Ready to go faster, advice?

Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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Currently I have a ported short rod with a dellorto sha, thrust ex, Jake head. I've been looking at relatively cheap power upgrades so I can have a monster come spring. I've had bad luck with Reed's in the past (Dio) but I've been considering the g2, mostly because I have also been considering zedas 'pre-ported' 48mm cylinder which comes with a windowed piston, I know it's 1mm but the idea of a bored out motor without changing the crank is attractive. I'd probably stick with the sha maybe a mikuni vm18 clone later on. If anyone has any info or experience(jetting)
15760298281541097284892.jpg
on the type of setup I'm looking at I'd really like to hear any feedback.
 
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Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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Just want to add I am familiar with porting though only vaguely when it comes to raising, and especially for Reed valves, the third transfer. I'd love to get into this I understand how it works but I'd love to hear experiences.
 

Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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And yes I'd love to have a k x 85 or cr, mz65 nice pipe but this was 35 dollars and it rips for a bolt on, I plan on mating it with the cdh USA larger nanner pipe later on
 
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Taffy13

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Sep 23, 2019
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Honestly gearing will get you more top speed then any engine mod you can do cheaply. It's just all about the tradeoffs. Do you want to not peddle off from a dead start? Then go with a larger rear sprocket. You want overall speed? You need a smaller rear sprocket. You want the ability to have dynamic gearing and not have to compromise then maybe a jackshaft.
 

Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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I looked into those forks they seem to be all high end mtb forks I'm really into triple tree at the moment so far these forks have actually surprised me with their adjustability, they're cdh I'm very happy with them, performance and all.
 

Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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Honestly gearing will get you more top speed then any engine mod you can do cheaply. It's just all about the tradeoffs. Do you want to not peddle off from a dead start? Then go with a larger rear sprocket. You want overall speed? You need a smaller rear sprocket. You want the ability to have dynamic gearing and not have to compromise then maybe a jackshaft.
This is an interesting view on things, it doesn't need to be 1000 horsepower just change the sprocket! Lol I'm definitely a torque guy. soon I will be getting bbr 10 spoke mags I will be looking into sprocket options for sure now
 

Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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I looked into those forks they seem to be all high end mtb forks I'm really into triple tree at the moment so far these forks have actually surprised me with their adjustability, they're cdh I'm very happy with them, performance and all.
Now im used to non suspension cruiser forks but for my area (lancaster, pa) these do the job on the shoulder( and yes i kill the engine so I don't scare the horse and buggy)
 

Tony01

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Nov 28, 2012
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I looked into those forks they seem to be all high end mtb forks I'm really into triple tree at the moment so far these forks have actually surprised me with their adjustability, they're cdh I'm very happy with them, performance and all.
Those things suck, they have no damping, they break, I personally have witnessed two sets get messed up in the lowers on a bike slower than yours. Dunno what adjustability you are talking about, they are just a pogo stick. Wouldn’t trust them on a pedal bike. If you spend more time looking at the bike with a beer in hand, than riding it, then leave them on. But if you really want to go faster and safely a quality single crown with turn it into a new bike without breaking the bank.
 
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indian22

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The first question I'm asked about any of my motos is "How fast will it go? The second question How old is it & is it a real Indian or a Harley? The public is clueless and I'd hope forum members will be a bit more insightful. I do like power that's both dependable and safe and if you read the old threads you'll learn all about all three.. Speed feels great till it hurts.

My answer to the first question is: "How do you think it would feel to be thrown out of a truck going 30 mph?" The second answer: How wealthy do you think I am?"

Have fun I have & I am!

Rick C.
 
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Noah T

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Oct 11, 2019
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The first question I'm asked about any of my motos is "How fast will it go? The second question How old is it & is it a real Indian or a Harley? The public is clueless and I'd hope forum members will be a bit more insightful. I do like power that's both dependable and safe and if you read the old threads you'll learn all about all three.. Speed feels great till it hurts.

My answer to the first question is: "How do you think it would feel to be thrown out of a truck going 30 mph?" The second answer: How wealthy do you think I am?"

Have fun I have & I am!

Rick C.
Safety is really important, the first time you throw a chain or blow a tire and fishtail at thirty, you realize that. Your boardtracks are amazing, slightly more custom than the approach I've taken, I'd love to buy a welder, a 30s washing machine motor and really make something awesome . Unfortunately I just moved to a second floor apartment and space is... limited. I have mag wheels on the way that I'm going to put hydraulic front and rear shimano disk brakes on. With speed comes responsibility I guess.
 
