Old Guys Simplex moto-peddle bike

fasteddy

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Feb 13, 2009
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British Columbia Canada
We are blessed/cursed with blackberry bushes here on the West coast. They were brought here from the Himalaya's to control land erosion. The birds have spread them everywhere to the point if there is land that they aren't cleared from they take over. I watched a early 1970's Mustang when it was pulled over a freshly trimmed patch, disappear under them in three years to the point where you couldn't see the car.

They are huge and when they ripen in a couple of week I hope to be able to get out and fill a 5 gallon bucket. Usually takes less than half an hour. Black berry pie with a side of ice cream is worth fighting for and fight you will. The thorns point inward and while your hand goes in easily, retrieving it is very painful.
If a blood sacrifice is required I'm willing.

We are a fortunate generation to have lived when we did. Perhaps the virus will cause people to pause and reflect on their lives and future generations will have the chances to grow up in much the way we did. They will not how ever have the Lone Ranger and Tonto, Roy Rodger and Dale Evens and Gene Autry, Cisco and Poncho to guide them on the path to true happiness.

In so many ways I feel sorry for them.

Steve.
 

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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I eat those wild mulberry with worms today but save the sassafras berries for the deer.
Back East where I lived before a Huge Mulberry Tree (unfortunately not white) we picked berries and were often tracked in on the white carpet to the displeasure of my Mom. There was a small bush of white Mulberries if I remember correctly too. We hung a hammock from a fence to the tree trunk. It was the rugged canvas type. Lots of time in the back yard picking also Peaches, cut out the worm type. Sour cherries that were real juicy and good flavor for eating an pies too.

Today I noticed my Orange tree still getting back to normal after hiatus from more temperate Bay Area or near Pacific Coast. The time spent inland at 3000ft and snow and 20F temps had it indoors for Wintering. Now 3 year since last fruiting, I had 7 oranges, but 3 fell off while pea size. a group of 5 so close to one another with wind had those 3 make enough room, no more hopefully will fall off. One is Gumball size and 1 is pea size and 2 are marble size.

Cascade Hops bines 4ea have had 2 reach 12foot lines I set up. 1 is a foot shot and the other 2 foot short of the top. Three of the bines have burs all forming up near top. A hand full have had the burs form cones. There are still a couple months left for them to get a small amount harvested. Beer hops aroma is about all the small harvest could be used for. I am limited with all my plants and trees in containers. Brewing should begin soon with dual thermostat ice pack and heater wrap on glass carboy in insulated bag. I also have used a chest freezer converted with thermostat to hold at brew temp from 60F +- a few degrees, but the insulated bag leaves my freezer for storage. Freezer Shock Packs are supposed to be equated to about needing 1/3 less weight than ice (frozen water). Commercial Czech Saaz Hops pellets for a Pilsner Brew I also want to try a hand at. The other being Light Lager with the Commercial Cascade Hops pellets and my whole cones from my plants as finishing hops for aroma essence.

Blueberries have had most all been picked clean. About 3 an 1/2 quarts harvested. Deer fenced area with half of it with bird netting for my berries and a lounge chair when not too hot or overhead Sun, so I can enjoy time in the garden.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Oklahoma
Mention of a hop crop always makes me smile MT. The brew master's art is so very interesting & practical in this age of tasteless sugared drinks of a thousand varieties I'm glad I'm restricted to water, unsweetened tea & coffee, but it doesn't mean I don't appreciate the great taste of a quality beer, just can't have it or most any other beverage. Since the foods I can tolerate are also quite limited gaining weight is almost impossible.

A large number of our land run neighbors were first generation German immigrants fresh from the old world. Good God fearing folk and great farmers. I used to haul and stack baled hay to their barns. The work was hot and tiring but the farmer's wife would often bring us good home brewed beer to refresh us. The was very dark and just cellar cooled & served from large pitchers into huge glasses. That only occurred when Papa sent word to Mom that the work was done and that the boys were thirsty. How the old farmer's would beam with pride when we praised their skill as a brewer & I often heard them modestly credit the quality of the "Hops crop" as the reason the beverage was so outstanding. It was also danged potent!

Rick C.
 

