New to motorized bikes

Discussion in 'Motorized Bicycle General Discussion' started by bign, Oct 4, 2015.

  1. bign

    bign New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    Wanting to build a beach cruiser style bike. i weigh 250lbs i know im gonna need a bigger motor for my weight. What would be a good motor set up for me? Any additional info would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,310
    Likes Received:
    38
    Welcome to the forum. You'll find lots of help here to get you started on your first motorized bicycle project.

    You'll also find that there are plenty of big guys building and riding these things and many use the standard Chinese 2 stroke engines. You might also want to explore our 4 stroke section as an alternative.

    Whichever way you decide you're in for some fun. Take your time and do lots of reading here or just ask if/when you need help.
    Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.

    Tom
     
  3. bluegoatwoods

    bluegoatwoods Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2012
    Messages:
    1,581
    Likes Received:
    1
    We're glad you joined up.

    250 lbs is not really all that much. Just ride a bit gently. When motorized a run-of-the-mill bike is taking a strain that's getting near it's limit. So you don't want to beat on it. That's hard on your own body, too, for that matter.

    I don't think I ought to recommend an engine. That's an individual thing. Some of us like 2 cycles and some of us like 4s.

    Just spend some time reading around here. Click on any thread that looks interesting and you'll learn a lot.
     
  4. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,777
    Likes Received:
    89
    if there are a lot of hills in your area, you might consider a 48 tooth sprocket, but you could add that later
     
  5. Cylon

    Cylon Member

    Joined:
    Jun 26, 2015
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    8
    Im 230 and my 66cc two stroke is good for me I often wear a backpack too.
     
  6. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,708
    Likes Received:
    3
    I was going to say the same thing, at 215 lb myself, the 66cc engine on a 60lb bike has done just fine for me using the 44T rear sprocket... You should have no issues with a 66cc as long as you don't ride in a really hilly area, and if so, a 48T may do the trick... if the hills are really steep, you can get 56, 60, and even a 72T rear sprocket to cope with steep hills, but at a cost of top speed...
     
  7. bign

    bign New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    What speeds are you getting out of your 66cc motors
     
  8. bign

    bign New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I can't decide weather or not to do a stretched cruiser or a fat tire cruiser
     
  9. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,310
    Likes Received:
    38
    You'll probably get lots of answers on this. You'll see everything from mid 20s to high 40s. A lot depends on factors such as if the engine is stock or modified, how the carburetor is tuned, type of exhaust, sprocket size, tire type and size, and lots more.

    Generally speaking you can look for top speeds in the high 20s to mid 30s. Those would be considered about average.

    As for your choice of bike, cruiser, road, mountain, that will need to be your decision based on your preference of style, type of riding you plan to do, load carrying capabilities, terrain and other factors not to mention your budget. Take some time and look through our 'Pictures & Videos' section and see if you see anything that suits your fancy. There is also the 'Cruiser' section if you're leaning toward that style of bike.

    Good luck and keep us posted on your progress.

    Tom
     
  10. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,777
    Likes Received:
    89
    depending on where the stretch is put in you could get motor mount difficulties, depending how fat tires are, you could get chain run difficulties - I'd recommend a simple build for the first timer, then get used to all the things to be learned about riding it while starting the more complex build
     
  11. bign

    bign New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2015
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm noticing on some of the satire bikes they either run a shift kit or jack shaft set up to fix the chain alignment issues
     
  12. 2door

    2door Moderator
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2008
    Messages:
    16,310
    Likes Received:
    38
    These things are possible but the ease of installing them and having them work correctly is dependent on your skills. Another option is an off-set engine which requires custom fabricated mounts.

    I have to agree with crassius in that for a first bike project you might be better off to keep things simple, learn what works and what doesn't and save the more ambitious strategy for your next build. Not trying to stifle your dreams and we have no idea about your mechanical abilities so we're just offering opinions.

    Tom
     
  13. crassius

    crassius Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,777
    Likes Received:
    89
    arrrgh - so now 2door only agrees with me when he has to : )
     
  14. Davezilla

    Davezilla New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2014
    Messages:
    2,708
    Likes Received:
    3
    Definitely keep your first build simple as possible.... then as you learn these things you can better decide how to get more out of the bike. If you need more hill climb ability or if you want more speed, both these can be accomplished while keeping the bike a simple single speed bike either by changing sprockets to get more speed or better hill climb, or by keeping the stock rear sprocket and doing the necessary upgrades to get the speed you're looking for or the climbing power. My first build was topping out at around 28mph, then it got faster as the engine broke in. I did some port work, added a Fred head, then made up a pipe for it and the bike was topping out at 43mph with plenty enough down low to climb hills if needed.
    Adding a jack shaft so you can use the gears is also a good way to get better acceleration, climb, and speed while keeping the engine stock or close to stock, but doing the build first, then as you break in the engine and all you will have the time to read up in here and ask questions to get a better idea of how you want to set your bike up and which method is best for you and your budget. The more you learn about these things, the easier it will be to decide which way to go and get the results you want.
     

Share This Page