To pedal or not to pedal, caught between two factions.

Otero

Member
Feb 1, 2010
768
9
18
wa
I find myself stuck between the hardcore motored riders & the cycling elitists.
For the most part I enjoy pedaling quietly down country back roads, but
I'm getting old. There are places I want to ride, but I don't want to take a
a month getting there. I'd just as soon throttle my way past the traffic to
get to a more serene byway. I want to tour long distance yet still enjoy
a more casual pace where possible. I almost got kicked off of Bike Forums
when I posted a pic of my compromise touring bike, but I guess they
took pity on me cuz I'm old & have suffered many great wounds. It seems
to me both sides should be allies in a common cause of sharing the road
& promoting safer 2 wheel travel with less carbon footprints. I'm not a
spandexter, but I don't need to go faster than 25 either. Anyway, here's
my compromise bike. It's heavy, but pedals well, yet gets down the road
under power. (3rd pic, stealth mode engine cover)
 

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MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
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I guess you have to wait for others that know more about this to chime in. If they see the sheave, you can say it is electric and pedal fast away.

Seriously, I am not so much having other than going to a bike shop to have a wheel trued and while I would be removing the sheave for them to true the wheel, they would know it is not a regular bike.

The other is it is legal without the pedal and cranks, as I opted for foot pegs only as it is now legal for off-road only as a motorcycle light weight.

MT
 

Otero

Member
Feb 1, 2010
768
9
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wa
I'm trying to have my cake & eat it too. Where motors are not legal, I just
mount the engine cover & pedal,('til I find a back road unlikely to be patrolled?)
As far as that goes, I'm legal off road just about everywhere, and I'm geared
to pedal restricted trails. At 40cc, I'm not as fast as most inframe bikes.
I'm not really worried about the sheave being spotted. My gear hides most of it.
It's barely visible when I'm rolling.
The only reason I visit a bike shop is for parts, & that only if I'm to hurried to buy
online. I true my own wheels & all other mechanical needs.
MBs aren't especially legal here, but I've been riding around here for years, & all
the local cops know it. They don't bother me because I ride with lights, mirror,
helmet & a vest in a safe & sane manner. They even wave when I go by.
 
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sbest

Member
Nov 3, 2015
343
2
18
Nova Scotia
I'm with you.
Broken legs, smashed knees, crushed foot, it is a wonder I can walk as good as I do. I love to hike and explore. I love my KTM 125 but wanted something less offensive, more welcome. I have both China Girl and electric bikes, neither is perfect. Electric is great for town and trail, gas for making distance. Thinking about a hybrid, but want it under 50 lbs if I can.

I pedal even when powered. Find I am gaining strength and cadence. These bikes have been good to me.

Steve
 

Otero

Member
Feb 1, 2010
768
9
18
wa
Wait 'til ya hit 67; I can't think of a better excuse for wanting a motor. This
even though I've got at least 50 miles pedaling for every one under power. I
still pedal 30 miles a week. I can still get a good thrill out of a road bike, or
just a pleasant cruise around the neighborhood. Distance travel is another
story. I don't see myself touring the trails of Tibet, but It's so cheap to travel
by motored bike.(provided you've build one you can rely without out draining
you IRA.)
 

Ludwig II

Well-Known Member
Jul 17, 2012
5,071
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UK
I'm in Britain, where there aren't the trails, and there is a requirement for anything on the road with an engine to be registered. The Cooper & Ludwig Mk2, that's going to be fiddled with tomorrow, may end up on the road where the pedals will be used occasionally for the purpose of low stress exercise. Too much hard work and play over the years means, like most here, I really can't put everything into pedalling. I'd really love to pull a tall top gear hard up a long steep hill, but it isn't going to happen. I'll just give the engine a bit of a hand.

There won't be any comment by cyclists, as the device will patently not be a conventional bicycle.
 
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wheelbender6

Well-Known Member
Sep 4, 2008
3,990
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TX
You pedal very differently when you have gas assist and electric assist. I have owned both.
-With a gas engine, you must pedal to get moving from a stop and then the engine takes over.
-With an electric motor, the torquey motor will pull you away from a stop and then you can pedal to go faster and extend battery life.
-The electric motor is far easier on my knees and it is easier to pedal.
-A good electric kit is far more expensive and I miss tinkering with the gas engine.
 

Otero

Member
Feb 1, 2010
768
9
18
wa
Ludwig, there are trails in Britain. Watch 'World Cycle Videos' on Vimeo. The
Cooper/Ludwig's looking good. There's a lot of laws here, but Thomas Jefferson
once said: " Not only should a man break unjust laws, it is his duty to do so."
For me, It's not a motored bike. If they ask, it's a personal mobility device like
a wheelchair.
My problem with electric bikes is that buying a good one is a 'lot' more expensive
than slapping a motor on a regular bike. That, and the fact that they still don't
have long range capabilities. America's a big place, some times the nearest dorp
is a hundred miles away. As old & busted up as I am, I don't mind pedaling long
distance; it's just that it takes a month to get anywhere.
As to pedal assist, before this last build I did the math on gear ratios & the ideal
cadence to match max torque rpm to thus achieve optimum range. By that I am
aiding the engine, but putting forth relatively little effort.
 
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