PeteMcP

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Jun 27, 2017
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Speaking of beer.... just watched yesterday's episode of the BBC's 'Countryfile' and they covered the Covid related brewing crisis crippling the artisan craft beer industry, which, under normal circumstances, had become a real growth area. Shame to see aerial shots of one idyllic looking hop farm with acres of matured hop fields going to waste while the lady farmer explained how she couldn't bring herself to insist her craft brewer customers honour the contracts they had with her if they were not brewing any ales. Another interview with a lady brewer who's usually thriving business had hit rock bottom, showed her warehouse stacked with empty barrels - and worse - her unsold fresh brewed beer being poured down the drain by the barrel-full. Had something in my eye watching that....

Pubs (and eateries, who, let's not forget, rely to a large extent on profits from beverages) here in the UK have only just recently been allowed to reopen after months of Covid lockdown - but the catch is none of them will come close to being able to operate profitably due to restricted numbers being allowed entry thanks to social distancing rules being rigidly observed. Every customer now has to leave their contact details for the 'Track and Trace' database. I've yet to figure out how drinking alcohol and social distancing can hope to work well when a night out gets underway...

In an era of supermarket-bought spirits and beer for home consumption, the traditional English pub was having a tough time even before Covid. Pub closures are at a record high and have been steadily increasing year on year. This pandemic could be the final nail in the coffin for many more. And it won't stop with pubs. Our High Streets will never look the same again.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Hi Pete, glorious day ahead here in the Territory and I feel a casual ride through the town and country side is in order. Our weather has been quite Fall like and it's really been quite evident over the last week and I'm saddened to say I've only enjoyed it in part due to the conflicting necessities of life.

As the every day landscape of life continually changes and at an accelerated rate due in large part to the pandemic; one can't quite grasp the long term generational significance this ongoing heath threat holds for our lives. Your High Street and rural America's Main Street multiplied by tens of thousands locations and hundreds of million lives all altered dramatically in every conceivable aspect for, I suspect, generations. Lives and businesses lost are only the short term metrics of misery to come. For those who believe in social evolution, as a theory or a fact, are going to see what implementing it looks like once again. Each generation or two seem to want to test it despite the horrors surrounding it that's already revealed through past history.

Core moral values that have benefitted society for thousands of years always win out through the centuries. These are not dependent on ones religious beliefs or disdain, though I hold to them personally. Moral values work to build good individual lives as well as societies and the macro is important in realities of life.

I'd very much dislike a world in which ale served in a social setting isn't...though not personally permitted to enjoy any longer. A local tavern "May's" added this slogan to their signage, "Where friend's meet" and Pete I also can't see how social distancing is going to work in these settings of relaxed community.

Lift one or two for me!

Rick C.
 

MEASURE TWICE

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Jul 13, 2010
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Pouring beer down the drain? I guess selling whole barrels, there is not as much market for as bottles. As manufacturers retooled for masks, I say retool for bottles?

While picking up at the "parking lot out doors" of a home brew supply business, I saw used empty pint bottles with a free sign. I passed on it and got 3 cases of 12 oz empty new bottles of medium weight. My crown capper can even recap a bottle half drank and still have some fizz later. Bit of a light weight myself. At most a pint I could generally say. Tap beer is something special, but the more increased cost of equipment I'll stick with this for now.

The business had a Tent setup. There were orders ready for people to pickup with there names on the boxes outdoors under the tent on tables.

Hops can be frozen I thought and kept for some time. I suspect though storage and energy could make it a losing game. I found some programs at colleges on growing hops for craft beer at online websites for South Eastern Seaboard States. I found out a bit late as it dwindled like 5 - 10 years ago. The pictures were nice to look at.

In the news it has been reported about sailing and motor yachting from US into Canada with the intent to head to Alaska. Just there are enough cases that it is tourists faking it. What is more some have noticed the turning off anti collision navigation equipment that could be used to track the vessels.

I'd travel just a few miles to the Pacific and used beach and river access, but the tourist have even week days now making me think social distancing is not really going to work. 2 months ago was possible. I am thinking a electric motorized wagon I could use to transport my skin diving equipment and electric underwater scooter. Alternate access is just to far to carry gear if I cannot park closer. When it gets colder I think things may slow, that crowds are not the case.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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The electric hand carts are so cool and useful as well. We have a great number or manmade lakes in Oklahoma so boating and watersports are quite popular MT but lugging gear from parking to the marinas is a nuisance for owners larger cruisers that remain in the water during season. I've a friend with a day sailor of just under 30ft. who switched not only marinas but lakes this Spring and got a quarter of a mile closer. As it is he can unload his gear, supplies and crew about fifty yards from truck to boat and he still thinks the electric hand truck is something he needs (another old guy). I miss being on the open water of the Gulf and Caribe especially, but this is what I decided to do, no regrets.

