rear sprockey alignment

squire

New Member
Nov 22, 2008
43
0
0
tampa
im trying to align the rear sprocket and i keep coming into problems! no matter what i do it seems to not be centerd... any tips or info on the best way to solve a centering problem?
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
Is it wobbly side to side, or "out of round"?

I have used a hammer to make them straight once tightened down...it was the only way for one I built. I just whacked it "smartly" a few times to true it up, as it was the sprocket warping, not tan alignment problem.

If you are having trouble centering it on the hub, slowly tighten your bolts in a cross pattern like you would do the head bolts, or the lug nuts on a car.

Some of the sprockets are drilled off center (good luck if that's the case).

If it is out side to side, just slightly, I would let it go. If it's running off center, you have to do something or the chain is continuously tightening and loosening and that causes all kinds of problems.
 

squire

New Member
Nov 22, 2008
43
0
0
tampa
yeah its out of round, so the chain tightening and loosening all the time, i using a sproket from kings. so im sure, well hope the hole is round..lol but just trying to find out the best way to keep it round while im tighitng it
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
I use a table with a slot cut in it, the wheel sitting in the slot with a piece of wood screwed to it (table) that I can swing over near the sprocket. I can then tell how much the sprocket is out while tightening it.

I use a rubber mallet, after getting it firm, but not tight, and "adjust it" as needed. just smack it on the teeth, and if your hole is drilled on center (measure it if you have any doubts) you will eventually get it on straight.
 

MB-Monkey

New Member
Nov 19, 2008
462
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47
Manchester TN USA
i started with all of the bolts out inserted the cut half put on the second half and placed the sprocket over them. placed the half moons on then started the nuts by hand. Then i broke out the cordless drill with a nut driver and a box wrench. if you set the drill to the lightest amount of torque and tighten all the bolts to that you will have a snug fit and the same tension on all the bolts. then use a socket set with a mark on the socket and count the same number of turns or each bolt in a star pattern. keeping the sprocket centered on the hole is the tedious thing i spent about an hour lining mine up and getting it right. i have a high or low spot not enough to have a problem.

you got a little more than my 2 cents
 
Jul 22, 2008
656
0
16
Northglenn,Colorado
I must have a bit of an OCD problem like that MONK guy on TV cause when I finagle a sprocket I could have watched two movies in my living room. I guess I could bang it straight but I find that simply spinning the wheel with my hands holding the axle and tight loose the bolts with an electric drill that has forward and reverse and you can control the speed rather inexpensive you find everywhere and with a 3/8 drive drill adapter and a combo wrench on the other side eventually will get it straight. I concentrate more on the movie I'm watching rather than my wheel that's important to keep your sanity and before you know it BAM! It's a done deal.
 
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squire

New Member
Nov 22, 2008
43
0
0
tampa
awesome thanks for the many helps!!! lol i have one quick one, i got a new chain from tractor supply
#41 but the new chain seems a tad bit wider then the stock on , is this normal? or should be the same size to the tee.....?

thanks once again
 

Andyinchville1

Manufacturer/Dealer
Dec 26, 2007
502
1
18
Scottsville, VA
HI,

I have used the "wedge" method with pretty good success to help reduce the up and down "wobble" on a sprocket....

Basically, look to see how much space you have between the sprocket center hole and wheel hub when the sprocket is perfectly centered...

Now find something small enough to use that will fit that gap (I have used cut paper clips with great success and the good thing is they come in different sizes).

Cut several pieces and Wedge the cut pieces in between the sprocket opening and the hub of the wheel (minimum of 4 places, 5 or 6 would be better).

Now tighten the bolts in criss cross fashion tightening the bolts a little at a time....The wedges will help keep the sprocket centered.

I was going to remove my wedges but they were in so tight I couldn't pull them out with my needle nose pliers so they are still in to this date! (I did use end nippers to cut them more or less flush with the sprocket just for looks).

With the rubber factory mounting system it is nearly impossible (we OK impossible? ) to achieve a perfect wobble free mount....YOu can get fairly close tho with time and patience

The only way to achieve a wobble free sprocket mount is to directly mount the sprocket to a disc brake hub or by uising the Top Hat Sprocket Adapter.

Hope this helps you.

Andrew
 

2door

Moderator
Staff member
Sep 15, 2008
16,326
124
63
Littleton, Colorado
This is how I do it but it's only for people with access to a lathe or mill.
First I confirmed that the hole was exactly centered in the sprocket. It was right on so I took a measurement of the inside diameter of the hole and the outside diameter of my hub. There was a little over an 1/8th of an inch, (.149 to be exact). Using the lathe I made a spacer that slipped over the hub and inside the sprocket. It was then just a simple matter of cross tightening the nine bolts and when they were tight the sprocket is perfectly centered on the hub and no wobble. This will only work if your hub is small enough or you machine the sprocket hole out enough to have room for a spacer. Any machine shop could do this for you but machine shops aren't cheap.
It might be overkill but there is no way the sprocket can shift even if the bolts loosen a little over time. Just my three cents worth.
Tom