Painting the engine

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle Welding, Fabrication and Paintin' started by CMA_Decky, Dec 6, 2008.

  1. CMA_Decky

    CMA_Decky New Member

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    Well I finally got my chinese two stroke mounted on my frame. Luckily in all my college wisdom I chose the cheap shoddy looking old mountain bike frame. Anyways, I'm repainting the frame satin black this weekend and was thinking about painting the crankcase red. I have the red ceramic engine paint which is good up to 500 degrees (or so it claims).

    Does anyone have any tips on painting the crank case? Will the paint even adhere or is it just going to chip off. Maybe I should stick to just the drive sprocket and clutch covers?
     
  2. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    No need for special paint.

    Clean the parts to be painted with MEK, acetone, or laquer thinner thoroughly.

    After it's dry, use an etching primer for added security, and then paint away with whatever you have.

    I have use Rustoleum (o.k.) and Krylon (very good- even on the exhaust...after the first 4") and walmart spray paint (O.K.)
     
  3. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    I've been having good luck with BBQ paint...
     
  4. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Sometimes painting just the removable engine covers looks great. You might try that first and see if it gives you the look that you want. LOL
     
  5. CMA_Decky

    CMA_Decky New Member

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    I was thinking about painting the crankcase and covers with the red-orange engine paint. I'd like to see if I could get a rediculous rat rod look (the bikes painted matte black).
     
  6. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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  7. wheelbender6

    wheelbender6 Active Member

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    Orange was once the color of Chevy high performance engine blocks, as late as 1978. That's a definite ratrod color!
     
  8. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    how do you like that 4 stroke kit on your Black Suede bike?
     
  9. eDJ

    eDJ New Member

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    If anyone here goes to clean parts with those solvents Bikeguy Joe mentions and doesn't have much experience with them....do try to do it outdoors in a well ventelated area. I've worked with the MEK (Methal Ethyl Keytone) which is an inorganic solvent and "wicked" on one's lungs. The others are bad enough. The vapors are dense and linger on the ground and can build up on the floor of a closed garage in the winter.

    Once my Dad and I were working in the garage and we were up on this pontoon boat deck we were building. Grandma's ol wiener dog was on the floor curled up by the gas heating stove as we started cleaning metal work with the acetone. We heard funny noises and it was the wiener dog with her nose in the crack at the bottom of the door huffing for fresh air. We simply forgot about her being there and the vapors. Dad and I were up higher and it didn't notice but it only took a few minutes to pickle the pooch.

    Just a heads up.

    I've learned that when working with aluminum and you want paint to stick to it.......using a mixture of "Lye" mixed in a strong solution with water and appied to the metal, it will create micro pits on the surface that the paint will hold to. It will be nearly impossible to ever get it off once painted on.

    Another process for coloring aluminum is to anodize it. This is a process of dying aluminum. I think it could lend itself to the covers of the motor as well.
    I have a book around here titled, "Formulas Methods, Tips, and Data that gives instructions on anodizing aluminum. The internet abounds with information on doing it too.

    Basically:

    Be careful with Nitric acid coming in contact with copper !

    Read more about it here:

    How To Anodize All Your Aluminum Parts - ThirdGen.org
     
    #9 eDJ, Dec 7, 2008
    Last edited: Dec 7, 2008
  10. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    That bike was built for a customer... It ran great, but I personally prefer the 2-strokes.
     
  11. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    Why's that? Is it because they are easier to deal with? 2 strokes are definitely cheaper.
     
  12. Venice Motor Bikes

    Venice Motor Bikes Custom Builder / Dealer/Los Angeles

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    There are many reasons I prefer the 2-strokes... they ARE cheaper, they have more torque, they have fewer parts to break, I like that they have a real clutch (not a centrifugal), they look like real motorcycle engines, they have engine braking, the gear boxes in the 4-strokes suck!, you never have to check your oil, the list goes on!!
    Probably the main thing with me is that they look soooo much cooler than all the other engines out there! (looking cool is very important!) :D .boogy1a .fly
     
  13. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    No doubt. But I was looking at a 4-stroke kit, and other than the red cover, they don't look to bad. Those can probably be removed or painted, pinstriped or whatever. The two strokes do look better and I am used to a clutch too. I had a chance to cruise on a 4 stoke and dug it pretty well. My current proj has changed quite a bit due to donations. I got a chicks mt bike, and three weedwacker motors, so I got some figuring out to do. Been reading Deacon's posts for clues and pointers and what not. I think I'm gonna mount it low and use a chain, keep the clutch til it blows up.
     
  14. jasonh

    jasonh New Member

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    Only problem is engine braking really isn't the greatest for a 2-stroke, especially at high speeds. When that throttle snaps closed, you're not getting as much oil as you need for the higher rpms that the motor will still be turning.

    But yeah, the 2 strokes are great. Never have ridden a 4 stroke though.
     
  15. Bikeguy Joe

    Bikeguy Joe Godfather of Motorized Bicycles

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    Good point about oil starvation.

    I HAVE "ridden" a four stroke- outboard....my Briggs and Stratton 4 T outboard is THE BIGGEST P.O.S. there is.
     
  16. Long&Black

    Long&Black New Member

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    rotfl

    Went from best way to paint to 2 vs. 4 stroke.
     
  17. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    Well to get back on topic, here's what I would do:

    Take the engine out of the bike (if it's in there).

    Take the covers off (clutch, crank, and generator) and remove the gaskets. Also take off your exhaust and gasket.

    Spray the covers with Auto strip or Aircraft remover. Then spray the engine with the same stuff. This will remove the gray paint or whatever is on the chengines. Let the stuff get dry and flakey. Have a beer, or chill out for a while.

    When it's dry and flakey, hit every part with a drill and wire wheel to knock off the flakes. Anything else sand off or respray. After this is done, take a damp cloth and wipe everything you sprayed thoughoughly.

    Go to an auto parts store or wallyworld and buy engine paint with ceramic. This is fuel and heat resistant. You don't necessarily have to primer the stuff but it may help. There's no need for clear coat unless you want it.

    When you spray the parts, hold the rattle can about 4-6" away from the part and do several light even coats. Let each coat dry, have a beer or chill out or whatever, and do all over again and again until it is all covered.

    Put everthing back together.

    If you want to do some custom stuff. Then after the parts are stripped, take a sharpie and draw your design on your covers or whatever, then use masking tape to tape off the section you don't want, let's say black. Then spray the whole part black, the same way I stated above.

    When that's good and dry, remove the tape and then tape over the sections you painted black. Spray the new section with red or blue or whatever. Repeat the same process as above. When that's dry remove the tape and lightly sand the borders to help erase the lines, then you could get some adhesive pin striping to cover the border, or paint the pin striping on. If you use the adhesive type, then spray everything with a couple coats of clear.

    Everything can be done with rattle can. If you want to use conventional spray paint, be sure to primer and cover with automotive clear, because grease, gas, and heat could and will damage your paint job.
     
  18. jasonh

    jasonh New Member

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    in regards to the custom stuff, it'd probably be easier to just spray the lighter color, then tape off whatever design you want to stay that color, and spray with your darker color.

    Less taping, easier to get it nice.
     
  19. Saddletramp1200

    Saddletramp1200 Custom MB Buiilder

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    Good Man eDJ! DON'T mess with MEK it very bad stuff. !!!
     
  20. sojudave

    sojudave New Member

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    my only thing would be that the paint would feel uneven you know? The darker color would be raised up. Do you have an idea on how to get around this?
     

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