sixthreezero Around The Block Men's 26 inch build

Thekasspell

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Jan 17, 2017
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Recently I have been looking at building a motorized bike, and stumbled across a frame I really like, the only thing is it is a 18 inch frame, but it looks like it would fit a 2 stroke engine.

Here is the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0176FSSPU/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

Does anyone have experiences in smaller frames like this? Does it appear like it would fit?

Thank you for any help, this will be my first build, along with my first post here.
 
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ultralight01

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Oct 30, 2016
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Hood River, Oregon
It will fit it. the problem is brakes. It only has a coaster brake wheel. You need DISC brakes on the front wheel at least, in order to stop within 8 feet or so. anything besides disc brakes is horrible on a motorized bike.

If you go with this bike you'll need a new fork and wheels. I would look for a mountain bike with disc brakes on craigslist or online. Cruiser bikes are fine but they never come with disc brake compatible wheels.
 

Tyler6357

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Mar 15, 2012
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I agree, you want breaks on both the front and back wheels, coaster breaks are not designed to stop a motorized bicycle. Caliper "V" brakes are fine though, disc is better but not required. I have gone 1000s of miles with my V breaks and haven't even had to replace the pads once yet.
 
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Thekasspell

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Jan 17, 2017
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Germany
I was planning on putting disc brakes on the front wheels and calipers on the back, ditching the whole coaster brake arm on the back as well.
Why do you recommend a new fork and wheels? Would it be for a better set up for brakes/ allowing use of disc brakes, or does it appear the current ones would not last/break?
 
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curtisfox

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Dec 29, 2008
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minesota
Don't really need them if you use caliper V brakes, it's just that mounting disk on regular wheels is hard to do. Unless they have the mounting for it. Getting a new fork would be up to you , just that they have suspension, and mounts for disk, if you get the right one. The fork you want should have a mount for caliper brake..........Curt
 
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ultralight01

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Hood River, Oregon
Normally walmart bikes don't have disc mounta, you need new wheels or hubs to add disc rotors. Some with the fork, but there are mounts for disc brake calipers that adapt to simple forks.
 

EZL

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May 13, 2016
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
I agree, you want breaks on both the front and back wheels, coaster breaks are not designed to stop a motorized bicycle. Caliper "V" brakes are fine though, disc is better but not required. I have gone 1000s of miles with my V breaks and haven't even had to replace the pads once yet.
I've been working on a Sixthreezero with a 7-speed in the barrel setup. I remove the shifter and have mounted a 212cc
on it and the bike has more than enough room for a 79cc and even the 212cc "Death-Row bike kit" the mount is a
CNC sent with the kit. The CNC mount should have been longer in length. The mount which would force you to
extend one of the post mounts. I have extended one of the mount (rear seat post mount) and left out two of the
stainless cap screws to keep the engine level. I built a front mount that is attached to the front of the engine which
was originally used for the stock gas tank. This mount is clamped to the front tube of the bike. A channel that is
10 1/2" or 11" long that would replace the original CNC aluminum channel would be the way to go and if a fella
could locate a steel or aluminum channel 7 1/2" x 4 1/8" extended to 11" x 4 1/8" long. The channel would have to
drilled/slotted out for mounting the engine and to use the existing aluminum end mounts would be the way to go.
I managed to tip the engine in the back a few degrees and was able to mount the existing CNC mount but would
rather have the engine sitting level. The GasBike company sells the engine kits and also has the CNC mount that
bolt to the seat tube which has the engine vertically. I might order one to see it it would work on this bike. I wanted
the single speed bike with the instead of the 7-speed that was sent to me. I am not certain that the rear axle bearings
can handle this engine since the axle hub is a 1" size. A single speed has the 1.5" hub and uses a coaster brake
which is good for the 1.5" sprocket hub clamp. You don't have enough sideways movement for clamping to the
hub with the 1" hub. I am seriously thinking of going to mag wheels front and rear with the sprockets and mount.
The V-breaks are ok but a set of disk brakes would be better on this bike. This work is currently in
progress with this bike.
 

EZL

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2016
305
592
93
Chenoa, Illinois, USA
Recently I have been looking at building a motorized bike, and stumbled across a frame I really like, the only thing is it is a 18 inch frame, but it looks like it would fit a 2 stroke engine.

Here is the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0176FSSPU/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

Does anyone have experiences in smaller frames like this? Does it appear like it would fit?

