Help! My head is spinning from the plethora of available kits!

Ritchie

New Member
May 20, 2008
14
0
0
Manitoba, Canada
After reading everything on this excellent site, I thought it safe to whip out my Credit Card and buy a 2 stroke "80cc" Chinese Kit.

I've seen these advertised as 65cc, 67.Xcc, 70cc and 80cc. I've seen them advertised as square engines, round engines, black engines, new Roller bearing engines (no.9), new roller bearing engines (no.10), and larger cooling fin engines.

And now, just as I'm about to purchase a kit, I see a 66cc EPA approved motor!!! With "Russian Clutch Lever".

All these engines, (from the pictures at least) look totally identical to me.

I'd like to have the latest engine, but even more important, I'd like to purchase an engine that has the most common and interchangeable parts.

Can someone please comment on the interchangeability of spare parts for these engines?

Any help is greatly appreciated as I'd like to purchase the motor soon.

-Ritchie.
 

Pablo

Master Bike Builder & Forum Sponsor
Dec 28, 2007
3,664
5
38
Duvall, WA PNW
www.sickbikeparts.com
All the approx 70 cc, 2 stroke, China bomb engines are largely all the same.

No need for the stinking Russian clutch lever....and I doubt it's made in Russia anyway!

Roller bearing = important.

The rest is fluff. And probably lies anyway.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
If you are in the U.S. and you want a Chinese frame mount bicycle motor kit go to www.thasdax.com or ebay seller I.D. dacscommm. Or look on the left side of this page with the green bike...Good after the sale service. As good an engine as you are loikely to find from the Chinese mainland.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
or go on ebay and buy the cheapest one you can find if you need the extra bread. You don't sound as though you do, but one never knows. I don't think there is a lot of difference in the engines. If you need advice after the sale this is the place to go... If you need parts they are cheap enough. If you need the warm fuzzy feeling I hear dax is the after the sale service dealer to use.

If I hadn't screwed up because this site did not exist mine would have gone flawlessly. One of the members here before this site existed helped me get mine back on track. Whatever you do ask question don't guess. People here love to help.
 

Ritchie

New Member
May 20, 2008
14
0
0
Manitoba, Canada
Thanks guys, I've now purchased a needle roller "80cc" Chinese frame mount 2 stroke. I got it from ebay. I'll post my comments when it arrives :)

-Ritchie.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
Good luck and just remember to check here for the instructions since the ones with your kit will probably be crap. If you aren't sure about something ask. I am dead serious if you get your installation right the kit shouldn't be too much trouble to debug.

there are some very typical problems we have all heard about so let us help you if it doesn't fire right up.
 

blacktop_sailor

New Member
May 21, 2008
18
0
0
Round Rock, Texas
I'm kind of in the same boat as Ritchie.

I was originally looking at one of the Skyhawk II kits, since I'd prefer a 4-stroke, and I'd also prefer an in-frame install.
But none of the rear sprocket's look like they'll fit my bike with the drum brake on the rear.

There's just so much to sift through on Fleabay, and all the kits appear similar, but after reading the forums I see that there are subtle differences in the kits, and especially the quality of the service you get from the seller.

Anyone know if what I'm trying to do is even possible?
4-stroke, in-frame install, and compatible with a rear Drum Brake setup?
I'm not totally lost, but a point in the right direction would save me some headache and worry.
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
Blacktop sailor- I think you are a candidate for a Whizzer conversion! Frame mount, four stroke, belt drive wheich gets you around the drum brake problem.
 
Last edited:

Boilerman420

New Member
May 18, 2008
5
0
0
Tamaqua, PA
I'm kind of in the same boat as Ritchie.

I was originally looking at one of the Skyhawk II kits, since I'd prefer a 4-stroke, and I'd also prefer an in-frame install.
But none of the rear sprocket's look like they'll fit my bike with the drum brake on the rear.

.
I just had that problem with my PK-80 kit
I measured the brake hub with a cheap 4"
brass caliper, about $3-$5 at a hardware store
or on fleabay.
Anyway, it measured just under 1 7/8",
so I traced it out on the sprocket and trimmed
it out with a die grinder and a 1/4" rotary file.
I would suggest as a cheaper alternative (since most folks dont
have a $200 die grinder). Get a hole saw of proper size and the
necessary arbor. screw the sprocket onto a piece of wood, find the center
by using the bolt holes. start the pilot bit into the wood and be sure that you
get a straight bite when cutting into the metal.
It should go pretty quick, you can oil the hole saw blade and it will cut better
without burning the metal. If you decide to change sprockets, you already have the tooling to complete the job.

-J.R.-
 

Bikeguy Joe

Godfather of Motorized Bicycles
Jan 8, 2008
11,843
236
63
up north now
A little work with a grinder or really go at it with a dremel and you can make the sprocket center hole large enought to clear your drum...it may not end up being the prettiest, but it will work.
 

blacktop_sailor

New Member
May 21, 2008
18
0
0
Round Rock, Texas
So you think it would still attach to the spokes with the rag coupler, even with the larger hole being ground in it?

If so, then that would make an easy solution, even if it isn't the prettiest.
 

deacon

minor bike philosopher
Jan 15, 2008
8,117
3
0
north carolina
I enlarged my hole with a 3/8 drill and a metal rasp from the home depot. Like joe said it weren't dressed for the prom but it worked okay.