Good Mexican food, barbeque and beer is our idea of fine dining in the Territory and just South in the Baja Oklahoma, (Texas district) this may be bad for the waistline but great for the soul!

Rick C.
 

Tom from Rubicon

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Apr 4, 2016
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Rubicon, Wisconsin
Rick, Sorry you can no longer partake of the other "Mothers Milk" .

Pete, fear not the old Ale House Pubs may suffer for some time, but social gathering places so deeply entrenched in English society of the Middle and Working Class. Seems to me irreplaceable unless the Colonial emigrant shift of cultural norms has a strong influence. My Moroccan friend does not think me evil for my love of beer.

MT, so far here in SE Wisconsin we are getting beer from both Coasts, IPA's are dominate.
It was thirty plus years ago when an acquaintance began brewing at home and mastered it science. He made both top and bottom fermented allowing for their temperature preference, and Lagers. His brews spoiled me ever on.
Tom
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Here's a link I had saved for electric motor parts to power carts or wagons.

Steve.

I've dealt with them in the past for specialty parts that are hard to find. Good stuff. Covid has slowed their shipping however, but they are open!

Also if you click on their gear ratio calculator they have a very useful one especially for electrics.

Rick C.
 

indian22

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Dec 31, 2014
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Conversations of brewing and tandem motorized barstool tool boxes cum grill/smokers brings to memory food and the social events center on the food and beverage. Most, I'd think, of us enjoy food and beverage centered gatherings. I lived in Tejas for almost twenty years & Texans love the barbeque cookoffs and especially chili cookoffs the apex being held at Terlingua, Tx. and typically held first weekend of November and it's a monumental team event and outdoor party weekend. Enormous sums of money are spent on some of these cookoff rigs. Some are built on full size semi frames and powered by Peterbilt road tractors at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars, all new equipment and big team financial support. Air conditioned, custom pull out slides, stainless steel kitchens, except for the cast iron cookware. Now that to me is ultimate land powered cooking rig. A side note: The big $$ teams seldom win, but it's really all about the social atmosphere that's fun combined with a food & beverage event.

Our little five man chili cookoff team won the state of California event decades ago, but never the big one at Terlingua, though I'd boast ours was better!

Bike events partly based on food, would be fun.

Thoughts to share? I'm off on a ride!

Rick C.
 

EZL

Well-Known Member
May 13, 2016
305
592
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Chenoa, Illinois, USA
Conversations of brewing and tandem motorized barstool tool boxes cum grill/smokers brings to memory food and the social events center on the food and beverage. Most, I'd think, of us enjoy food and beverage centered gatherings. I lived in Tejas for almost twenty years & Texans love the barbeque cookoffs and especially chili cookoffs the apex being held at Terlingua, Tx. and typically held first weekend of November and it's a monumental team event and outdoor party weekend. Enormous sums of money are spent on some of these cookoff rigs. Some are built on full size semi frames and powered by Peterbilt road tractors at a cost of hundreds of thousands of dollars, all new equipment and big team financial support. Air conditioned, custom pull out slides, stainless steel kitchens, except for the cast iron cookware. Now that to me is ultimate land powered cooking rig. A side note: The big $$ teams seldom win, but it's really all about the social atmosphere that's fun combined with a food & beverage event.

Our little five man chili cookoff team won the state of California event decades ago, but never the big one at Terlingua, though I'd boast ours was better!

Bike events partly based on food, would be fun.

Thoughts to share? I'm off on a ride!

Rick C.
Nothing tastes better than food and drinks outside! (^)

Dennis
 

fasteddy

Well-Known Member
Feb 13, 2009
6,513
2,241
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British Columbia Canada
I worked for an auctioneer who had lived in Huston Texas for 20 years. He had a bar and he hired a chap with a smoker on Friday and Saturday night to add to the draw for the bar. Jack said he was really good and well known. After a few weeks Jack would go out to where the smoker was and the fella would show him tips and trick that he's learned over the years.

A couple of years later he wanted to retire and he offered Jack the smoker and he said he'd stay around for a while to make sure there was a smooth change of owners. Jack bought it and as he said what do you do when you own a smoker, you go to competitions to see how good you are.

He won a lot of them and the original owner of the smoker heard he was doing well and called him up and said Jack was ready for the next step and to stop over at his house. Jack got there and they went out to a barn, pulled tarps off a house trailer frame and there was a BBQ Smoker deluxe.

