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Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by Crazy Horse, Jan 23, 2011.

  1. DaveC

    DaveC Member

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    Made in the USA or in China like about everything else?
     
  2. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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  3. Mike B

    Mike B New Member

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    Bought a welder, a Lincoln Century 80. Just a little flux core 115 VAC, 80A unit good for up to 1/8".

    Works good, this is my first weld.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    Nice. I have to see about doing some lighter weld with a MIG for both flux and inert sheld gas weld.

    I have a 130 that runs on 115 volts.

    I want to fold and bend some steel to a shape for covers over delacate carb linkages and also moving pulleys and belts for safety. I think it would be OK if I can get it right so I don't burn through all and never attach what I make lap joints for in the folds.

    MT
     
  5. thegnu

    thegnu New Member

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    lap joints are a good trick , heres another 1 you can try if butt welding to light gauge metal an I can get behind it I will clamp a peice of 1/4 inch thick copper plate behind the weld you can weld all day on that copper an it will never stick or burn through.
     
  6. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    So you get enough heat to the work and welds OK, but its sort of the same as laying the metal on a thick metal table as the table is ground an weld the two pieces of metal.

    Moderates the heat some I guess.

    MT
     
  7. thegnu

    thegnu New Member

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    MT if its a steel tabe you can weld your peice to it steel dont stick to copper . but yes the copper will wick away any excess heat .
     
  8. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    If I need to fill small holes I've used a penny clamped to the metal behind the hole then rosetta weld. When you're done the penny will come off and leave a welded shut hole in its place. Good when doing auto body stuff and filling screw holes where chrome or parts were attached to the body.
    Magnets are also useful for holding small, hard to clamp parts in place until you get them tacked together.
    Tom
     
  9. MEASURE TWICE

    MEASURE TWICE Active Member

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    I got a few magnets meant for welding, those triangle laminate with steel of various sizes.

    When I got the minimal training to use time at a shop welding we had a thick metal table, but stuff stuck to it as it was steel. They used a wire brush occasionally to clean off weld splash beads.

    It was said that with the magnets holding the pieces to weld on the table and the table had the ground clamp connected that enough current flows for what otherwise small pieces the clamp connection would be impractical.

    You’ve explained about the copper and that it does not stick but is a very good heat sink, thanks.

    MT
     
  10. OG-Whizzerdude

    OG-Whizzerdude New Member

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    What would be a good guage metal to make a seat pan from. It will have no springs and will be pretty close to the rear fender.
     
  11. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Dealer

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    Whizzerdude,

    I'd have to ask you if flexing is not a problem then use 20- to 16 gauge, if you don't want any flexing go with 10 or 11 gauge. Been awhile since anyone replied with a suggestion so I thought I'd offer my suggestion.

    How did your seat pan turn out?

    C.H.
     
  12. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Dealer

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    Were you naughty or nice last year, did the Holiday Season bring any of you any new Welding goodies?

    Big Boy Toy's Wish List:
    1. Maybe a new Welder Tig / Mig / Stick

    2. Maybe a new Welding Helmut

    3. Maybe new welding accessories ie safety gear etc...

    Well maybe you'll get a nice Tax Refund and purchase that long sought welder or welding accessories.

    Maybe if you don't mind you could share some pic's of your shop and equipment with us.

    C.H.
     
  13. tooljunkie

    tooljunkie Member

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  14. OG-Whizzerdude

    OG-Whizzerdude New Member

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    A big thank you to you Crazy Horse! It's been so long since I posted this I forgot that I did. I never did get an answer until now. I'm new to metal working and this really helps. Flexing is my problem.
    My first attemp resulted in the seat pan pushing the back fender onto the tire and a 100% lock up at a good speed. The little tabs for the wires under the fender caught up on the tread of the tire and locked it up solid. I never knew I could swivel my hips like that but I didn't go down. I was running WFO at the time so that was a good thing.
    I've been watching some YouTube vides on making fiberglass pans but I'm new to that too. I may wind up with the only wooden seat in town. I'm a retired carpenter. lol.
    I can't use a conventional bike seat because in my attemp to gat a bobber look for it, I lopped off the top of the seat post on the frame to lower it. You can cut it off but you can't cut it on. Big mistake.
     
    #74 OG-Whizzerdude, Jan 26, 2013
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2013
  15. Crazy Horse

    Crazy Horse Dealer

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    Carpentry skills can be an asset, JMO. Let us know how this turns out when you've finally decided on a metal or wooden or fiberglass designed seat pan. It all sounds very interesting to me.

    C.H.
     
  16. OG-Whizzerdude

    OG-Whizzerdude New Member

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    Will do. I've been painting the fork after welding and have to get the bike back up on it's wheels before I go for a shape for the seat. It's going to be awhile
     
  17. culvercityclassic

    culvercityclassic Well-Known Member

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    I say wood is a good way to go for a seat pan. I have seen a few people use a skateboard deck.

    I posted a few pictures of a wood frame... A seat should be easy... Lol
     

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  18. tooljunkie

    tooljunkie Member

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    wicked awesome frame.bet it will ride nice.
     
  19. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    OG,
    Have you considered making a seat pan frame from something like 3/8" steel round stock then using wood/plywood for the pan. Of course I'm assuming you plan to add foam or something to absorb the road bumps and unholstery. I've made a couple of chopper/bobber seats using this method and they seem to work fine.


    Tom
     
  20. OG-Whizzerdude

    OG-Whizzerdude New Member

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    2door. I have given something on that order some thought. It's good to know it would work before I start. I still need to get the front end back on the bike. I don't think the paint on the fork is quite dry enough yet. I'm going to start on it next week I hope.
    I still have half of a leather jacket from the thrift store left for the upholstery, Jell pads from the knees of a wet suit and foam. It was a mighty rough ride on my first attempt
     

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