List of the best top quality long lasting rugged engines

jamey

New Member
Oct 12, 2008
4
0
0
massachusetts
Hi everyone.i am new to motorized bicycling and I would very much appreciate your advice....

I am currently working in a job i am not too happy with and in the spring of 2009 i'm going to be leaving.... taking a road trip around the country....and riding a motorized bike everywhere and anywhere. my plan is to mount it on the back of my jeep and take it wherever I go.... I want to be able to take it off and ride around small towns and cities and see the country. since i will be needing this engine to work every day and may find myself stuck in a place i don't want to be, i'm beginning my motor kit search on this forum by requesting a list of your top three motor kits which you believe will be my best chance at having something I can correctly and easily install with clear instructions.....will go at a decent speed but with excellent gas mileage, but most of all....I need it to be rugged and long lasting with minimal problems. Since this motor will mean a lot to me price is not my biggest problem. of course the cheaper the better, but having something I can rely on means more to me right now.

I need a very rugged engine with long life and a relatively minimal amount of maintenance and repairs needed.(one that is known to not have mantenance/repair issues) The good news is all i have right now is a 15 year old mongoose mountain bike and a little extra cash in the bank. So I am completely starting from scratch....I need a bike and a motor kit.... but it seems most motor kits are fairly universal with normal v frame bikes with smaller rounded bar frames....

please send me a short list of your choice for a most reliable and high quality bike motor kit...I really do appreciate the help.

Thank you!

James
 

lennyharp

New Member
Jul 19, 2008
429
1
0
Mesa Arizona
My most reliable build was a Staton-Inc motorized bicycles, bike kits & gear drive kits. inside drive kit using a Robin Subaru EHO35 1.6 hp 4 cycle. I think it is as reliable as any thing both the motor and the rest of the kit. I now have a Whizzer that is not a kit. It does look like a dependable bike, but weighs 100 lbs. I have done about 3 China bike motors from various dealers and would not call them really dependable but I am learning and may be able to make one more dependable than I have done so far. The cost is less than half the Staton or Gebe. I would like to try a DAX as they seem to get rave reviews from owners.
 

Easy Rider

Santa Cruz Scooter Works
Jan 15, 2008
2,144
4
38
Nor*Cal
If you're looking for a 2 cycle motor, my choice would have to be the Morini. It's more expensive but worth the money because of the power and reliablity.
 

stude13

New Member
May 28, 2008
404
0
0
north bend wa.
my idea would be a 4 stroke because of gas availability. and motors by honda or robin subaru. this is based on noise. there may be places on a trip when sounding like a weedeater might not fit in.
 

MikeBike

New Member
Oct 7, 2008
145
0
0
Palm Springs CA.
what ever you get: make shure you have a lot of spare parts, and know how to install them. its always good to think that reliablity is in the owners hands.
 

Jemma Hawtrey

New Member
Dec 29, 2007
288
2
0
Essex, UK
The short version is this.

Anything built by a recognised manufacturer - ie honda, tanaka, robin and so on will be reliable and more or less fit or forget - inasmuch as your engine is not likely to give you problems although the drive system might.

Industrial two strokes such as the Tanaka benefit from a tuned pipe and adjustable carburettor as do the CIF engines but the manufacturer engines are more likely to be reliable and long lasting than the CIF 2-strokes (Chinese In Frame). There is also the advantage that the manufacturer engines are low emissions and high performance.. for example my 32cc Tanaka with pipe will top out at 35mph on flat roads as compared with the CIF's 50/60/'80' for roughly the same performance but using more fuel and at a higher oil mixture.

To be honest I would go with a two stroke manufacturer engine on either a Golden Eagle or a Staton kit. Flexible, reliable and eminently tunable - 2 strokes are simply the right tool for the job. GE & Staton are the best of the mounts - belt and chain respectively, although the Dax Titan is also good but fairly noticable.

Jemma xx
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
Jemma- the one exception being if we ran these chinese bike engines like you do your Tanaka, they would only last a few hours!
 

Jemma Hawtrey

New Member
Dec 29, 2007
288
2
0
Essex, UK
Jemma- the one exception being if we ran these chinese bike engines like you do your Tanaka, they would only last a few hours!
If you mean the NM fuel - I havent used that for a while - seems the low end is better without it.

I might start using it again since its really hard to start in the cold at the moment and it seemed to improve starting..

In the UK the best way of staying safe is keep to the traffic speeds and take the lane. Most people will sit behind you at 30-35mph but they wont at lower speeds so you have to run around that speed or risk getting some idiot try and take you out. The UK doesnt have 20mph speed limits.