It had three propane tanks converted to smokers on it. The type of propane tanks that you would see behind peoples houses. A huge wood rack on the front and a 250 or 300 gallon propane cut in half that served for cooking beans and chili. The original owner had used it for years at all the top cook offs in Texas and gave it to Jack.

I only saw the photos but it was impressive. Jack had a wall covered in trophy's. He was still BBQing when I moved away 13 years ago and he had a large following but only cooked for weddings and special events.

Jack said the best advise the old owner gave him was to make sure you deliver the samples you were taking to the judges to be tested were in pre warmed coolers. It seems by the time they have gone through dozens and dozens of samples that had cooled off they smiled on the people who were thoughtful enough to make sure the samples were hot.

Steve.
 

MEASURE TWICE

Well-Known Member
Jul 13, 2010
2,409
493
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CA
Here's a link I had saved for electric motor parts to power carts or wagons.

Steve.

I have two rear wheels on the wagon without a through axle connecting the two wheel. The axle 5/8" diameter stubs go through the bearings in the wheels and a washer and cotter pin keeps the wheels in place.

I thought of either modifying by cut and weld for a through axle. There still is fastening the sprocket to the wheel. There is no free wheel like on a bike, so the parts they include have threads to go nowhere on this.

Other is one or maybe two friction drive motors on each wheel. I don't know if the controllers have feedback knowing if a wheel is slipping. If it did and would intelligently control speed on both rear wheels that would be interesting.


That is the link to the Gorilla Cart that I have.

Now even more what I could dream of is a motor and drive train that could be submerged in salt water for short while. The electronic controller could be above water higher up on the wagon. I have a hand launch boat and have seen sold front wheel that is steerable, so it takes weight off the bow along with the removable transom wheels. If the wagon could be doing the same with powered wheels that I have seen for near 2 grand and up. I don't need a lot of power as I have minimum weight in the boat and load it up after it is in the water.The RIB has been in the past a great way to access dive sites.
 

Tom from Rubicon

Well-Known Member
Apr 4, 2016
1,135
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113
Rubicon, Wisconsin
I have two rear wheels on the wagon without a through axle connecting the two wheel. The axle 5/8" diameter stubs go through the bearings in the wheels and a washer and cotter pin keeps the wheels in place.

I thought of either modifying by cut and weld for a through axle. There still is fastening the sprocket to the wheel. There is no free wheel like on a bike, so the parts they include have threads to go nowhere on this.

Other is one or maybe two friction drive motors on each wheel. I don't know if the controllers have feedback knowing if a wheel is slipping. If it did and would intelligently control speed on both rear wheels that would be interesting.


That is the link to the Gorilla Cart that I have.

Now even more what I could dream of is a motor and drive train that could be submerged in salt water for short while. The electronic controller could be above water higher up on the wagon. I have a hand launch boat and have seen sold front wheel that is steerable, so it takes weight off the bow along with the removable transom wheels. If the wagon could be doing the same with powered wheels that I have seen for near 2 grand and up. I don't need a lot of power as I have minimum weight in the boat and load it up after it is in the water.The RIB has been in the past a great way to access dive sites.
 

indian22

Well-Known Member
Dec 31, 2014
3,823
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Oklahoma
Tom I love boats and have owned quite a few offshore power boats of various brands and types. The link you provided is so informative of today's tech and design, which is really amazing. I like the sail rigs as well but never owned any except for the little Sunfish type used for training and entertaining my kids and their friends. Perhaps my favorite offshore fishing rig was a 32 foot center console which was state of the art thirty some years ago for long range fishing offshore. 100 fathom water is the realm of the bill fish and to reach this was close to 100 miles out from the farewell buoys off the Galveston jetties (about 60 from Corpus Christi). Twin counter rotating prop Yamaha's with 300 hp each powered it. The electronics included Raytheon radar, SSB transceiver, Vhf and cell phone. Loran navigation system etc. Dual battery systems and chargers as well. It carried 220 gallons of fuel and needed most of it for one outing. I bought it right with less than fifty hours of run time from a lawyer who was afraid to get it out of the bays let alone lose sight of land. Not nearly the biggest craft I've owned but it remains my favorite because of the many adventures she took us on. I bought it for fun but used it for business. If you want to know the character of a man you're thinking of partnering with on a deal; take him for an eighteen hour bob in the Gulf with steady 6 to 8 foot seas. You learn things. Actually see what he's made of and often smell it too!

Rick C.