Roadmaster Project

Discussion in 'DIY Home Built Motorized Bicycle (non kit)' started by Gbrebes, Nov 21, 2010.

  1. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    Hello,

    I have been reading/studying about motorized bicycles for five months now, and I am finally ready to post some pictures of the project.

    I started with a set of worksman wheels. The chrome on the rims was in o.k. shape, but it was peeling in places, so I decided to take the rims apart and paint them. I have been inspired by a picture of a 1912 Triumph that I saw on this site, so I have decided on a black paint scheme. At the same time I added a drum brake hub to the front rim.

    I then found a Roadmaster Cleveland Welding frame on ebay. I was told that it was a 1940's, but I have no idea.

    After the frame, I found a truss rod fork that was supposed to be from a Schwinn. The fork had no trusses and the headtube was only 1" as opposed to the larger Roadmaster headset, but it seems very strong. I shimmed the head tube with copper pipe and I then made trusses (thanks bairdco for the how-to). I also made the truss rod headset, which is pretty rough.
     

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  2. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    I then started making a leaf spring fork suspension for the bike. A big thanks to Louie McCann for the how-to. Also thanks to a guy named Hooch over at rat rod bikes for the information.

    I used a leaf spring from a golf cart just like Louie. I cut it in half and then fabricated a rod to hold the leaf spring and attach to the wheel. I used parts from a Murray leaf spring fork (the rockers), and for now, I just tapped a pre-existing hole in the bottom of the fork for a 5/16th" grade 8 bolt that holds the leaf spring to the fork.

    I have fuzzy pictures of my well hammered ends, and my heating process using mapp gas.
     

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  3. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    I also added a headlight that I found at the Long Beach swap meet. So far, i run it off of a lantern battery, but it works!

    I bought the seat on ebay and re-upholstered/refurbished it. I also picked up a sprocket, crank set, and old chain at the Long Beach swap meet.

    So now I have a running bike and it really makes me happy. Its kind of weird, its just a bike, but it really means something to me.

    I also recently picked up the engine for the bike. This was the hardest part to figure out. I was first going to go with the EZ-Matic, but then I really got into the Lifan vertical four strokes. Couldn't find any of those so started measuring for the horizontal Honda clones.

    Then I came across a post by Msrfan, and I figured a Briggs and Stratton would be great if I could figure it out. Well, I got the engine, now I have to figure it out.
     

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  4. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    Here's some pictures of the full size drawing of how I plan to modify the frame. I am going for about a 56" wheel base. I plan on cutting the frame and using new tubing that will fit over the existing 1" pipe. All of the new joints will be lugged. I am also planning on making an in the frame tank.

    I included pictures of the now-dirty drawings that I did of different old motorcycles to help me get dimensions. I used a 1912 Triumph, 1913 Pope, an Excelsior and a picture of a motorized bike from this forum.

    I still do not know exactly how I will be transferring power from the engine to the back wheel, but right now, I am just enjoying riding it as a bike and working on all the little parts like fenders and stuff.

    I guess my next move is to start building a jig for the frame stretch. I want it to be fairly cheap, because I only plan on doing this once. I have seen the plans on ebay for the make it yourself metal one, but $150 for parts is still a little too expensive for me.
     

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  5. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    A few more pictures.
     

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  6. homebuiltbikes

    homebuiltbikes New Member

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    Love that seat. where can I get me one?
     
  7. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Grebes,
    I like your attitude of 'just do it' and working it out as you go. The leaf spring is different and your own. I like it. I like builds such as yours which have much to do with adapting, fabricating with what you have or can find, and keeping things within a budget. Deep pockets can simplify and make a build look great. Deep thinking and resourcefulness, time and patience can make it even better in my estimation... maybe less "perfect", but more real, authentic and your own. Very nice.
    SB
     
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  8. jose Pinto

    jose Pinto Member

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    Hello friend good night. I adore their projects, members like you that make this a great forum for sharing admire your plans. I am also thinking of doing a jig, who knows if we will still share ideas. One more thing, sorry oas measures being in Polgar, in millimeters was great. I'm kidding.
    laf flaff
     
  9. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    The seat is an old messinger bike seat off of a ladie's bike. I found it on eBay. The seat cover was some fabric/fake leather that was in need of replacement. So I took the seat apart, repainted the pieces and then put it back together using leather from an upholstery shop.

    The seat pan had a top and bottom plate, so it was easy to glue the leather down to the top and then stetch it and tuck it under the bottom pan, which holds the seat cover in place.

    Thanks for the comments guys.

    Gilbert
     
    #9 Gbrebes, Nov 22, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2010
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  10. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    Hey, hello to Portugal! My Dad's family is from the Azores islands, so I like the connection.

