road bike mashup

Discussion in 'Motorized Mountain Bikes and Road Bikes' started by totalnewb, Jun 26, 2016.

  1. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]

    Here is what I have so far. I broke the head off the tightening screw on the clutch lever. One of the crank arms is too close to the exhaust and engine. I tried to bend the crank and broke it and I tried to bend the exhaust but I had no luck. When I resolve these issues this will be a kicken bike, at least to me.
     
  2. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    [​IMG][/URL][/IMG]

    A few questions:

    The wires to the ignition seem rather exposed to the heat of the engine is there a better way to mount these? I'm worried about melting on a long ride.

    Any tips on bending cast aluminum crank arms? I think they are cast aluminum.

    I live in a hilly area are there any tips for breakin? Should I start it and just let it run?

    Clutch usage question, always pedal to start moving or if running rev and release to start with clutch?
     
  3. Powertool

    Powertool Member

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    Always pedal to start moving -- this ensures a long clutch life...
     
  4. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    Thanks that is what I thought, I drive a manual transmission car so it is tempting to start with the clutch.
     
  5. 2door

    2door Moderator
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    Keep in mind, it's a motorized bicycle, not a motorcycle. You need to pedal up to speed, about 10 mph before releasing the clutch.

    As for break in procedures there is a lot of information here on that subject. Use the 'Search' and type in, 'Break In' and you'll have lots to read. Whatever you do, do not start the engine and let it run without riding the bike. The engine has no way to cool itself except the air moving over it. Long extended running/idling sitting still can damage the engine due to overheating.

    Tom
     
  6. Kioshk

    Kioshk Active Member

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    I've owned a few air-cooled VWs, and when a battery died, this was a great way to start them.
     
  7. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    I've owned a few aircooled vw as well. Loved them. I'm glad to hear that about not sitting and idling the motor cause I was thinking of doing that.
     
  8. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    It looks like I'm going to need a bigger sprocket. This one is way to fast when I open the throttle up a bit. I thought 44 tooth would be good and some would probably love it but man o man. I'll hook up the bike computer and check my top speed. I can tell already tho this is a hobby I will not shed easily. Unless the local authorities start giving me trouble. Its a small town so it could go either way.
     
  9. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    Ok new problem, at first I thought this might be due to the break in procedure, 16:1 ratio, but I thought it would be worth asking. when I pop the clutch to start the engine it is jerky and rough, only when I get some pretty good speed does it start to smooth out. Normal, too rich, break-in symptom, what do you think?
     
  10. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    Ok so "runs rough at low speed" is normal and the solution is to pedal faster. I'm thinking my solution will be to by a larger sprocket.
     
  11. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    Does anyone have experience with the 54 tooth sprocket on a road bike? I'm thinking that because the tire is large diameter a larger sprocket is needed anyhow. I don't need to go as fast as this bike is going now anyhow.
     
  12. Rudz

    Rudz New Member

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    54 will do wheelies and climb mountains. Would try a 48 first. It might not seem like much but only a few teeth make a huge difference.

    16-1 break in is too much oil. 24-2 for the first two tanks then 32-1 after that. Personally I use 91 octane and Opti 2 at 70-1 but that's me.

    The engine runs better after its been broken in, usually at least 100 miles. After that you ca start playing with the carb and jets ect.
     
  13. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    This thing is running great now during break-in I'm excited to see how a better oil to gas ratio will improve performance. I'm easily impressed but anyhow. The current sprocket is way to fast to get into the powerband takes me outside of my maneuverability zone. This would mean cruzing on the straight and flat are all I can do under power. I wouldn't mind having different sprockets I might buy them both. Thanks for the input.
     
  14. vatoed

    vatoed New Member

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    I'm fairly new to this as well but I have had a couple months and a few builds. That jerking will probably go away as the engine starts breaking in. I also noticed you'll get a fuller low end speed once it's broken in as well. Things are tight and she does not like going slow at first but once she loosens up its a whole new engine.
    The stock 44 tooth sprocket has been a very good choice on the few bikes we've built. I think you should wait to get your engine broken in before changing it. You will also get used to the speed as time passes. Run a couple, three gallons through it.
    Get yourself a good helmet and gloves. Be safe.
    Cheers!!
     
  15. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    Nice response, you have really addressed my concerns directly. I've been putting some miles on my rig and starting to notice exactly what you are saying. I'm starting to see a bit more smooth operation and a touch more power in the lower range. The trick is that I live in a hilly area and I have another bike that I really want to put the 54 tooth on. When I have all that I need I'm going to move the kit. My parents have a small property and I'd like to take it off road a bit. Not through the mud or anything but perhaps through the gravel and on hard packed dirt. I kind of wonder if I put a rack on the back and pegs on the rear wheel, if I might be able to pull a passenger. I'm dreaming I know but I do that from time to time.
     
  16. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    I hope I don't sound too sarcastic. I really do appreciate a good response. I've never posted so much on a forum before, but this is really fun. The bike is doing great, but I still feel like a larger sprocket is in my future.
     
  17. QuietRiot522

    QuietRiot522 Member

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    Im curious, have you considered a centrifugal clutch? I like mine alot and I wonder now how I got along without it haha. I like it cause I just have to kick off from a stop with my feet and pedal a little while laying on the gas, off ye go!

    I have a 48t sprocket with the 29er tires and I can climb a 30% grade hill that's about 1.5 miles long I think? Its pretty knarly for a little 66cc with 180lbs + the bike itself. I maintain 25mph up the hill and with the 48t I get up to just over 30mph according to my crappy speedometer. I didn't check what size wheels you have on your bike but if they are smaller than 29s then I believe you will have even more torque applied to the ground. The ratio with a smaller wheel changes. What Im trying to get at is if you go with a 50+ tooth sprocket you'll climb Everest but I believe youll loose alot of speed. Just my .02 the 48t seems to be a pretty good sweet spot for torque/acceleration, decent top speed.
     
  18. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    I like the centrifugal clutch but I also love the manual clutch. I have bad memories of pulling forever to start a weedeater. I agree that the 48 tooth would be the ideal sprocket for speed and power. Sometimes I want to go slower than I think most people will want to go. I plan on having a set of sprockets including more than what I need. I really do appreciate the input.
     
  19. QuietRiot522

    QuietRiot522 Member

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    Yeah, Ive heard that the pull starts for these kits are garbage too. However most of the centrifugal clutches for these kits come with a one way bearing so you can bump start. I don't like massive speed either, not on a bicycle anyway haha.
     
  20. totalnewb

    totalnewb New Member

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    That is awesome, bump start for centrifugal clutch.
     

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