Its also better to be faster in the dark since the faster you are the shorter time you are available as a target to the drunks and corsa-chavs.. although this should not be done on unknown roads.

Jemma xx
 

jamey

New Member
Oct 12, 2008
4
0
0
massachusetts
First I want to say thank you to everyone replying....I really do appreciate the advice!! I will go with a 2 cycle name brand engine. I will also go with a name brand.

After I posted this I had a conversation with my father about the project and I have a few more questions now.

1. He mentioned that he didn't think that motorized bicycles had the ability to be basically placed in to neutral so that you could choose weather you wanted to use the engine or just pedal the bicycle like a standard bike with no engine... I did not realize that... I just assumed I'd be able to use the bike for exercise and then when i was tired or got stuck somewhere I could just kick the engine on and be on my way... is this not the case?

2. I see there seems to be two major types of motor styles. there are some which are mounted on the center frame and attach by gear to a rear wheel sprocket. Then there is another type which rolls on the tire and attaches above the rear tire.... what are the advantages/disadvantages of these types? with respect to my trip across the country and desire to be able to pedal and use the engine seperately....is there a better choice?

3, I am also going to be buying a new bike... I want something that is excellent on the road, but also can handle a few hard bumps and minor offroading... anny suggestions on which type of bike? my price range for the bike itself is under $700 and I will probably be looking on ebay for the bike... but i'm thinking if i can't pedal it..... then i might as well just get a cheap road bike from walmart and mount it..... i'm leaning towards a middle of the road ...road bike.... with straight handle bars and thin tires but with aggressive tread...anny ideas?

I think after these questions i'll pretty much know what i'm looking for and i'll keep you guys informed how the project goes if you're interested to hear about it.... have a great night!!

Jamey
 

lennyharp

New Member
Jul 19, 2008
429
1
0
Mesa Arizona
Staton-inc offers a freewheeling system that mounts over the rear wheel. It actually has a second freewheel on the left side of a special hub that comes with the kit. I used thi8s and could ride with others as a pedle bike when I wanted to. The China Bike center mount motors use a hand clutch but it is not as freewheeling asd a freewheel because the chain must still turn and there is still some motor pasrts turning. Most systems will allow some pedling but it is a little different for each as to how well it works.

The motor that drives by friction is not as efficient as other systems but the motor can be easily disengaged for regular riding, again Staton inc has one of the better kits. I like the gear / chain drive but the belt drive systems are pretty nice and have no oil on the chain problems.

A mountain bike is hands down the best one for function especially if you might ride off road some. The tire choice is what makes the ride on pavement work well just as a different tire works best offroad. I generally use a moderate knobby tire as it rides ok on both. There are some slicks with relief tread that are supposed to work even better as a dual purpose tire. I have used the Town and Country from Continental for a dual purpose tire and it was really good and durable. The diamond frame style is the strongest for it's weight usually and a suspension fork comes on bikes in the price range you mentioned. A good Cro Moly Steel frame is best in this price range.
 
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jamey

New Member
Oct 12, 2008
4
0
0
massachusetts
ok cool...thanks guys.....i recieved a nice private message from a guy/girl who also said pretty much the same you did but with the golden eagle belt drive.... what do you guys think of that one? he seemed very sure it is an excellent drive and I believe he may be right...I like the idea of this drive allowing for easy disengagement so i could pedal drive my bike whenever i wanted.......if the chain is connected to the motor....even if the motor is disengaged, there still would be friction from the chain and sprocket i'm assuming so even more so pushes me to a belt drive...

I was also told a 4 cycle would be my best bet? and a small engine such as 35cc.....i agree with the smaller engine idea...i'm not looking to ride the bicycle on the highway lol but i don't really understand the difference between two and four cycle and i have been told both "2 cycle is by far the best bet" from about 3 people and that "i would go with a 4 cycle if i was you" from 1 person....

another private message told me "the spindle (friction) drive are horrible on wet surfaces. Also if something (like a thron or glass) is on the surface of the tire, the roller will pinch the object into the tire. That's another thing to consider. Friction drives are very prone to flats. Hope my advice helps.
Good luck"

I don't think i'll ride under very wet conditions, however the road might be wet some days even if it's not raining. I'm not too worried about the flat tires though...i would guess the pressure from riding over glass would be worse for a tire than what a belt could do? and i will stay away from glass..........also with many local bike stores all over the country... a ten dollar fix for a tire wouldn't be a big deal, but yeah it would suck if it did cause a flat and i was in the middle of nowhere lol...

also i was suggested to buy a cheaper bike... no need for an expensive bike... i agree but i think that's more just taste... i mean if you want a super nice bike you pay for it... but i think i'll go in the 3-400 dollar range new off ebay...