Thank you for any help, this will be my first build, along with my first post here.
There are several different sixthreezero models and I got a 7-speed which I didn't order in place of a single speed.
Here are the links to the bikes and they are getting pricey now:
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Sixthreeze...091470&hash=item3b05bb1fff:g:YzkAAOSw6MxarWKk
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Sixthreezero-Mens-In-The-Barrel-26-Inch-1-Speed-Beach-Cruiser-Bicycle-New/253499219967?epid=1800091470&hash=item3b05bb1fff:g:YzkAAOSw6MxarWKk

https://www.amazon.com/sixthreezero...=gateway&sprefix=Sixthree,aps,240&sr=8-4&th=1

What to look for on the location of the seat post, notice it is mounted behind the pedal sprocket housing a few inches.
The image shows the difference.
 

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EZL

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May 13, 2016
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EZL,
If those bikes are in your price range, go industrial quality.
Scroll down and read the specs.
https://www.worksmancycles.com/flyer-cruiser.html
Tom from Rubicon
Hi Tom, I am thinking that the 212cc is too much for a bicycle because of the torque/hp. The rear axle plus bearings
need to be a lot heavier. The frame is ok until you get to the rear fork assembly it's too light but seems comparable
in quality and strength like the Micargi. I suspect I will baby it through the Summer and pull the engine to replace it
with a 79cc. I'll wait till I find a motorcycle frame for the 212cc. I am running a 34 tooth sprocket on the bike now and
I was hoping that it would soak up some of the torque and that was not true. I can go to a 30 tooth and from what
I have seen from this thing 50 mph is nothing it just wants to climb. I removed the governor and the carb is rejetted
using GoPower Sports jets and I've been careful not to go full throttle on this thing! The stretched wheelbase is the
way to go on the beach cruiser bikes and there is no comparison in the difference in ride compared to the shorter
wheelbase like my Micargi. The price range on the single-speed stretch Sixthreezero with coaster brake runs about
$300 and the one a fella wants to stay away from to motorize bikes are the multi-speed ones. I was looking to find
the Micargi Fatal-Love 29" single-speed with coaster brake but never did find one it seems like people are buying
the heck out of them? The Micargi is real pricey but the frames are good for motorizing them.
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
You are right EZL to designate 212cc to motorcycle level.
A guy I work with stuffed a 212cc Predi into a Cranbrook frame and he went very fast until the rear hub locked up.
He lived to limp and tell about it. Bruises and abrasions.
My Flyer is rated to 5hp with a Honda 160cc engine,
I am running a 79cc Predi. It is rated at 3hp stock.
Pat Dolan builds an entirely different frame of .125" DOM
and .187" rear drop outs. With that set up, he has AFG build a 212cc engine to 25hp. And that is why he has a
Bonneville record.
 
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EZL

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May 13, 2016
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
You are right EZL to designate 212cc to motorcycle level.
A guy I work with stuffed a 212cc Predi into a Cranbrook frame and he went very fast until the rear hub locked up.
He lived to limp and tell about it. Bruises and abrasions.
My Flyer is rated to 5hp with a Honda 160cc engine,
I am running a 79cc Predi. It is rated at 3hp stock.
Pat Dolan builds an entirely different frame of .125" DOM
and .125" rear drop outs. With that set up, he has AFG build a 212cc engine to 25hp. And that is why he has a
Bonneville record.
The CVT on this thing makes it scary. I am thinking on going to the 30 tooth sprocket to see if it will make it more
docile. ;) The stock carburetor is too ragged as far as controlling the carb butterfly. I think the Mikuni might be the
way to go and to try. Even with the 34 tooth the bike climbs to 35 mph with just slight throttle control and I would
not even want to try a full throttle from a roll. I am certain that the spoked rim could not take the torque. The ride
with the extended wheelbase is far better than the standard beach cruiser. There's one gripe I have with the
CVT, it's noisy. I might add, this CVT must have been custom made for the kit since the back 5/8" shaft extends
out longer for the 10 tooth sprocket on the back of the transmission housing. There is no telling what else has
been changed on the transmission. Trying to maintain 20+ with the transmission and engine is not easy since
the ideal speed where it settles down is above 30+. The higher gearing from the sprocket is most likely interfering
with the where the engine is comfortable pulling and the transmission. The 40 tooth would probably take care of
that. I had the 34 tooth sprocket on the 49cc and it did top out over 40 mph but as far as acceleration, it made
the engine pull hard and slowed it down. This sprocket has no influence like that because of the CVT and the
engine torque. I think the 79cc might be a better choice to keep from getting carried away on these things. The
212cc "Death Row" is probably a proper name for the kit and HP/Pound is WICKED on a it! You'll sw this OM
babying a 212cc missile on the road. :p
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
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EZL, Curt is right about going to a larger rear wheel sprocket kind of conservatively. I am no expert but if you want to borrow a 56 tooth sprocket I have one. I don' know where you live but if is hilly that
set-up hills will be climbed and wide open throttle on the flats should keep you from breaking the speed limit. As I recall, my buddy was doing 45mph with a 44. Also if as I read you are using the Death Row kit the cast aluminum mounting plate had casting flaws that caused it to crack.
That defective part may have been replaced. I don't know.
Tom
 