    About the jig, I was thinking of using a flat board and attaching 6 pipe fitting bases onto the board, then attaching metal pipe to the base fittings and that would be my vertical supports for the front fork, the back wheel part of the frame, and the crank set part of the frame. I do not really know the technical names. I saw a post in the Boardtrack Racer/Vintage section of this forum (my favorite section) by someone named boardtrackracer or something like that. He used these pipe fitting bases with vertical pipe for the frame stands and it seemed to work well.

    About the millimiters, I know you were kidding, but if you wanted to use the dimensions from my drawings, there is a metric to inches conversion function on the internet. If you just type in "metric conversion", you can convert the inches and fractions to millimeters. It probably won't come out to exactly even millimeters, but it might work out.


    Gilbert
     
    #10 Gbrebes, Nov 23, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2010
  11. jose Pinto

    jose Pinto Member

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    Hello Friend, thanks for your nice response, we are very pleased to be talking with a downward Luso. The truth, and that many people living in the Azores island couple immigrated to the U.S. especially the Azores. The Portuguese people spread around the world. Friend I do not dominate english well, any mistake I apologize. on the feedback I'm thinking of two anchors in bracket (in the USA this is the term) longitudinal, very tough, I work in a power distribution company, and I think take two irons in the support of transporting high-voltage lines which are very strong to withstand the forces of welding. I think to continue our conversation would be better to use email or face book, you think you agree?
     
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  12. silverbear

    silverbear The Boy Who Never Grew Up

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    Jose,
    I just wanted to say that I think your English is good and it is pretty easy to understand you. I also wanted to welcome you to the forum. Do you ride a bicycle with a motor on it there? Are other people where you live interested in bicycles with motors?
    SB
     
  13. jose Pinto

    jose Pinto Member

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    very good but my English is only possible with the help of google, would not be possible without it, yet we know around here say the thing diferente.fico so happy to know you understand. regarding the question you raise, I'm passionate about bikes and I no commercial interest. Until the present date has turned some bikes with engines electrico.actualmente'm turning a gasoline engine with 66cc full suspension. there is little time ago I bought a petrol engine (made in china) cruise beach. as soon as possible send photo to your friend.
     
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  14. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    glad to see people getting some use out of my truss rod idea. i've done it to 5 or 6 bikes now, and it even fools the experts. i had one guy trying to figure out when they started making them out of aluminum.;)

    i like the lines of your bike, gilbert. with a B&S motor it'll really have that old-timey look to it.
     
  15. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    Thanks for the response bairdco, I really admire the work you have done on the many projects that I have read about on this site. I am especially impressed with how you produce refined and creative fabricating with a minimal amount of tools and "shop space". Your shop is an outside deck, right? And I remember reading about the spaces in between the boards and how nuts and bolts sometimes fall into these cracks.

    Anyway, you have helped think that I CAN do it myself, and I thank you for that.

    Gilbert
     
  16. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    Here is a link to the thread where I saw the Triumph motorcycle that really inspired the look I would like to achieve http://motorbicycling.com/f38/finally-done-21088.html. The Triumph is on page #2. After looking at it again, I see that it was a 1914 Triumph, not a 1912.

    Also here is the picture of the jig set up that I was considering copying. It looks cheap and do-able. Thanks to Board Track Racer for the pictures.

    Jose Pinto, if you look at the pictures, this is what I was talking about. The vertical supports are plumbing pipe that has been cut at the top to accept the axle hardware of the bike. The vertical supports screw into the flanges that are bolted to the table.

    I believe that your idea of using all metal for the jig would be stronger, but for me it seems that it will be a little too expensive for a one-time project.

    Gilbert
     

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  17. bairdco

    bairdco a guy who makes cool bikes

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    yup, by the time i move there's gonna be a gold mine of nuts and bolts under that deck.:)

    thanks for the kind words. i do what i can with what i have and it seems to work out pretty well for me. and if i can share that with other people, all the better.

    imagine what i could build with a fully equipped shop! except i would probably still be smashing stuff with a hammer and ignoring all the fancy tools..
     
  18. jose Pinto

    jose Pinto Member

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    Hello friend, how are you.'ve Seen your feedback, and I think for some setups, you can fend along attached a photo of the feedback that I have planned to build.
    jose pinto





    URL=http://img812.imageshack.us/i/gabaritojig1.jpg/][​IMG][/URL]
     
  19. curtisfox

    curtisfox Well-Known Member

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    Onther awesome build. Keep the pictures comeing. I love the old briggs biulds can't waite to see how you do it
     
  20. Gbrebes

    Gbrebes Active Member

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    #20 Gbrebes, Nov 24, 2010
    Last edited: Nov 24, 2010

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