Can a 2-stoke engine still run when bike is stopped?

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by nickroa95, May 20, 2013.

  1. nickroa95

    nickroa95 New Member

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    Hi guys, I'm relatively new to the motorized bicycle community. I recently put together my first motorized bike and I absolutely love it! :) But I have seen many people on YouTube supposedly using 2-stroke engines on bikes and coming to a complete stop with the engine running. I want to know if there is a way for me to do the same? Am I going to always have to kill the engine whenever I come to a stop light or stop sign? I don't mind doing so but I would like to know if there is a way for me to put the bike on idle while I am at a complete stop. Thanks!
     
  2. AslansMonkey

    AslansMonkey Member

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    It should remain running providing you have the clutch pulled. If it kills with the clutch pulled and the throttle bottomed then you need to set the idle.
     
  3. nickroa95

    nickroa95 New Member

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    So I pull the clutch? Won't that kill the engine? And how can I set the idle? Thanks!
     
  4. AslansMonkey

    AslansMonkey Member

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    Pulling in the clutch DISENGAGES the engine from the drive chain allowing you to freewheel the bike. It also allows you to get up to speed before popping the clutch to start the engine as opposed to trying to cycle against compression of the engine at a dead stop. When you stop the bicycle you should be pulling in the clutch at the same time as the brakes.

    The idle adjustment is a screw on the side of the carburetor.
     
  5. tooljunkie

    tooljunkie Member

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    if you purchased the kit,the instructions will suggest how to install the clutch cable and adjust it correctly.
    if engine still wont run when stopped,the idle screw needs to be turned in while activating throttle.this will hold the carburetor slide open enough to keep it running.
    use care when adjusting,the carburetor can be damaged if you dont open throttle when turning screw in.

    hope you get it sorted out.
     
  6. Toadmund

    Toadmund New Member

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    Really?

    Do Tell!
    Why would that be a bad thing to do?
     
  7. tooljunkie

    tooljunkie Member

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    the screw binds against the slide,either warping slide or cracking it.
    i read about someone having this trouble before.
    dont recall the exact circumstances but carb was damaged.

    i never tried running the screw in without opening throttle,i do adjust
    down from a high idle though.
     
  8. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    TJ is exactly right. Even though there is a slight 'ramp' where the idle speed screw engages the slide, if the screw is tightened (screwed in) before slightly raising the slide you can damage the slide. Always give the twist grip a slight turn, rev the engine just a little and then go in with the idle speed screw. Backing it out is a different story. You can decrease the idle speed without twisting the throttle.


    Back to the OP's question, it sounds as if his clutch cable isn't adjusted correctly and/or he doesn't quite understand how the clutch works. I'm curious as to how he's been starting the bike. Pedaling against a dead engine without disengaging the clutch would kill me :(

    Tom
     
    #8 2door, May 20, 2013
    Last edited: May 20, 2013
  9. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

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    using the lock button on the clutch lever also frees up a hand to adjust idle
     
  10. nickroa95

    nickroa95 New Member

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    I've just been starting the bike normally. (Pedaling then letting go of the clutch). But I just want to know how it works... If I get the engine to remain on while I am stopped, I will just pull the throttle once I stop at a stop sign?? If so, how do people get to rev their engine? Wouldn't the bike just accelerate if the throttle was pulled? I apologize for seeming like a complete newbie, but I do want to know how it would work. I am very fascinated by these bikes and would like some explanation on how it would work. Again, I apologize if this seems like a dumb question. Thanks!
     
  11. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    When the clutch lever is pulled in it mechanically disengages, or disconnects the engine from the drive chain. There are friction pads that when engaged press against a surface making them spin with the engine. The concept is much like brakes but in reverse. Friction drives the bike and a loss of friction allows it to come to a stop with the engine still running.
    If your clutch is properly adjusted but the engine dies when you pull the clutch lever in then it sounds as if you need to increase your idle speed.

