but isn't there a button to press or something? It is not working on mine/ or I don't know how to do it.

    Thanks
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    If your clutch lever has a button you need to squeeze the lever completely then press the button in to 'lock' the clutch in the disengaged position. If your cable is a little loose, not adjusted correctly, then the button lock might not hold the clutch completely disengaged.

    However, it is not a good idea to "walk away from the bike" with the engine running and the clutch disengaged. Those lock buttons aren't designed, or made to be that trustful. Engine vibration can cause the button to come out of position and the bike will move on its own resulting in damage to the bike, or injury to anyone standing near it.

    The only exception to this is if you have the type of kickstand (bike stand) that raises the rear wheel off the ground. A standard kickstand will not do that.

    Never leave the bike unattended with the engine running. That's asking for trouble.

    Tom
     
  3. Slogger

    Slogger Member

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    It's askin for thievery, too.
    I can't even turn my back at the neighborhood store. Too many punks standing around.
     
  4. michaelbikin

    michaelbikin Member

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    I just mean in my driveway, not for long periods of time.... I mean to let it warm up before running. I'll see what I can do with that button!, if it works
     
  5. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    It doesn't make any difference where you leave it. You shouldn't trust that button to keep the clutch disengaged.

    As far as "warming up" you shouldn't leave the engine running very long when the bike is stationary. It is an air cooled engine and needs air passing over it to dissipate heat. Short periods are okay, like at stop signs, etc but long periods of idling isn't necessary for warm up or recommended.
    Just get on the bike, start the engine and ride. It will warm sufficiently within a few hundred feet. No need to let it sit and idle.

    Tom
     
  6. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    Usually takes under a minute for a bike to warm up. Letting it idle any longer wastes fuel (not much, but...) and can overheat your engine if left for a long time.

    As two door said, those buttons are unreliable. I've had mine pop out while sitting on the bike at a light while I stretched my arms at a stoplight, almost sending my bike into the intersection, and me backwards on my butt. I sai, "almost." :)

    And, the whole bike will vibrate itself around like those old mechanical football games (that only people over 40 will remember,) and can easily make your bike fall over.

    Just start it up, sputter along for 40-50', and go.

    If you need to tune it while idling, you can park the front wheel up against a wall, lock the clutch and then make carb adjustments, but it may still jump so keep a grip on it.
     
  7. Slogger

    Slogger Member

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    My engine will sputter along for a quarter mile or so..
    I give mine a minute or two of idling, it runs so much better afterwards. (No rock throwing allowed! ;) )
    It is a cold natured little beast, though.
    I don't recommend idling through long traffic lights, though, when the engine is already hot. I shut it off and pop a restart when the light changes.
     

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