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Noah T

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Safety is really important, the first time you throw a chain or blow a tire and fishtail at thirty, you realize that. Your boardtracks are amazing, slightly more custom than the approach I've taken, I'd love to buy a welder, a 30s washing machine motor and really make something awesome . Unfortunately I just moved to a second floor apartment and space is... limited. I have mag wheels on the way that I'm going to put hydraulic front and rear shimano disk brakes on. With speed comes responsibility I guess.
Who cares about the coaster brakes though right, the forks are what's gonna end my life lol
 
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indian22

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These bikes are a sum of their parts multiplied by their intended use. I'm an old guy and now a quite conservative rider but one who rides daily year round...with great caution, but I was once young with W.O.T. and long hair afire, but not enough of that left to comb let alone burn. Aggressive riders really need good stuff on their moto-bikes: brakes, forks tires etc. spending money first on the basics and building frame out. That way you have a stable platform on which to mount a motor capable of higher speed. The bike shown in my avatar is capable of eighty mph, but I chose to use bicycle wheels, tires and brakes for a more authentic board track look...so I ride it seldom and keep speeds way down. One day I'll probably upgrade these components, but in the meantime great caution will be exercised on infrequent rides.

I didn't pay much attention to safety in my youth and 68 years of riding starting at 5 years of age & 60 years of motorized riding have left their scars. Have fun & ride safe...these aren't necessarily contradictory concepts.

Rick C.
 

waynesdata

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Jul 10, 2017
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A good Zeda will do 55. What kind on breaks do you have in mind? The CDH fork is known to be unstable at that level of power. Anything over 30 You should start looking at down hill rated fork breaks and a wheel set with good wheel bearings. A wheel locking up at any real speed would suck. I look for sealed bearings.
 
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indian22

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Yep quality on forks, hubs/wheel & tires. Brakes 200 mm front and rear. Check Ghetto bikes out for quality sealed bearing hubs front and rear or complete billet wheels sets with 12 or 10 ga. spokes. 110mm or 135mm spacing. Rear hub is set up for disk on right side and motor drive sprocket on the opposite. Setup this way lessens brake contamination from two stroke oil, for bikes with left side exhaust. I run the his rear hub/brake on my 2 stroke hybrid e-bike & would run his front hub were it not for the e-motor up there. I run 180mm up front and back as well, but bigger rotors are better...if you've room for them. I'll be going up on rotor size soon.

My hybrid is a Grubee with 5" extension plates gives 53" wheelbase and makes the bike much more stable at higher speeds as would adding a frame to fork stabilizer, which I've run on other bikes that displayed bad manners at high speed, the so called "death wobble", but the Grubee with longer wheelbase doesn't require one. Whatever fork you run no matter the price or quality make sure it has positive trail measurements. My Grubee shows 1.5" positive. My fork is an antique style single spring toggle type certainly not comparable with a good downhill fork and still it tracks well at speed on roadways and not at all an off road setup!.

Rick C.

DROP MOUNT 10.jpg
 

Taffy13

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Sep 23, 2019
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What makes the cdh fork bad? I've heard things that are bad such as they have poor rebound and that the top crown:confused: Buckles but have never really seen anything to substantiate the claims.
 
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waynesdata

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What makes the cdh fork bad? I've heard things that are bad such as they have poor rebound and that the top crown:confused: Buckles but have never really seen anything to substantiate the claims.
I read a post about the fork "bucking". That sounds like a issue with the way the head set fits together.
 

indian22

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Forks are a matter of degree and what you're used to. No reason to expect a $150. fork to preform like a $1,000. downhill setup. If your used to no suspension a sprung fork of any type feels pretty good. I build vintage style bikes with1900 era forks girder, dual spring, single spring, leaf etc. with no rebound control so I don't expect much in the way of suspension & and there isn't, compared to a decent MB fork with hydraulic or air rebound control and a world of difference from the really good stuff with 5" of travel or more.

It's hard to prove something in a court of law let alone in print so enjoy what you've got and upgrade if you want proof, but it really costs to do so. I like round steak and love ribeye and because I've tried both I have proof of which I prefer, but I still eat and enjoy round steak more often because it's quite affordable and tastes good, just not as good.

A bucking fork by definition, is one that doesn't have adequate rebound control or no rebound control. The spring compresses to absorb the initial shock, but slams back to it's stationary position too quickly without adequate resistance from some type of shock absorber most frequently hydraulic or air types on better forks. Thus a fork alternately compresses and slams resulting in that "bucking" feel. I know this feel well because all my classic fork equipped bikes demonstrate some degree of this characteristic and that's what I use on all my bikes builds, but on my mountain e-bike I have really good full suspension forks and shocks that ride like a dream compared to any of my classic forks on hardtail frames.

Rick C.
 
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