    If the clutch cable is adjusted correctly the engine will continue to run when the locking button is used to hold the clutch lever in. If the engine dies when using the locking button you cable needs to be tightened just a little.

    Tom
     
  12. nickroa95

    nickroa95 New Member

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    Okay, I will definitely take a look at that. Thanks!

    I have another question, I am making my first somewhat far trip tomorrow and I am running on a little more than 1/4 of gas in my tank. I can't find my 5-gallon gas tank so I am wondering if it would be okay for me to just go to a gas station and put a bit of gas to the already mixed gas in my tank and just shake the bike up a bit. Would this be okay? I'm only making a total of a 7 mile trip. Thanks!
     
  13. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Simply adding gasoline to your tank without adding the appropriate amount of oil is not a good idea. Neither is mixing the oil and gas in the bike's fuel tank. What happens is the oil will settle to the bottom and go directly to the carburetor. Your engine won't run on oil. It needs a mix of fuel and oil.
    I strongly urge you to find a container, mix your fuel and oil to the proper ratio then add it to your fuel tank after it has been shaken and mixed. Shaking the bike isn't going to be good enough. Especially if you pour in the oil then add gasoline.

    Tom
     
  14. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    Wow, I thought I'd heard everything....
    But I've never heard of anyone owning a chinagirl who did not understand a clutch.
    I don't even know what to say.
    Practice is about all I can suggest.
     
  15. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Maniac,
    It's a generational thing. Just think how many young people there are who have never seen or driven a vehicle with a manual transmission. It's the same as those who have never seen a TV without a remote, or phone with a dial instead of buttons.

    Even those who were raised in a time of stick shifts, many had troubel mastering the coordination of clutch and gas to get a vehicle moving. Just think what it would feel like if you've never attempted to operate such a vehicle.

    We take such things for granted. They don't. By comparison think of yourself and computers when you were very young and the kids today who are schooled on them from early childhood. :)

    Tom
     
  16. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    You don't have to have a five gallon can a one gallon will do. I have used in a pinch a cleaned antifreeze or windshield washer fluid plastic jug that I clearly marked "GAS ". The chart below will help you mix your gas.
     

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  17. Greg58

    Greg58 Well-Known Member

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    Tom that reminds me just how much automobiles have changed, to my knowledge my 27 year old son has never driven a auto with a "three on the tree " even tho I own one. What we here take for common knowledge is not so common after all. Nick if you have more questions just ask.
     
  18. maniac57

    maniac57 Old, Fat, and still faster than you

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    Yes, I agree. It just shocked me to have the point brought home like that.
    Mechanics are a dying breed.
    Nowadays we have technicians and programmers.
    By the way, no disrespect to the OP. There is no such thing as a dumb question.
     
  19. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    Gotta say, I did a SMH too, and I AM a technician, programmer, AND a mechanic. NickRoa95: learn clutch theory!!! Sounds like you're "riding your clutch" when you let up on your throttle, this is also known as "engine braking", which is a very useful technique for deceleration when used conservatively, but can actually turn into "engine BREAKing" when used inappropriately: if you coast down a long hill with your clutch engaged (throttle closed), the engine will be turning-over without its critical lubrication feed. It's a good way of damaging and perhaps seizing the engine.

    On a side note, and a "tip" of sorts regarding mixing your oil/gas at the pump: I keep a small container of oil, a 1.5 oz cup, and a 12 oz clear plastic ketchup-dispenser I bought @ ACE Hardware for $2. When filling up, I dose out the appropriate amount of oil into the dispenser, pump 6 oz of gas into it from the pump, cap the container, shake it, fill the tank half-way, squirt the mix from the container into the tank, then top the tank off. The combination of the container squirt and gas-hose turbulence assures a good mix; has never failed me. I will eventually bag the cup and put ounce-markings on the container.

    P.S.: I WAS going to imply the clich├ęd "record-scratch" sound at the beginning of this post, but I think that's a sound-effect today's kids are totally unfamiliar with.
     
    #19 Kioshk, May 20, 2013
    Last edited: May 20, 2013

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