why electric

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
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north carolina
well I think that if the battery technology does come around, electric bikes will be easier to build and maintain. Very little goes wrong with the bike engine. They can last for years. I'm just hoping the new batteries won't be too expensive and have a good life expectancy.

Of course it's going to be years before they get out to me Im sure.
 

Andyinchville1

Manufacturer/Dealer
Dec 26, 2007
502
1
18
Scottsville, VA
Never really gave electrics too much thought because of the battery issues but you are right....get that fixed an electrics might have a chance.....I do wonder about the rain tho....you know that thing about water and electricity not mixing....that's might be a little scary for me too.
Andrew

PS - I do like my electric RC cars better than the nitro burners but only because I keep them inside.
 

paul

Well-Known Member
Dec 23, 2007
5,548
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Kalamazoo, MI
i have had electric bicycle out in the rain more times then i can count and never seemed to effect it at all
 

ebikehub

New Member
Feb 25, 2008
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0
ebikes are great for short local trips. Mine goes about 20 miles per charge, but then I have to charge it for 6 hours. It keeps my car from getting beat up on all of the local trips. Now I use the car for highway trips and the bike for errands. Works out perfect, I save on gas brakes and transmission wear. The added bonus for me is that people need to to a double take before they realize that I'm going 20mph w/out pedaling, nobody looks at it and thinks "home made moped". The hub is actually the size of a disc break when spinning. I would never have considered them until I test drove a tidal force a few years ago. 20mph is fast on a bike. For local traffic you don't need a parking spot at the library, bank, supermarket, or post office. It actually cuts down on a lot of time for me. The motored bikes are supposedly better on the hills and would be good for a long trip, but the e-bikes can be very useful as well. Its a free country I guess.
 

paul

Well-Known Member
Dec 23, 2007
5,548
39
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Kalamazoo, MI
i have both an electric and a gas motor bicycle and enjoy them both. my electric i get about 20-25 miles per charge. i have to say i like the speed of my gas powered better but for a cruise around the neighborhood or to store down the street i use the electric one for
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
well I think that if the battery technology does come around, electric bikes will be easier to build and maintain. Very little goes wrong with the bike engine. They can last for years. I'm just hoping the new batteries won't be too expensive and have a good life expectancy.

Of course it's going to be years before they get out to me Im sure.
The battery technology has "come around", it's just a matter of cost.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
ebikes are great for short local trips. Mine goes about 20 miles per charge, but then I have to charge it for 6 hours. It keeps my car from getting beat up on all of the local trips. Now I use the car for highway trips and the bike for errands. Works out perfect, I save on gas brakes and transmission wear. The added bonus for me is that people need to to a double take before they realize that I'm going 20mph w/out pedaling, nobody looks at it and thinks "home made moped". The hub is actually the size of a disc break when spinning. I would never have considered them until I test drove a tidal force a few years ago. 20mph is fast on a bike. For local traffic you don't need a parking spot at the library, bank, supermarket, or post office. It actually cuts down on a lot of time for me. The motored bikes are supposedly better on the hills and would be good for a long trip, but the e-bikes can be very useful as well. Its a free country I guess.
My friction drive gas engine only goes 22 max. and that's WIDE OPEN. It runs about 50 miles on a "charge", (quart tank/200mpg) so the electric like you are talking about is very close to the same...plus it's really quiet!
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
to be perfectly honest I like my ebike a lot. I would use it a lot more if there were inexpensive batteries that would give me 20 miles per charge. I got five miles running the engines constantly on my homemade ebike. I keep it wired up and ready to go in case I need to run to the store and the gas bike is not ready to run for some reason.
 

Norman

LORD VADER Moderator
Staff member
Jan 16, 2008
2,605
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pampa texas
Guys
I'm interested in being able to recharge an electric bike by using solar power or a home made wind charger. Can any of you out there do a show and tell on simple to understand electric stuff. Like a homemade wind charger, how many solar panels size and watts and the stuff to make them work to charge batteries best batteries or cheapest to use. What would be the best voltage size for a motor to power the bike.
Could a starter motor for a car be used as a motor?
I don't know much about these things but would like to as they are legal in Texas.
I'm really interested in using wind power to charge batteries and the solar panels as well.
What kind of electric motor will work that is brush less or is there such a thing? Or like Bob said a monster shop built electric bike.
I'd like to be able to go at least 20 miles between charges and keep the cost to not much more than a gas bike would cost. That last line I probably shot myself in the foot with on cost. Let us know or let me know. Ok you guys who know your electrical stuff let her rip. My old man used to rewind electric motors which I hated cause all they did was hum. I liked the gas engines for the noise etc. Now I wish I would have paid more attention to my Dad's love for electric motors.
Norman
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
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north carolina
For my thinking the ideal would be 12volts.. however my motors are 24 volts.

From what I read an electric motor with brushes will become a generator when you are going downhill. If it isn't draining power, it will turn around and generate it. I saw a blurb on the net about a guy using a starter motor,and actually using the gear drive as the friction drive wheel. Just wired that mother up and off he went.. Those starter motors have to draw one heck of a lot of amps though. I also read somewhere that they won't hold up to the constant running but I have my doubts about that. I think they might work better than what I'm using now.

The electric motor for a friction drive like mine is about thirty bucks. The rest is in the batteries. You could buy two 10 amp hour batteries for about thirty bucks each.

Now I'm not going to say this is correct but here is how they say you figure the draw.

a 240 watt motor pulls 10 amps at 24 volts. so if you are running a 10amp hour battery you could be able to run 1hour drawing 10 amps if you ran at 15 miles an hour you could go 15miles. I always figure the actual loss is ten percent in addition to the use. So figure about 12 miles to be safe.

And batteries are funny things they drain and lose energy gas doesn't you last drop of gas produces the same energy as the first. Not so with batteries. Not to mention if you drain most batteries completely you damage them. It's all confusing.
 
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SeattleMike

New Member
Mar 17, 2008
67
0
0
Seattle, WA
I was 4-wheeling on sand dunes here in Eastern Washington several years ago, and while I was going up a dune my engine caught fire and the engine and lost power. My friends and I put out the fire with beer but then we were completely stuck, facing up a sand dune (and there wasn't any way we could roll back, the only way out of the sand was up the dune).
So I put the truck in the slowest crawling gear, and turned the starter over, and the starter motor powered us almost all the way up the sand dune! It would have powered us all the way up and over but the battery died. It was maybe 50 feet or so, of steep, deep sand. I was amazed at what my starter motor could do. The starter lasted forever after that too!
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
One of the designs for a home made e drive uses a starter motor. It even uses the gear on the end as a drive wheel. I just never tried buy but I bet it would be fine even though they say a starter motor wont run for long periods without over heating. Mine was always pulse drive anyway.

Ps I find twenty mph perfectly acceptable as a bike speed.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Why not put a little motor on it to run you around. Just have to be very careful to slow down on those right turns. Not so much for speed but just convenience for the longer trips to sight see.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
looks like a little friction drive on the basket would do the trick. Strap it down with bungee cords or cables and turn buckles. move around at fifteen mile per hour and kill the engine and pedal to turn right.
 
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