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EZL

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May 13, 2016
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
I think you might be mislead on what I am doing. I have more than enough torque and RPM with this engine. The 34
sprocket is for highway speed. The 34 on a 49cc is too high a gearing for it but on the 212cc it is ok since the engine
can pull it and hills with no problem. The CVT gives good takeoff, way more than enough top end speed and gets
there fast enough. Running a lower gear ratio would bring the RPM up which is not really needed on the highway.
Most of the fellas are running 40-44 tooth sprockets on the kits since they are what came with them. The lower
gearing is ok for 2-stroke engines since they lack the torque at low RPM. A analogy, would a person run a 4.11
gear verses a 3.23 gear on a long distance highway run?

One of the fellas on YouTube put the 212cc kit on his bike with the 40 sprocket and topped the bike out using GPS
at 70 mph. He had to disable the governor on the engine to do that and was lucky the governor didn't disintegrate
in the engine, flywheel explosion or mechanical problems with the bike which could have put him in a hurt.

I am keeping an eye on the mounting plate on this CVT and I suspect that some of the fellas that have had problems
might have been rodding them. The 79cc mounting plate can be adapted to the current CVT. I suspect the problems
might have been what you said on the quality of the mounting plates. Check this vendor out:
https://www.hotrodminibike.com/product-category/jackshaft-systems/
There's another vendor that sells the quality aluminum drive systems for the 79cc engines but I'll have to look it up
later on. I ordered the kit with a 40 and gave it a try knowing before hand that it was too low. I wasn't going to pull
stumps with the bike. :D
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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The CVT is somewhat of a rule changer when gearing a 4 stroke for bikes. with direct drive and small hp four stroke motors gear reduction was and is necessary. 54 tooth was a good place to start on small 4 strokes & simple setups. CVT changes that to a large degree even on tiny motors but the 212 cc with a CVT can run a pretty small rear sprocket and still have a lot of low end grunt. Like EZL said crazy speed as well. The large displacement (torque) makes more difference than hp at the bottom end. 32 tooth should be more than adequate and stress on the frame, mounts etc. will be reduced during launches.

Rick C.
 
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EZL

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2016
305
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
Recently I have been looking at building a motorized bike, and stumbled across a frame I really like, the only thing is it is a 18 inch frame, but it looks like it would fit a 2 stroke engine.

Here is the Amazon link:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B0176FSSPU/ref=ox_sc_act_image_1?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

Does anyone have experiences in smaller frames like this? Does it appear like it would fit?

Thank you for any help, this will be my first build, along with my first post here.
I ordered a single-speed with coaster brake Sixthreezero on Ebay for $300 and instead got a 7-speed
which was expensive. Someone made a mistake on the order or just ran out of the model I ordered
and liquidated the 7-speed. The bike has a 212cc engine on it now and has plenty of room for this
engine. You might want to consider the more expensive one since it has V-brakes front and rear.
The hub size is 1" so you should go with a hub-adapter for the sprocket. I have a link on what this
bike looks like and it is pricey but would be a good one for the 79cc engine kit.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/sixthreeze...985032&hash=item261e112170:g:xLwAAOSwHola7K8z
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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I like the steel frame and stretched dimensions of this bikes design. I've a couple of questions that could be more easily answered if you would post a couple of photos of your bike with motor mounted.

Over the years I've put heavier and more powerful motors than the Predator 212 on just bicycle frames and with some restraint on my part they held together really well. Act the fool and they will hurt you and mature gentlemen don't heal well.

Of my more recent "motorcycle" builds one was a complete one off frame and the other utilizes major frame strengthening of an already great purpose built, for motorized use frame. Both include an operational pedal bracket and I still run bicycle hubs, wheels and tires. I like the look of all these things on vintage style builds, and they are a constant reminder not to ride 70 plus mph...just because I can doesn't mean I should!

It's obvious in reading your posts that you've thought through what your building and I look forward to seeing the progress photos.

Welcome to the forum, there are many of us older fellows involved in moto-bicycling.....

Rick C.