ok...well you guys have helped me a lot so this will probably be my last big message with tons of questions...i know there are many other people here you need to be helping!! :O) thank you again, I hope to be on this site for a long time and look forward to talking to you all when i break down in bodock south dakota lol maybe even someday be helping someone too someday... have a great day guys,

Jamey
 

lennyharp

New Member
Jul 19, 2008
429
1
0
Mesa Arizona
If you need to get places on any schedule you may want to rethink quality. Flats are a problem. Broken bike parts are a problem. Broken motor parts are a problem. As I commute around town I appreciate any quality I bought that helps me be more reliable so I can get 15 miles across town when I expect to and not be broken down somewhere along the way. I let others buy cheap but I want to buy dependable quality. And then I still carry tools and flat fixens.
 

Jemma Hawtrey

New Member
Dec 29, 2007
288
2
0
Essex, UK
I have done over 1000 miles on a golden eagle machine, and probably 700 on the one I had before that before it was stolen.

The trick with those is to make sure you set them up properly - as with everything really.

Most bikes will be ok - but be very very sure they have decent brakes (and if necessary, spend money on decent brake pads - such as the clarks WRC I use).

You will need to check the spacing on the back wheel for the sheave for the Golden Eagle (GEBE) but otherwise its fairly straightforward.

I have to say that I would not ride anything other than a two stroke machine - mainly because it suits the conditions out here.. and I dont go on (at the moment) journeys where I would need to pull in and fill up. The longest I do is 20-25 miles with the majority being between 5-8 miles.

hope that helped..

Jemma xx
 

Cr9ck

New Member
Sep 7, 2008
57
0
0
First off I want to say I am not an expert and my advice should be taken with a grain or heavy portion of salt.

AVOID FLATS!!! THEY WILL DRIVE YOU CRAZY!!! (at least they drive me insane)

Spend some good money on tires. I don't know if armadillo makes mountain bike tires but they are suppose to be tough. I have these thick pyramid brand tubes that are very thick and nice although there is probably a better brand. I got them from a guy I bought my bike from and he slimes them up for me. You will really hate having to change a wheel with 2 chains on a bike that weighs 40+ pounds.

List:
1. Nice Thick tires (perhaps armadillo road/offroad hybrid slicks)
2. Nice Thick Tubes
3. Slime
4. (optional) liner

Bike Choice

I have seen a few used trek bicycles for about $200-$250 used on craigslist. They are supposedly decent bikes and are a brand name. Do some google research for a solid bike.

Bike repair kit

Get a chain cleaner and repair/maintanence kit. Maybe even pick up a portable stand or something for when you are working on it.

Go with a four stroke if you want to save a little hassle on gas mixture stuff. I don't know about power/reliability but the gas mixture nonsense might get to you over time.

If you do go with a clutch system you can get a freewheel setup.

bicycle Motorized BIKE GAS ENGINE - 40T freewheel Axle - eBay (item 190258533603 end time Oct-16-08 19:52:20 PDT)
 

Motormac

New Member
Sep 23, 2008
108
1
0
Ontario Canada
I would agree about getting a 4 stroke, for long distance running they are more reliable (Honda or Robin subaru)and you can pull into any gas station and fill up with straight gas.A Honda would be my first choice.
 
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Easy Rider

Santa Cruz Scooter Works
Jan 15, 2008
2,144
4
38
Nor*Cal
List:
1. Nice Thick tires (perhaps armadillo road/offroad hybrid slicks)
2. Nice Thick Tubes
3. Slime
4. (optional) liner
Good Choice! I have the same tires and I've never had one flat. These tires have a kevlar liner in them. I've pulled hundreds of thorns and pieces of glass out of them and I'm amazed they are still holding up. Here's a picture of a crappy tire that had me limping for weeks.


 
Jul 22, 2008
656
0
16
Northglenn,Colorado
You can fix that with JB weld lol!!!!

You know what I find rather amazing is that I have YET experienced a flat from the front tire. It seems the drive tire has more forces.

Currently saving up for a second Titan engine. The one I have now a bit over 3500 miles still purrs like a kitty still starts first pull and it's currently shared by my bike and my trike. Easy average of 20 miles a day just today I went 50 miles easy meeting up with a friend from my discussion forum that was in town.
I can only praise what I ride and own and I praise the Titan big time.
I love the China 2 strokes as well but that's a tinker engine all the way. But when it's purring it does so rather nicely.
 
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Cr9ck

New Member
Sep 7, 2008
57
0
0
OUCH!!! How did that blowout happen? I really hope my older tires hold up on me. I don't have a liner but I do have the nice thick tubes.