Tire Life on Friction Drive

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by ut1205, Sep 13, 2009.

  1. ut1205

    ut1205 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    I just finished my first gallon of gas on my Stanton R/S friction drive bike. Got 115 miles on the gallon of gas. It will probably improve some since the engine has gone throught the "Break In" period but due to the hills around here it probably won't be much better but I am satisfied. It is only a little more than twice what my Prius averages.

    I am concerned with tire wear. Everytime I ride I notice alot of black dust on the engine and rear of bike. In about 90 miles on this tire, other than the "casting ridge" in the middle of the tire, I can't tell that there is a whole lot of wear but there is no way I will get the 1500 miles that BMP says you can get. The original tires were 40 psi max and it was like pedaling a tank. I am running 65 psi on the new tires and effort is alot lower.

    Has anyone gone throught one or more tires on this setup? How many miles did you get between changes?
     
  2. xlite

    xlite New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Messages:
    736
    Likes Received:
    0
    I went through about 20 tires back in my friction phase. With a "round file" roller like BMP it was possible to ride in the rain (barely) but tires wear in 100-200 miles. With smooth iron pipe wet riding was totally impossible but tire lasts 400-600 miles. I get a couple thousand miles from the same tire on my current chain drive HTs.
     
  3. ut1205

    ut1205 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for the reply. Base on what I'm seeing now I am going to estimate 200-250 miles on my current tire. If you figure a $20.00 tire wears out in 200 miles then that is $0.10 per mile. Pretty expensive especially when you figure that gas cost you less that $0.02 per mile. Are you using the same motor on your gear drive? If so, how does the power compare to the friction drive on dry roads. If the power is the same or better then I am ready to upgrade to gear drive using my current R/S engine.
     
  4. xlite

    xlite New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Messages:
    736
    Likes Received:
    0
    My friction motors were several 27cc and 33cc IIRC homelite and one Honda or Ryobi 4 stroke weed wackers. The gear drives are generic 44cc and 67cc chinese 2 stroke kits. The difference in performance is HUGE. And there's the issue with wet roads. However I do miss the light weight friction setups and specially the zero drag penalty.
     
  5. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    1
    Tire wear is more when the tire is new.I guess its just softer high on the tread.Once you get down into the tire..tire wear is very little.Make sure you haven't got the roller down to far into the tire.Also, make sure your unit is sitting flat and not tilted toward the motor side.I personnaly love my friction drive.Once the motor breaks in you will be suprised at how much power these little 35cc subaru motors are!
     
  6. xlite

    xlite New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2009
    Messages:
    736
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oh Yeah... I fogot about my first ever MB. 43cc Dimension Edge Mitsubishi. Crummy mount but it had much more power than any of the weed wacker engines. Closer to the HTs. Wore tires even faster than the wackers though. And let's not even mention those wooden rollers. :)
     
  7. ut1205

    ut1205 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have noticed that my tire is wearing a little more toward the motor side. Will figure out how to raise it alittle this weekend. Makes sense that the tire would show more wear when new.
     
  8. toker_ace

    toker_ace Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    1
    take you a strap and wrap it around the motor and hang it up in the air and then tighten your bolts that hold it in place.Its hard to hold it level and tighten the mount bolts at the same time.Once you get it right you will wonder why anyone would ever mess with these chinese crap? Staton-inc, build a bullet proof set-up!cvlt1
     
  9. ut1205

    ut1205 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    I will try it that way!!!
     
  10. bikenoobie

    bikenoobie New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2009
    Messages:
    8
    Likes Received:
    0
    you can buy a rubber drive roller, they grip just as good as steel and your tires last a lot longer
     
  11. bbb

    bbb New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2008
    Messages:
    73
    Likes Received:
    0
    If you are seeing ''black dust'' you need to engage the roller tighter to the tire...it's slipping
     
  12. ut1205

    ut1205 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2009
    Messages:
    70
    Likes Received:
    0
    I actually measure with a ruler when I set it. Stanton says 1/8 to 3/16 inch. I am setting at 3/16 inch. Will try 1/4 inch and see what that does.
     
  13. fred081646

    fred081646 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 11, 2009
    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have 1000 miles on my tire and it is still going, I might get 1500. I pedel to get rolling and ease in the throttle. You can test to see if your roller is slipping by listining to your engine rpm's when you hit the throttle. If your roller is slipping on the tire you will eat up tires. I use quite alot of pressure on the roller to tire. You can,t jamb the throttle on a friction drive like you can do with chain drive. Hope this helps. Fred
     

Share This Page