the perfect motorized bike?

Discussion in 'Introduce Yourself' started by deft, Nov 19, 2008.

  1. deft

    deft New Member

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    Hi. I'm a bike courier in Seattle where we have all kinds of hills and a few bodies of water separating nearby neighborhoods from downtown. I plan on getting a motor vehicle or two this year to help with my work (I am self employed, currently I use hourly rental cars when the need arises). Although I'm looking at 200+cc scooters, if it's possible to throw together a motored bike I might just do that and get van or truck as well. Besides I would just like to put together a motored bike for fun if nothing else. It sounds like a blast.

    After all I've read about motorized bikes I'm pretty sure I have a good idea as to how a good motorized bike should be put together so here's my plan;

    - Start with a full suspension frame, because weight doesn't matter very much and suspension will be good.
    - Install the sick bike parts freewheeling crank kit, gears are an absolute must.
    - Build the rear wheel with an internally geared hub, possibly the Shimano Nexus 8 speed hub because it handles shifting under load better. Use DT Swiss rims on front & rear because they are the most bombproof.
    - Use a really good motor such as Morini (know any others?). I see a lot of cheap motored-bike kits for sale on eBay but I don't trust those engines, especially considering a well built engine will put out more power despite the same small displacement and last longer.
    - Good disc brakes on both wheels.
    - Probably some sort of fairing on the front at least to help with aero.
    - Huge, very puncture-resistant tires with Mr. Tuffy inside.

    Altogether if done wisely I don't expect it should cost more than $1500-2000. I really like the sick bike parts freewheeling crank because with that I can see pedaling and using the motor at the same time.

    I don't know what max speeds I should expect, I would like to try putting a larger chainwheel on the crank to make it faster. If I could get up to a steady 50-55 mph that would be awesome, and open up some short freeway options if I can get the thing licensed.

    I could really use advice as to where to find a good engine, I've seen listings for the Morini engines new but the costs are considerable. I figure I can try harvesting one by looking around for a wrecked Italjet Torpedo (up to 2002) but that would be hard to find. Any suggestions? Are Piaggio motors as good?
     
  2. Dave31

    Dave31 Moderator
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    Welcome to the forum :)
     
  3. Easy Rider

    Easy Rider Santa Cruz Scooter Works

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    Welcome to the forum Deft.
    I have the 5.8 Morini on my bikes and I have no regrets. These motors are built to last. Yes the price is higher than a HT motor but it worth it every penny especially if you plan to use it for work. One of the bikes has a 56 tooth sprocket and it will climb up any hill but will top out at 35mph while my other one have a 47 tooth sprocket which tops out somewhere in the mid 40's. I just bought a 38 tooth sprocket from King's Sales and Service. Hopefully my bike will be able to hit the 50 mph mark and still climb hills. I recommend calling Dean @ Pipelyne. He can give you a price on a complete motor kit with the pipe, tank and brackets included. 408 279 2307
    Good Luck and post pics of your bike when your done.
     
  4. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

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    Welcome to the forum deft. I am with you in spirit 55 mph on a bicycle is real fast. Some of the better bikes use sealed bearings I am not sure how they would hold up at those speeds. Remember the designers never intended for these bikes to go that fast! Brakes are another issue. You have a good game plan just remember these are bicycles.
     
  5. xPosTech

    xPosTech The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder

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    I'm not sure that any of these bikes are dependable enough for a business environment. Well I guess they might be OK if you're delivering pizzas, but not as a courier. After you broke down a couple of times I'm sure you would drop down a bit in the list of who to call for delivery, especially for important documents pegged to a timeline.

    But maybe that isn't in your requirements. If I were in the courier business, I would emphasize dependability of delivery.

    In the price range you stated, I would think a Whizzer or equivalent would suit you. I'm sure you've taken tax advantages into consideration. This would be a business expenditure? Maybe our tax dollars would also paint up your bike in company logo/style?

    Then build your zippy bike for pleasure.

    Did you consider space requirements of an engine and SBT Shifter in a full suspension frame? It can be done but will require modification. Maybe I missed some bikes in this category but I don't know of any where the package will just slip in the frame.

    The Shifter does lend itself to full suspension but it is the derailler at the rear wheel that allows travel along with chain management. An additional jackshaft incorporated into the pivot of the rear triangle works very well, too, if you're set on the Nexus.

    Welcome to the hobby and forum and good luck with your project. Of course (especially with a full suspension shifted drive bike), [​IMG] as you progress.

    Ted
     
    #5 xPosTech, Nov 21, 2008
    Last edited: Nov 21, 2008
  6. xPosTech

    xPosTech The Old Master Motorized Bicycle Builder

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    I almost forgot. The Saddletramp reminded me (thanks). Don't let your health/life insurance lapse. ;)

    Ted
     
  7. jg767

    jg767 New Member

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    I bought the 9.4 hp Morini from Herdan Kickbutt Engines, excellent service. I ordered a tuned pipe, motor mounts gas tank from Pipelyne, was told it would ship out on a monday, 2 weeks later, I finally reached Dean at Pipelyne, he said it was shipping out that day, said he would call me back in 2 hrs. with atracking #,never heard from him again, a week later reached his associate, was told Dean would call me back wittin 2 hours, never heard back. I keep callingh but only get a machine. After a month of them blowing smoke up my *****, I give up. I will now fabricate my own motor mounts and order a tuned pipe from Herdan, more money, but you get what you pay for? If I had known from the start about Pipelynes poor service, I would have saved myself from a lot of aggravation,not to mention that It set this build back a month.
     
  8. Rayzor

    Rayzor New Member

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    sounds like a fun build, but if you have hills all over and need to go on freeways, i would just buy a scooter
     
  9. Clotho

    Clotho Member

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    Hi and welcome to the forum.

    The Morini motors are great. I don't know how you are going to get it to work with any of the Sick-Bike-Parts freewheels or shift kits though. The drive on the Morini is on the left. You will need a Jackshaft of some sort to get it to the peddle drive side. The Sick-Bike-Parts Shift-Kit/Jackshaft won't bolt up to the Morini. You really don't need it though. That motor revs so high that a single gear is more than adequate.

    Sounds like a great project!
     

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